Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Rewire: Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destruc tive Behavior
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Author Richard O’Connor just combined two of my favorite books: Daniel Hahneman’s THINKING, FAST AND SLOW and Eckhart Tolle’s THE POWER OF NOW. Not only did he combine them, he did it quite well, making it his own. This was an enjoyable, insightful read that I highly recommend.

Ouch!” That’s the first thing you’ll say. O’Connor lists out the bad habits—one by one. At first, you may not think you are that bad off. Then you flip the page. And another page. He’s got your number. Several of your numbers. Then O’Connor goes into detail of how we minimalize our bad habits, thinking they aren’t that destructive, and then he systematically proves how they are bad. Yeah, “ouch!”

But read on, fellow readers! You wouldn’t be looking at this book if you didn’t want to change. O’Connor doesn’t leave you in the heaps of disappointment; he shows various methods to change. He gives the scientific background of what works and doesn’t work, and then offers exercises to change. My favorite, as alluded to before, is mindfulness techniques and awareness. But this isn’t all breathing and meditating. O’Connor offers plenty of techniques for the “I don’t want this ‘ah-om’ stuff” folks (though the ‘ah-om’ stuff works—trust me…and trust O’Connor). He talks about journaling, and many other hearty techniques that are easy to implement and rid those nasty ol’ habits.

Bottom line: we all do things that we want to change or eliminate. O’Connor blends the best of what is out there and makes it practical, real, and obtainable. This is a great book that’ll give you a better life.

Thanks to Hudson Street Press and Penguin Group for providing this to me electronically for review.
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on August 11, 2014
WOW! I got this book from the library and read it in one weekend . . . then I went back and re-read several chapters. As someone who suffers from genetic depression and anxiety, at times it felt as if the author was addressing me directly. I have to admit that the author isn't handing out band-aids here -- there are no EASY fixes -- but what he has to say is very, very interesting.
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on September 2, 2014
Your psychological paradigms control your behavior. There are many useful tricks for procrastination and dieting but, without changes in your unconscious paradigms, your efforts at change will fail. There is no way to beat your subconscious. You must change your subconscious paradigms according to its rules. This book discusses these paradigms by explaining their structure (ego, super ego, id) and reviews common behavioral problems in this light with case histories. In this book, you'll find your issues with solutions.
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I came across Aristotle's insight decades ago and (with mixed results) have since tried to apply it in my life. Frankly, it has not been easy to replace bad habits with good habits, avoid or overcome addictions with moderation or abstinence, and minimize (if not eliminate) self-destructive behavior. What's the problem?

According to Richard O'Connor, "Too often, our behavior takes on a life of its own and turns into a pit we cannot crawl out of, even if we're aware of what makes us miserable. Then there are self-destructive patterns that we don't see but that still hurt us over and over." Most humans seem to have two brains rather than one and they do not work very well together. They compete for control of our decision-making process. "The bottom line is that there are powerful forces within us that resist change, even when we can clearly see what would be good for us. Bad habits die heard. It seems as if we have two brains, one wanting the best for us, and the other digging in its heels in a desperate, often unconscious, effort to hold on to the status quo. New knowledge about how the brain works is helping us to understand this divided self, giving us guidance and hope that we can do more to overcome our fears and resistance."

So what we have here is everything that O'Connor has learned thus far about what the brain is, what it does, and what it can do as well as an explanation of how his reader can replace bad habits with good habits, avoid or overcome addictions with moderation or abstinence, and minimize (if not eliminate) self-destructive behavior.

These are among the dozens of passages of greatest interest and value to me, also listed to suggest the scope of his coverage:

o Inside the Mind (Pages 11-16)
o How and why expectations create our world (23-27)
o Fear Incognito (47-73)
o Mindfulness (67-69)
o Rebels Without Causes (75-96)
o Rebelling Against Yourself (86-91)
o Self-defeating consequences of acting on feelings of entitlement (97-114)
o Self-esteem and self-ccontrol (127-128)
o Developing willpower (123-131)
o Self-Hate (133-153)
o Chronic Trauma Syndrome (160-165)
o The Vicious Circle of Stress (201-202 & 206-208)
o Addiction (209-220)
o Depression 223-229)
o Anxiety (230-233)
o Overcoming self-destructive habits in yourself (247-255)

Richard O'Connor is spot-on: "Nobody's perfect; we're all likely to procrastinate at times, break our diets, ignore unpleasant truths. But we can choose to do this deliberately, to give ourselves a little deserved break before we get back to reality. And we absolutely can develop greater control over our most self-destructive patterns, and in the process become wiser and start to feel like the conscious and thoughtful part of ourselves is in charge of our lives."

I am deeply grateful to him for the wealth of information, insights, and counsel he provides in this volume. As a new year rapidly approaches, I will renew my commitment personal growth and professional development. Thanks to him, I and feel much better prepared for the challenges that await in months and years to come.
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on September 13, 2014
This is an impressive book by an impressive therapist. Dr. O'Connor has written an excellent book that is beyond the typical self-help book. He uses his many years of experience, skill and knowledge of neuroscience research to explain why we have bad habits, including addictions, and what we can do to change them.

Dr. O'Connor is very honest and open about how difficult it is to change behavior, especially addictions. He explains the reasons for, mechanisms of. and methods for changing bad habits, ranging from procrastination (which one can probably deal with on his own) to severe addiction (which does usually require professional aid). His advice is excellent and places this book far above the self-help genre.

Dr. O'Connor's knowledge of neuroscience is amazing. He understands the hard science behind the studies used to support and explain his book. Very well done.

Something else, and most impressive of all about Dr. O'Connor, is his sympathy and compassion for all those who suffer, and his desire to help those who really, really want to change for the better.
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on October 12, 2014
One of the best of popular science books in neuroscience area.Thanks to Richard O'connor for providing a good framework of understanding the power of 'unconcious' in our decision making process.I liked the recommendations put in for use at the end of all chapters more than a summary of ideas stated.It helped me personally to understand how I am wired and what to do for a rewire ! It is a good reference to understand the cause and effect relationship in our lives and the role of brain holding the wheel.
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on April 28, 2016
I am 1/3 the way through this book and I can tell tay everyone in my family needs to read this book! Get back control of your life, your thoughts etc! Can't wait to finish the book and re -read it. Like someone else said, the first couple of chapters are tough and make you feel hopeless but by pointing out and recognizing these problems then applying the exercises, should help to center your soul and your life!!!
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on March 4, 2015
He had some good ideas, but some I thought were strange as well. I've been trying to adjust my eating habits and one of his suggestions was to imagine malts, cake, etc. as filled with maggots. That's not useful, and it's not appropriate for well-rounded eating.
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on March 17, 2016
I bought this in paperback for a friend after buying it on Kindle for myself and was inspired to buy it on the strength of his Understanding Depression book. I came into contact with this author when researching Zen and depression. That he works within a "mindfulness" framework is a huge plus. A wise book that helps one understand why we think and do things (and how, realistically, we can rewire and think and do things differently). So much of coaching is about "yes, you can change, just do it." But it doesn't work like that. I got great insights from this book on adult children of alcoholics, narcissists, post-traumatic stress disorder to name three that have proved very useful for understanding people close to me. All in all, a practical and accessible book — and, of course, wise.
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on April 25, 2015
This book is a good introduction to basic modern brain science, neuroplasticity, anatomy, psychology (esp. of neurosis), for someone who knows nothing about these subjects, For anyone with a nodding acqaintance with them, the material will be repetition.
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