Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great footnotes
The footnotes on this text are great. A lot of the wording can be heavy for a first read-through of Aristotle, and Kennedy does his best to make Aristotle more accessible to people who are new to Rhetoric.
Published on October 3, 2008 by laura157

versus
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misleading link leads to wrong edition
Careful where you click! You think you're ordering the Kennedy translation, right? But if you click on the link to "used" under "formats," Amazon will take you to an entirely different book - an outdated translation with no footnotes or critical apparatus, published not by Oxford Univ. Press but by "ReadaClassic.com" - without warning you. Really frustrating when you get...
Published 18 months ago by Odradek


Most Helpful First | Newest First

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misleading link leads to wrong edition, December 27, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Careful where you click! You think you're ordering the Kennedy translation, right? But if you click on the link to "used" under "formats," Amazon will take you to an entirely different book - an outdated translation with no footnotes or critical apparatus, published not by Oxford Univ. Press but by "ReadaClassic.com" - without warning you. Really frustrating when you get the wrong book after waiting 10 days for it to arrive!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This is not the George Kennedy translation, November 19, 2012
By 
Eric Luttrell (Eugene, Oregon United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Rhetoric (Paperback)
This review is for the "Readaclassic" publication (check the publisher, not the title, descriptions, or reviews). This is NOT the George Kennedy translation. It's the W. D. Ross 1908 translation that is available for free on the internet. All descriptions and reviews on the Amazon page refer to the Kennedy 1991 edition, BUT THIS IS NOT IT. There are NO footnotes, NO commentary, NO introduction or preface, and NO way to cite the text. That means students can't use this version for research. Essentially, this publisher simply copied texts available online, pasted it into his own document, and "published" it without the usual publication data. I understand that Readaclassic is just looking to make a quick buck from someone else's labor, but I'm disappointed that Amazon.com is allowing con artists to flood the market with cheap, mislabeled fakes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great footnotes, October 3, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The footnotes on this text are great. A lot of the wording can be heavy for a first read-through of Aristotle, and Kennedy does his best to make Aristotle more accessible to people who are new to Rhetoric.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful book for any rhetorical scholar, June 3, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
It was definitely definitely worth the price. I knew very little about Aristotle at the beginning of the grad level course I was taking. I bought this book on the chance it would be beneficial to my understanding of the required texts. It worked. Kennedy's analysis provided valuable insight that I wouldn't have gained from our normal textbook. Must buy :-) :-)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Kennedy Makes Aristotle Easy, May 30, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I received the George Kennedy translation when I ordered the book. I bought this book for a college rhetoric class, and it's one of the few textbooks I've kept! If you've ever read Aristotle, you know that he can be a tedious read. What's more, is that this text was essentially his "lecture notes," so it's not exactly cleaned-up. Fortunately for us students, Kennedy's summaries preceding each chapter and the footnotes following each page proved absolutely invaluable. He highlighted key concepts, revealed ambiguities (e.g. the enthymeme from a syllogism), and did all that in a more familiar, vernacular language where possible. If you're reading Aristotle, get this book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Logic, human character and emotions, June 3, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Rhetoric (Paperback)
"Rhetoric may be defined as the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion" (pg. 4).
Logic, human character & emotions deep understanding are the key ingredients of Aristotle's receipt and, despite it was written quite some time ago, it will never be out-of-date for all of us who are involved into human interactions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boo Boo, November 18, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Boo, this sucks only buy it if you have a crazy profresor that makes you buy it, waste of money, aristotle good bye.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars SECOND EDITION ARISTOTLE'S ON RHETORIC TRANSLATED BY GEORGE A. KENNEDY, December 24, 2010
By 
Gary Moore (Midland, Texas United States) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
SECOND EDITION ARISTOTLE'S ON RHETORIC TRANSLATED BY GEORGE A. KENNEDY
If this is the `scholarly edition' that is `the most faithful English version ever published' and `informed by the best modern scholarship', it is vastly disappointing has not only self-censured from the first edition references to Martin Heidegger on pages ix and 124, note 7, as well as the index, but totally ignored the publication of GA 18 Grundbegriff der aristotelischen Philosophie by V. Klostermann in 2002 and translated by Metchalf and Tanzer as BASIC CONCEPTS OF ARISTOTELIAN PHILOSOPHY, Indiana university Press, 2009, which deals extensively in detail with Aristotle's RHETORIC starting at page 78 and going to page 176 in the main. In the first edition, Kennedy uses Heidegger to raise the philosophical importance of the RHETORIC. In the second edition he is doing something else, maybe hiding with his tail between his legs because someone accused him of being a Nazi lover. The political aspect of the RHETORIC, though, is overwhelming in its importance, and Aristotle's own declaration that it can be used for good or evil is evaded and downgraded by Kennedy. Heidegger's fundamental insight relevant here, which is truly fearful in its perception, is that all philosophy, all human knowing, is some kind of political process of trying to persuade someone else of what is the truth of the case of the facts of the matter. Even talking about a rock, then, since you are talking to someone else, has thereby a political aspect since you are trying to make a change in the social structure of knowledge.
***
Kennedy's censorship therefore SUPPORTS Heidegger's illustration from Jacob Burckhardt with his statement from PARMENIDES, `Here lies concealed the primordial ground of that feature Jacob Burckhardt presented for the first time in its full bearing and manifoldness: the frightfulness, the horribleness, the atrociousness of the Greek đüëéò. Such is the rise and fall of man in his historical abode of essence - apolis -far exceeding abodes, homeless, as Sophocles calls man [Antigone]. it is not by chance man is spoken of in this way in Greek tragedy. For the possibility and necessity of "tragedy" itself has its single source in the conflictual essence of aletheia. There is only GREEK tragedy and no other besides it. Only the essence of Being as experienced by the Greeks has this primordial character that `the tragic' becomes a necessity here. In the introduction of his lectures on the history of Greek culture, Jacob Burckhardt knowingly inserts a thesis he heard as a student from his teacher in classical philology at Berlin, Bockh, and it runs as follows: "the Hellenes were more unhappy than most people think." Burckhardt's presentation of the Greeks . . . was constituted entirely on this insight . . .', page 90, translated by Schuwer and Rojcewicz, Indiana University Press, 1992[Vittorio Klostermann 1982, GA 54].
***
Anyone familiar with the savagery of the unrepublican, essentially unconstitutional in our modern sense, legally unfettered Athenian democracy in Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War that the American founding fathers and English parliamentarians hated so much should be depressed by Kennedy's evasion of Heidegger's challenge to Kennedy's bright and pretty picture of things as they are EVEN AS NOW our own political figures are describing modern American politics as self-cannibalism [Senator Arlen Specter, see 'In final Senate speech, Specter slams political `cannibalism'].
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Rhetoric
Rhetoric by Aristotle (Paperback - September 18, 2010)
$5.95 $5.36
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.