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Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money--That the Poor and the Middle Class Do Not! (Miniature Edition) Hardcover – Abridged, April 7, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0762434275 ISBN-10: 0762434279 Edition: Min

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Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money--That the Poor and the Middle Class Do Not! (Miniature Edition) + Rich Dad's CASHFLOW Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom + Rich Dad Poor Dad: What The Rich Teach Their Kids About Money That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Running Press Miniature Editions; Min edition (April 7, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0762434279
  • ISBN-13: 978-0762434275
  • Product Dimensions: 3.1 x 2.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (192 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #47,851 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert T. Kiyosaki is an investor, teacher, entrepreneur, and bestselling author. His books include Cashflow Quadrant, Rich Dad's Guide to Investing, Rich Dad Poor Dad for Teens, Rich Dad's Retire Young Retire Rich, and Increase Your Financial IQ. Robert lives in Phoenix, Arizona.

More About the Author

Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad Poor Dad - the international runaway bestseller that has held a top spot on the New York Times bestsellers list for over six years - is an investor, entrepreneur and educator whose perspectives on money and investing fly in the face of conventional wisdom. He has, virtually single-handedly, challenged and changed the way tens of millions, around the world, think about money.In communicating his point of view on why 'old' advice - get a good job, save money, get out of debt, invest for the long term, and diversify - is 'bad' (both obsolete and flawed) advice, Robert has earned a reputation for straight talk, irreverence and courage.Rich Dad Poor Dad ranks as the longest-running bestseller on all four of the lists that report to Publisher's Weekly - The New York Times, Business Week, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today - and was named "USA Today's #1 Money Book" two years in a row. It is the third longest-running 'how-to' best seller of all time.Translated into 51 languages and available in 109 countries, the Rich Dad series has sold over 27 million copies worldwide and has dominated best sellers lists across Asia, Australia, South America, Mexico and Europe. In 2005, Robert was inducted into Amazon.com Hall of Fame as one of that bookseller's Top 25 Authors. There are currently 26 books in the Rich Dad series.In 2006 Robert teamed up with Donald Trump to co-author Why We Want You To Be Rich - Two Men - One Message. It debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestsellers list.Robert writes a bi-weekly column - 'Why the Rich Are Getting Richer' - for Yahoo! Finance and a monthly column titled 'Rich Returns' for Entrepreneur magazine.Prior to writing Rich Dad Poor Dad, Robert created the educational board game CASHFLOW 101 to teach individuals the financial and investment strategies that his rich dad spent years teaching him. It was those same strategies that allowed Robert to retire at age 47.Today there are more that 2,100 CASHFLOW Clubs - game groups independent of the Rich Dad Company - in cities throughout the world.Born and raised in Hawaii, Robert Kiyosaki is a fourth-generation Japanese-American. After graduating from college in New York, Robert joined the Marine Corps and served in Vietnam as an officer and helicopter gunship pilot. Following the war, Robert went to work in sales for Xerox Corporation and, in 1977, started a company that brought the first nylon and Velcro 'surfer wallets' to market. He founded an international education company in 1985 that taught business and investing to tens of thousands of students throughout the world.  In 1994 Robert sold his business and, through his investments, was able to retire at the age of 47. During his short-lived retirement he wrote Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Customer Reviews

Expected to receive full size book.
Susan K. Nystuen
I had no idea a miniature book was so small.
Jeffrey Meier
The book was 2 inches by 3 inches!!
Thomas J. Kee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Greg Powers on November 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is NOT the real "Rich Dad - Poor Dad" book. Just look at the photos I posted of it and you'll see the real size. It's only 2 3/4" by 3 1/4" in size! It does NOT contain all the text that the original book does. It's a rip off!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By B. Willman on June 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
It has always amazed and eluded me to see many of the worst books on the market for Real Estate and other forms of investing are "best sellers". Kiyosaki like Donald Trump are both examples of good marketing and motivational self professed guru's that offer poor advice. In this book, Kiyosaki's attempts to pass off his fictitious life story of lessons learned as a work of non-fiction. To add insult to injury, he gives financial advice throughout the book that is ridiculous and in some cases criminal.

Everyone who gave 5 stars to this book either has a financial incentive to do so, or has no clue that they have been duped by another B.S. artist. I highly recommend searching for John T. Reed's review of Rich Dad, Poor Dad.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By surfergirl on June 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When ordering this i noted it was a hard copy version. Did not notice the fine print of "miniature edition" so I received a book not much bigger than a postage stamp! maybe 2 x 2 inches at most!!! pay attention is my advice...horrible!
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By K. Suh on April 6, 2009
Format: Hardcover
If there's one thing this book doesn't do, is promise you absolutely that you will be rich. Instead, it motivates you to try and look at life, your career, and how you spend and manage money a little differently. However, a real financial education - courses you could take at a community college that teach you how to manage risk, understand investing, real estate, etc etc are ultimately necessary for success.

Interesting anecdotes and stories abound, and honestly they're the best teaching tools used, regardless of their truthiness. You'll learn how to manage money, how corporations work, and why owning a home could be the worst decision you ever make. However, there are a few stumbling blocks that really limit the usefulness of this book:

1. He doesn't full discuss how corporations - and their alternatives - work in detail. He also says that corporations can be used as tax shelters. That's not primarily why corporations exist. They exist to limit the liability of the investors. The major disadvantage with corporations is that earnings are actually taxed twice - once when the earnings are calculated, and again when the investors are paid out. You could also say that they're taxed again when you buy something (sales tax) or when you buy property/investments with the money gained. The point is, corporations are not some magic formula that allow people to keep money that the government would otherwise take away.

2. Risk is vastly understated with many investments. He does a good job of trying to slap sense into how people incorrectly view the stock market - by likening dips in stock prices to a sale at a supermarket for toilet paper (as in, that's time to buy), but doesn't explain how securities investment should be done, or even how to evaluate risk.
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28 of 36 people found the following review helpful By W. Westlake on November 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover
He's a fraud. Yes I bought the book and curious I did a lot of searching on the Internet. Turns out the "Rich Dad" in Hawaii doesn't exit. Also Kiyosaki's real father, the "Poor Dad" from his book was very well off. He comes from money and has a "gift" for selling his Jibber Jabber to the masses. Just a year or so ago there was a big rift between he and his wife and their partner and the partner told all. He lives in Phoenix (Paradise Valley if I remember correctly), not far from where I live.

Honestly, he makes his money from selling gimmicks. Ask yourself, if YOU had the great "secret" to financial wealth, why would you bother traveling the country doing the seminar circuit hawking books and board games extolling the principles of wealth generation? If you felt so grateful for that gift of knowledge wouldn't you just want to give it away? Post it all on a website for the world to read?

Before wasting your money on another get-rich gimmick, think before you click.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Hakkeem on June 16, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Read during two extended trips in a waiting room. The financial advice mixes obvious facts with nonsense, which can be confirmed in the Jonathan Clements review in the Wall Street Journal ("Rich Men, Poor Advice: Their Book Is Hot, But Their Financial Tips Aren't") or the Rob Walker overview in Slate ("If I Were a Rich Dad: Why millions buy Rich Dad, Poor Dad's nonsense").

Of more concern to me was the moral bile. The whole lesson of the book is that rich people should be idolized, poor people are ignorant, the government is stupid and out to get you, and if you work for a living you're a fool. Rich dad brags about underpaying his employees and then blames them for their own low wages. In setting up the poor dad as a loser and the rich dad as a hero, he includes the following nonsense:

"Poor people are more greedy than rich people."

"Don't listen to poor people."

"People with low self-esteem can never be rich."

"For example, [poor dad] would say, 'The love of money is the root of all evil.' [Rich dad], 'The lack of money is the root of all evil.'"

"My poor dad would also say, 'I'm not interested in money,' or 'Money doesn't matter.' My rich dad always said, 'Money is power.'"
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