Qty:1
$73.87 + $7.49 shipping
In stock. Usually ships within 4 to 5 days.
Sold by allgoes
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Rich Dad Cashflow 101 board game (VHS/Audio Tape)


List Price: $229.99
Price: $73.87 + $7.49 shipping
You Save: $156.12 (68%)
In stock.
Usually ships within 4 to 5 days.
Ships from and sold by allgoes.
  • Learn to practice real world investing
  • Teaches accounting, finance, and investing
  • Includes 3 cassettes and one VHS tape.
  • Makes learning fun
  • Recommended for adults and children ages 10 and up
2 new from $69.99

Frequently Bought Together

Rich Dad Cashflow 101 board game (VHS/Audio Tape) + CASHFLOW 202
Price for both: $123.37

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together
  • CASHFLOW 202 $49.50


Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 3.5 x 16.2 inches ; 3.5 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 5.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • Shipping Advisory: This item must be shipped separately from other items in your order. Additional shipping charges will not apply.
  • ASIN: B0002R5IKI
  • Item model number: 4098375
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 10 years and up
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #182,694 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Discontinued by manufacturer: Yes
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Product Description

From the Manufacturer

Learn how to get out of the Rat Race and onto the Fast Track where your money works for you instead of you working hard for your money. Use this game to practice real world investing with play money. CASHFLOW 101 is an educational board game that teaches accounting, finance, and investing at the same time - and makes learning fun. This educational program, CASHFLOW 101, includes the board game CASHFLOW 101 and three CDs which reveal the lessons of CASHFLOW 101. CASHFLOW 101 is recommended for adults and children age 10 and older.

Product Description

Learn how to get out of the Rat Race and onto the fast track where your money works for you instead of you working hard for your money. Use this game to practice real world investing with play money. Cashflow 101 is an educational board game that teaches accounting, finance, and investing at the same time. It makes learning fun. Cashflow 101 is recommended for adults and children age 10 and older.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

I look forward to investing in this game myself.
S. Cincu
She and her husband enjoyed playing so much they invited several sets of friends to play the game with them.
D. Sinclair
This game will teach you the foundation of financial success.
Stini

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

121 of 123 people found the following review helpful By Throckmorton Scribblemonger on October 17, 2006
I've played this at least a dozen times, and have to admit that the game itself is imperfect. However, it HAS taught me a number of things which Kiyosaki does not make clear in his books, and is essential practise for anyone wanting to take the next step after first having read the book.

My tips:

1. Read the book first before playing, otherwise it will probably all seem boring and too weird.

2. The game makes clear: The way to make passive cashflow is NOT on the positive cash flow from rental properties. (Suprised?) The rental income only secures the property, which you must be able to sell for a profit. The money made on the gains from selling the houses is then used to buy businesses - these are what give you the passive cashflow to finally "get out of the rat race."

3. Take the income statement sheet you've used playing the game and fill it out for your own life. You'll be surprised how little your free cash flow, and passive income really is. Use the excel worksheet to track your progess month to month. An excellent motivator.

Game Design Problems (and Fixes):

1. The cards which allow you to buy insanely low priced shares of stocks for $1, which you can be certain will go up to $20 or $40 later when the right card comes up. Life is not that predictable. Remove these cards from the deck.

2. Other players will frequently advise on what is a good deal or not. This is a mistake, because it doesn't allow other players to MAKE mistakes, and takes much of the fun out of the game. Instead, allow each player to make their choice to buy a property (or not) WITHOUT input, and only after let the other players give their opinion on this course of action.

3. The game takes a loooong time with 5-6 players.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
113 of 116 people found the following review helpful By R. B. Sisko on January 9, 2007
Like my title suggests, try the software version first. It allows you to play with multiple players on or off-line or vs multiple computer players. Plus the software version is cheaper. You can even use the multiplayer mode for yourself and use the different players to try different strategies. I found this technique very educational. I have the board game also to play with my wife and others and have yet to crack the wrapper. I stongly suggest going to the Rich Dad website and getting the software version before investing in the board game. The one draw back is that you must have the cd in your drive while playing, so if you want to load it on multiple computers you can only play it on the comnputer that has the cd.
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
131 of 139 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Robb on December 29, 2004
I bought the game a year ago, and have played it at least six times with 2 - 5 players. I like to get some friends together, eat a meal, and then spend a couple of hours playing the game. It's interesting to see how my friends approach financial decisions in the game – some are confident, others are very cautious.

This is a good way to help you think in a financially healthy way. You see that spending money on “doo-dads” doesn’t help your bottom line, that borrowing from the bank is sometimes necessary to purchase a good property, that the stock market can dramatically grow - or shrink - your capital, what to look for in rental properties, and you get an appreciation for the “big picture” – that you have to work toward increasing your passive income and not sweat little expenses. It’s all about helping you and your friends train your minds to think “passive income is preferable to a paycheck from my employer”.

Some people have criticized the game for using dice (like Monopoly), for not allowing people to decline the purchase of a “doo-dad”, and for having a bias toward using large stock market profits to catapult players into the fast track. The game is not perfect, it’s not identical to real life, and there will forever be ways to improve it.

Cashflow succeeds in it’s mission to teach you and your friends some of the roads to financial freedom.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
552 of 612 people found the following review helpful By Tim Ostrom on December 12, 2004
No, I'm not the wealthy real estate investor that is going to tell you what you really need to learn how to become wealthy... but I can identify a few things that won't help (and unfortunately, many are in this game). Like the previous reviewer noted, a lot depends on luck (a whole lot). But what's worse is that you can get lucky with things that will never really happen. For example, when you draw and opportunity card that allows you to buy some stock and it gives you a trading range (i.e. OK4U is selling at $5/share and has a trading range of $5-$40/share.) Who would not invest in this if you knew what it would be worth later? In the "real world", however, you will never have this type of information (absent a crystal ball).

This is my biggest problem with the game, because after playing it a lot it is very clear that buying these types of stocks and then selling them when the price goes up for huge profits is the best way to get your hands on enough cash to invest in the amount of real estate it would take to get you on the "fast track". This is not the lesson that the game should be teaching (just like the lesson of getting lucky) for people to become wealthy. Robert Kiyosaki even advocates in several of his books how stocks are risky and unreliable b/c of the baby boomers, enron-like companies, yada-yada-yada... and then he includes them as a necessity to winning a game.

If you're like me, you bought or are considering buying this game because you think it will be one of the best ways to condition yourself to think and act in a way that will create wealth. And like me, you either are or will be disappointed if you buy the game and have already learned the basic concept of creating wealth through real estate.
Read more ›
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xd8f31890)

Want to discover more products? You may find many from cheap accounting software shopping list.