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The Revolutionary Paul Revere Paperback – April 6, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (April 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595550747
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595550743
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,722 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Joel J. Miller is the author of several books including The Revolutionary Paul Revere. His writing has been featured in The American Spectator, Reason, Real Clear Religion and elsewhere. He blogs on faith and spirituality at joeljmiller.com. He and his family live in Nashville, Tennessee.

More About the Author

Joel J. Miller is the author of Bad Trip, Size Matters, and The Revolutionary Paul Revere. His writing has been featured in The American Spectator, Reason, and elsewhere. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee, with his wife and two children.

Customer Reviews

The book itself reads like a story or novel.
S. DeWeese
Joel J. Miller's, "The Revolutionary Paul Revere" is a well written, thoroughly researched, most interesting look at a most interesting man.
Seaotter
If you like reading about the American Revolution and its heroes, then The Revolutionary Paul Revere by Joel J. Miller is the book for you.
Jay I. Cookingham

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Christina Lockstein on September 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
The Revolutionary Paul Revere by Joel J. Miller is an essential biography for any Founding Fathers collection. Paul Revere is best known for his midnight ride made famous by Longfellow's poem, but Revere played a vital role in America's quest for independence. He didn't have family ties going back to the Mayflower like John and Sam Adams nor was he wealthy like George Washington or Thomas Jefferson. Revere's story is that of the everyman who was angered by the unfair British taxes and practices and wanted to do something about it. Miller's writing has real flair that brings two hundred year old events to life. Readers will quickly come to understand the real Paul Revere and his role in the Revolutionary War. He was a brilliant entrepreneur who developed one of the first copper mills in the US and wasn't far more than just a silversmith. His cartoons and engravings inspired colonists because of their symbolism and the emotion he captured. I've read several other biographies of our Founding Fathers, but Revere is the first who seems like an average man, someone most Americans can relate to. Miller's writing makes it an enjoyable read and as well as an important one to understand how the son of a French Huguenot became one of the most famous men of the Revolutionary Era.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By HardyBoy64 VINE VOICE on May 29, 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I love history and was immediately drawn to this new book on Paul Revere. I quickly noticed that the language choices made by the author proved to be just bizarre in places and the overall tone of the book was quite disappointing. The way the author presents his research seems to undermine his very work. I almost felt like he was trying to tell a bunch of kids with ADD about Paul Revere so he resorted to an over-the-top bells and whistles approach to the story that ruined the book for me.

We have seen great historians present their version of history in compelling and novel-like language. David MCCullough in "1776" and "John Adams" moves the narrative along with literary language and the result is an engaging read. The same could be said about JAmes Swanson in "Manhunt" or Nathaniel Philbrick in "Mayflower". Joel Miller does not follow in their footsteps and his language proves to be the downfall of this book. Here are a few examples:

1) The overall tone when refering to the British army is disrespectful. They are refered to as "The Brits" throughout and the reader doesn't get the feeling of objectivity because of it. When refering to the death of the British General Edward Braddock at the Forks of the Ohio River, he oddly says that he "bought it at the Forks" (p. 30) Does he mean "bought the farm"? Bizarre word choice. There are many numerous examples of this type of language.

2) There are strange transitions throughout the book as he tries to move the narrative along. My personal (funny) favorite is " Politics was newly hot, hot, hot." (p. 176).

3) At some point, a historian has to imagine thoughts and motivations of a historical figure and Miller attempts at inhabiting Paul Revere but makes some hokey comments.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A. Mathews on March 25, 2010
Format: Paperback
Recently I was given the opportunity to review The Revolutionary Paul Revere by Joel L. Miller. To be quite honest, I was a little unsure about reviewing a biography; I have never been much of a biography reader. However, considering that I was running low on reading options I decided to give this book a try. I am so glad I have this book a fair chance. Unlike the biographies I had grown accustomed to, this one is full of intrigue, excitement, and witty writing. This book was by no means a dry biography on one of our country's influential men. From a busy Mom's perspective I particularly liked that each chapter was short and easy to read in short chunks of time. When I read I prefer to read a chapter or more at a time. Most biographies are presented in long and drawn out chapters that require large chunks of time to read. Fortunately, this one does not. Each chapter is manageable reading; 10-15 pages.

The writing style of this book brought the story of Paul Revere alive for me. I felt like I was living in the late 1700's with Revere and his family. I felt the pain of his financial struggles and the triumphant of his personal achievements. Miller does an exceptional job in this book of bringing not only the character and his life alive but also the impact of the society that Revere lived in. The 1700's were an every changing time and the events in Revere's life were a direct result of the economical and political world around him. If you or an older student (late middle school to high school age) enjoy reading about American history and the people who influenced our early years, this book is a must read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Boomershine on May 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
"Paul Revere is famous for his ride. He's essential for so much more." Joel Miller's book, The Revolutionary Paul Revere, amazed me and annoyed me.

First, this book was a great idea. It's as much about the American Revolution as it is Paul Revere, but it gives the story and sequence of the events of the American Revolution as seen from Revere's eyes, and I have never read a non-fiction work on this era like this. It is astounding to see how vast the breadth of Revere's touch was. Revere is mostly famous for his "Redcoats are coming" ride and perhaps for silversmithing, but every bit of his life was more interesting and hands-on than you could have known. Revere was a brazen and brave leader amongst the Patriots. He was ingenious and productive. He was deep and broad in his skill and passion. He was hands-on in building some of the amazing and lasting works of that era (including the USS Constitution, which would not have survived so long if not for Paul's quality work keeping it held together).

My grievances are small, but I was disconcerted that Mr. Miller repeatedly used a rather flippant, modern jargon to apply to the matters at hand. Word choices that pulled us out of the time period to our modern one. I noted it 17 times and may have given grace to others. Thankfully, they were top-heavy at the front of the book so I was less put-out as I went along. In telling of a general being killed in action, Miller said he "bought it." In describing how Revere and his first wife met, he employed the informal "became an item." When the stores were not allowed to sell, they were, "on ice." The technique doesn't make it unreadable, it just lops off some of the import that Revere and his important work conveyed.
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