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Revolver Original recording remastered

4.6 out of 5 stars 1,182 customer reviews

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Revolver
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Vinyl, Original recording remastered, November 13, 2012
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Editorial Reviews

The Beatles' acclaimed original studio album remasters, released on CD in 2009, make their long-awaited stereo vinyl debut

Manufactured on 180-gram, audiophile quality vinyl with replicated artwork, the 14 albums return to their original glory with details including the poster in The Beatles (The White Album), the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart Club Band's cut-outs, and special inner bags for some of the titles

The titles include The Beatles' 12 original UK albums, first released between 1963 and 1970, the US-originated Magical Mystery Tour, now part of the group's core catalogue, and Past Masters, Volumes One & Two, first released individually in 1988, featuring non-album A-sides and B-sides, EP tracks and rarities. With this release, The Beatles' first four albums make their North American stereo vinyl debuts

There has always been demand for The Beatles' albums on vinyl. Indeed, 2011's best-selling vinyl LP in the United States was Abbey Road. Following the success of The Beatles' acclaimed, GRAMMY Award-winning 2009 CD remasters, it was decided that the sound experts at EMI's Abbey Road Studios should create new versions of The Beatles' vinyl LPs. The project demanded the same meticulous approach taken for the CD releases, and the brief was a simple one: cut the digital remasters to vinyl with an absolute minimum of compromise to the sound. However, the process involved to do that was far from simple

The first stage in transferring the sound of a master recording to vinyl is the creation of a disc to be used during vinyl manufacture. There were two options to consider. A Direct Metal Master (DMM), developed in the late seventies, allows sound to be cut directly into a stainless steel disc coated with a hard copper alloy. The older, alternative method is to cut the sound into the soft lacquer coating on a nickel disc - the first of several steps leading to the production of a stamper to press the vinyl

A 'blind' listening test was arranged to choose between a 'lacquer' or 'copper' cut. Using both methods, A Hard Day's Night was pressed with ten seconds of silence at the beginning and end of each side. This allowed not only the reproduction of the music to be assessed, but also the noise made by the vinyl itself. After much discussion, two factors swung the decision towards using the lacquer process. First, it was judged to create a warmer sound than a DMM. Secondly, there was a practical advantage of having 'blank' discs of a consistent quality when cutting lacquers

The next step was to use the Neumann VMS80 cutting lathe at Abbey Road. Following thorough mechanical and electrical tests to ensure it was operating in peak condition, engineer Sean Magee cut the LPs in chronological release order. He used the original 24-bit remasters rather than the 16-bit versions that were required for CD production. It was also decided to use the remasters that had not undergone 'limiting' - a procedure to increase the sound level, which is deemed necessary for most current pop CDs

Having made initial test cuts, Magee pinpointed any sound problems that can occur during playback of vinyl records. To rectify them, changes were made to the remasters with a Digital Audio Workstation. For example, each vinyl album was listened to for any 'sibilant episodes' - vocal distortion that can occur on consonant sounds such as S and T. These were corrected by reducing the level in the very small portion of sound causing the undesired effect. Similarly, any likelihood of 'inner-groove distortion' was addressed. As the stylus approaches the centre of the record, it is liable to track the groove less accurately. This can affect the high-middle frequencies, producing a 'mushy' sound particularly noticeable on vocals. Using what Magee has described as 'surgical EQ,' problem frequencies were identified and reduced in level to compensate for this

The last phase of the vinyl mastering process began with the arrival of the first batches of test pressings made from master lacquers that had been sent to the two pressing plant factories. Stringent quality tests identified any noise or click appearing on more than one test pressing in the same place. If this happened, it was clear that the undesired sounds had been introduced either during the cutting or the pressing stage and so the test records were rejected. In the quest to achieve the highest quality possible, the Abbey Road team worked closely with the pressing factories and the manufacturers of the lacquer and cutting styli

An additional and unusual challenge was to ensure the proper playback of the sounds embedded in the 'lock-groove' at the end of side two of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Requiring a combination of good timing and luck, it had always been a lengthy and costly process to make it work properly. In fact, it was so tricky, it had never been attempted for American pressings of the LP. Naturally, Sean Magee and the team perfected this and the garbled message is heard as originally intended on the remastered Sgt. Pepper LP.

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Taxman
  2. Eleanor Rigby
  3. I'm Only Sleeping
  4. Love You To/Here, There And Everywhere
  5. Yellow Submarine
  6. She Said She Said
  7. Good Day Sunshine
  8. And Your Bird Can Sing
  9. For No One
  10. Doctor Robert
  11. I Want To Tell You
  12. Got To Get You Into My Life
  13. Tomorrow Never Knows


Product Details

  • Vinyl (November 13, 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Capitol
  • ASIN: B0041KVYIW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,182 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #595 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The Beatles' overall achievement is rivaled by no one. In a course of only seven years, they produced 12 and ½ albums (I don't count Yellow Submarine as a full album), one of which was a double album, and enough independent singles to make up two other albums. Very prolific, and the single most important band ever to grace the rock'n'roll scene. There is countless debates on what is their most important, but to me every one of those albums from "Rubber Soul" on (excepting "Yellow Submarine") is a self-contained masterpiece.

That being said, "Revolver" gives us the most balanced view of The Beatles that we ever get. Everything that made The Beatles great is here in the right proportions. We have the three tracks of Harrison, including an Indian song of his, we have the ultimate Ringo song (everyone should know what song I'm talking about here), we have Paul's melodious love songs that would overwhelm his solo career, and we have the standard Lennon experimentation. On no other record do we get such a clear picture of what each Beatle brought into the equation. Everyone of them shine for their individual talents. The direct opposite of this is The White Album, when The Beatles were in the process of breaking up.

In terms of artistic growth (remember, this was released almost a year after Help!, which was released August 6, 1965 and this August 5, 1966) we knew The Beatles were onto something. It foreshadows everything that will happen on
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Format: Audio CD
Quite simply the greatest album by the greatest band of all-time. A mind boggling collage of perfect songcraft and sheer sonic joy, Revolver, like its predecessor Rubber Soul, stunned the pop world when released in 1966.
In terms of Beatle evolution, Revolver catches the Fabs in the midst of their most perfect phase -- more sophisticated than the Mop-Top years of 1963-64, yet more restrained than the experimental Later Years. Lush psychedelic tones flourish throughout, enhancing, yet never overwhelming the colorful song textures. Witness George's painstaking backward guitar solo on "I'm Only Sleeping" for a textbook example of innovation with restraint. Mesmerizing rhythmic structures, which pop-up all over, may well be the most inventive of the band's career. Ringo's percussive tom rolls transform John's single-chord mind-bender "Tomorrow Never Knows" into the most hypnotic three-minutes of acid-drenched pleasure ever recorded. Never have Beatle guitars sounded so bright, trebly and as bitingly distorted as they do on "And Your Bird Can Sing" and "She Said, She Said". On the gentle flipside are the baroque sophistication of "For No One" and the epic neo-classicism of "Eleanor Rigby". Gently washed in the mournful hues of George Martin's perfectly scored string arrangement, "Eleanor" emerges as Paul's most mature and, quite possibly, most beautiful song. Sing-a-long classics "Good Day Sunshine" and "Yellow Submarine" prove that fun was indeed still fashionable in the Swingin' Summer of '66.
Every aspect of Revolver--from the biting social commentary of "Taxman" to the childish joyride of "Yellow Submarine"-- clicks so perfectly.
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Format: Audio CD
It's actually very difficult to try and review a record from 1966 36 years later and judge it by standards of 1966.
Can you put yourselves in the shoes of a 17 year old kid in 1966? You just walked home from the local record shop and you're sitting down in front of the turntable. You slide your thumbnail along the plastic to open up the album and remove the LP from its paper jacket. You carefully hold the edges of the record with your palms and set it down, pulling the tone arm over to drop the needle into the groove.
The guitar stylings of George Harrison are what you hear first, as "Taxman" plays through your phono speakers, a great new Beatles tune indeed. After listening to more of the record you hear the heady symbolism of "Eleanor Rigby", the Beach Boys-like harmony of "Here, There and Everywhere", the horns-rich McCartney kicker "Got To Get You Into My Life" and the Lennon acid-trip-set-to-music "Tomorrow Never Knows".
Yes, there are many other great tunes on this album...radio favorites like "Good Day Sunshine" and "Yellow Submarine". And other greats like "She Said, She Said", a song based on something Peter Fonda is said to have said to John Lennon, "I know what it's like to be dead". How about "And Your Bird Can Sing" and Lennon's beautiful "I'm Only Sleeping".
And at the age of 17 in 1966, you do not yet know that "Got To Get You Into My Life" would help usher in a genre of music known as the Chicago-sound with bands like The Buckinghams, The Ides of March, The American Breed, Chicago and more using rich brass harmony.
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