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Rich Dad's Cashflow Quadrant: Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Freedom Paperback – May 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0446677479 ISBN-10: 0446677477 Edition: Later Printing

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

A 4th-generation Japanese American, Kiyosaki was educated in New York before joining the U.S. Marines and serving in Vietnam as a helicopter gunship pilot. In 1977 he founded a company producing Nylon and Velcro 'surfer' wallets which became a multi-million dollar business.

From AudioFile

This is one of the best of the Rich Dad Poor Dad audios. The core idea in this series is that being an investor or business owner gives one more freedom and a higher upside than being someone else's employee or being an owner-operator of a business. With vivid personal stories, the authors show that many people, including the author's "poor" dad (an educational administrator), choose working for others because of insecurity or misguided trust in organizations. One builds true financial freedom by accumulating assets that make money, especially rental property. Though others have offered this advice, it's clearer and more potent here, and worth listening to many times if your financial insecurity or complacency needs a push. T.W. © AudioFile 2003, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Series: Rich Dad
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Business Plus; Later Printing edition (May 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446677477
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446677479
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (503 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #136,185 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

It was easy to read and very simple to understand the power of financial education.
Josh G
This is good reading for anyone willing to change the way he/she thinks about money and success so that financial freedom can be achieved.
A. Petrotchenkov
Robert has a way of changing people's paradigms and belief systems about how wealth is made.
Stephen G. Cullen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

467 of 493 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
Repetition is the source of mastery, and The Cash Flow Quadrant takes the excellent thinking in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and builds to another level of detail. This information will increase what you learned in Rich Dad, Poor Dad and help you begin the transformation from a salaried or self-employed person into a business owner and investor.
The definitions of these four quadrants are important. As an employee, you have a job. As a self-employed person, you own a job. As a business owner you have a system (such as a franchise like McDonald's) that produces cash flow for you and others work for you. As an investor, your money works for you. Rich people are getting more than 70 percent of their cash flow and income by having money work for them.
One of the strengths of the book is that it deals with the subtle psychological differences among people in the four different quadrants, especially on subjects like security and freedom. Kiyosaki and Lechter then do a nice job of helping you understand the difference between risky and taking risk. The latter is a good idea, when you know what you are doing, and the former is always to be avoided.
The book is not dogmatic, pointing out that good results can be reached in a variety of ways. You have to decide which ones are right for you. In general, you are encouraged to move from the employee and self-employed side for your income to the business owner and investor side. Then, take your cash flow and expand it into investments.
Another of the strengths of the book is to make it clearer what the advantages of income property are. In these Internet stock-crazed days, many are looking only to stocks and missing good commercial property opportunities.
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172 of 182 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
Before reading and more importantly, following the advise in Cash Flow Quadrant, I was like most people in that awful "paycheck to paycheck" cycle, "thank God it's Friday" and oh no, today it's Sunday, back to the old grindstone tomorrow" RUT.I was astonished the other day to talk with someone who I thought was doing pretty well financially. This individual said that if he missed2 paychecks, he would be bankrupt! Then I remembered that was were I was before I read and used the concepts in Cash Flow Quadrant!I would also recommend Who Stole The American Dream, The E-Myth Revisited And Multiple Streams of Income.
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324 of 349 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
A friend recommended this book to me. I quote from the introduction "The CFQ was written for you if your life has come to a financial fork in the road." I read with enthusiasm for the first couple of chapters then the repetition in the text started to annoy. About half way it had become an irritation to the soul but I gritted my teeth and read on! By the end I was really, really, really steamed.
The author could have reduced the number of pages by (a) 25% by dedicating this book to his wife and stating that they were poor with no assets and living out of a vehicle and off friends' graces before becoming financially free several years later. (b) another 25% by eliminating the repetition. (c) another 25% by eliminating the repetitive diagrams especially the EBSI one. (d) did I mention the repetition?
Interestingly, while the book deals with their success in general terms, it does not say HOW they did it. Indeed, the author and his wife did not appear in their own cash flow quadrant since there is no place for U [my creation] meaning the Unemployed.
So the question remained, How did they go from U and destitute to B and I in the CFQ? The answer is real estate we are told. Ok, but how does one without a job or collateral secure funds to pay the required 10% deposit. We are carefully told NOT to break the law. Real estate is key but WHERE to buy seems to be a problem. The author was magically ably to buy huge portions of land cheaply and sell with massive profits. We learn that the author learned three invaluable methods of negotiation previously unknown to him but are carefully not told what these methods were.
We are told that a true B or business owner can leave his business for a year and return to find it still functioning and more profitable than when he left it.
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203 of 217 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 14, 2002
Format: Paperback
Not since "Who Stole the American Dream" by Burke Hodges has anone written a book that dispels the notion of go to college, get a job and work hard--ENT!Not since How to Make Nothing But Money, a NY times best seller by Dave DelDotto has anyone explained with clarity the power of paper; Real Estate, Tax Liens and Discound Mortgages.Self employment is the way to go and this book proves that the American Dream is ALIVE & WELL.In this decade and beyond, more money will be made in network marketing, real estate and the stock market than ever before.Anyone who wants to participate in that growth must read this book.I also recommend Wall Street Money Machine for the new Millenium for powerful cash flow strategies.
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146 of 156 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 31, 2003
Format: Paperback
In this second of the Rich Dad series, Kiyosaki explains the 4 quadrants and while being an E-employee is suicidal.
The theme is the same as the first book with Rich Dad Poor Dad comparisons. Then we learn why the rich become rich and why the poor are and stay poor.
Kiyosaki also discusses taxes and why the poor are paying so much more in taxes than they need be. RTK uses as an example his poor dad who was highly educated had a high income but was not wealthy because of his Cash Flow patterns. By contrast his Rich Dad had an average education, made less money than his poor father but was wealthier because he learned how to have money work for him instead of working for money as so many do.
Cash Flow Quadrant is a excellent book for anyone who wants to break the work for money, live paycheck to paycheck syndrome.
Question: What would happen to you if you and your spouse both lost your jobs?
If you make money work for you as espoused by RTK in Cash Flow Quadrant you will realize that ir really doesn't matter. But if all you have is a job---oouch!!!
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