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207 of 217 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best I Have Read
I've read close to 60 books on Personal Finance, Investing, and How-To-Be-Rich-types and this one is one of the best I have read. I have enjoyed Robert Kiyosaki's other books, but this one is the best, in my opinion, because he reviews many of his principles from his previous books just in case this may be the first of his books that you are reading.
This is not a...
Published on May 2, 2001 by Paul Polanco

versus
279 of 303 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Investor Beware!
One of the most challenging things about learning to use your money wisely is avoiding the plethora of bad advice available. This book is a perfect example of something that is seemingly innocuous which, if the advice is followed, will certainly lead to a lot of financial missteps.

For example, Kiyosaki discusses buying rental properties and discusses a...
Published on September 11, 2004 by Adam T. McClure


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207 of 217 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best I Have Read, May 2, 2001
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
I've read close to 60 books on Personal Finance, Investing, and How-To-Be-Rich-types and this one is one of the best I have read. I have enjoyed Robert Kiyosaki's other books, but this one is the best, in my opinion, because he reviews many of his principles from his previous books just in case this may be the first of his books that you are reading.
This is not a *HOW-TO* book on HOW to become wealthy or which steps to take to become wealthy. Like the author states, this book is about the INVESTOR, not specific strategies. To become truly wealthy you have to do two things. First, you NEED to change how you think, not just about money but about all areas of your life. Why go after riches if your marriage is in trouble or you don't spend enough time with your children? Secondly, you NEED to take different actions. If your last 5 years were miserable, then your next 5 years will be the same unless you DO something different. If at least 95% of the people in this country are not wealthy then you cannot do what 95% of people do. You have to do what the other 5% do; people WILL tell you you are crazy or what you are doing won't work. This happened to me and I am GLAD I did not listen to those people who still work at a job (I don't).
Most people do not Incorporate, most people do not invest in mutual funds and stocks correctly (they buy high and sell low), most people do not know how to buy real estaste, and most people know little about taxes, accounting, and personal finance. If one book was to be written about all those subjects in a general sense, it would still be thousands of pages long.
Robert's genius is that with his "Rich Dad/Poor Dad" metaphor, he gets the average reader to realize that it is not some magic formula or some great unattainable secret, but that it is our responsibility to go out and learn what the rich do and WHY they do it.
I never thought I would read a book about the Investor that would have given me this many new ideas. A must have for those who want to get out of the "rat race."
Beware the negative reviews regarding this book because they are written by people who "don't get it." You either "get it or you don't." Reviews written by people who have not read the book and have not been there are a waste of your time.
Like I said, I've been there, I own and have read this book twice already. People WILL put you down in obvious or subtle ways if you go for your dreams. Don't listen to the 95%, listen to the 5% that have made it.
Good luck and may all your dreams come true.
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543 of 583 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for those who want to be Financially Independent, June 24, 2000
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
This book continues from where Kiyosaki left off in Cashflow Quadrant, his 2nd book in the trilogy (now complete with Rich Dad's Guide to Investing).
In his 1st book Rich Dad Poor Dad, Kiyosaki addressed the differences in mindsets between the Rich and the Poor. Then, in his 2nd book Cashflow Quadrant, he spoke on the 4 quadrants from which one can generate income. To be wealthy, Kiyosaki recommended that we learn to generate our incomes from the "B" (Business-owner) and "I" (Investor) quadrant as opposed to the "E" (Employee) and "S" (Self-employed) quadrant.
In his 3rd book Rich Dad's Guide to Investing, Kiyosaki tells how he got started in his investment journey, starting with nothing, and in fact at one stage, with a negative net worth. Most of us, having read his first 2 books, would have wondered if we could have embarked on our journey to become financially independent without much resource at hand. In this book, Kiyosaki shows how anyone can get started and how it does not take money to make money. He teaches how time is more important than money; how investing in one's self and getting an education and experience precedes excessive cash; how having a plan is more important than being in a hurry to make money.
This is not a book for those who want hot tips and quick fixes. This is a book on mindsets. Kiyosaki plants ideas and provides a road-map. The reader must take the first step and learn to navigate his/her own journey.
What I like about this book, is Kiyosaki's concept of being an Ultimate Investor, a "selling-investor". The Ultimate Investor creates deals and businesses that the public hunger for and are willing to pay a premium to acquire a share of. With the internet, it has never been easier to create businesses and deals which one can take public.
As in all his other books, Kiyosaki's book is worth reading again and again. I would also recommend that one reads Robert Allen's Multiple Streams of Income in conjunction with Kiyosaki's Rich Dad's Guide to Investing.
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169 of 179 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the first two RD books, May 31, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
In this third of the of the RD/PD series Kiyosaki discusses investing. He shows how he went from a negative net worth to millions. He discusses the importance of having a plan. I like the fact that he emphasizes the importance of having a mission in your business. Kiyosaki also discusses the importance of having a safety net in your investment plan as a back up to the aggressive real estate, business and stock investing.
Good book and the best of the three in my opinion.
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247 of 267 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific Book, March 13, 2002
By 
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
All of the books in the Rich Dad are excellent. I also suggest How to make nothing but money by DelDeotto,
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279 of 303 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Investor Beware!, September 11, 2004
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
One of the most challenging things about learning to use your money wisely is avoiding the plethora of bad advice available. This book is a perfect example of something that is seemingly innocuous which, if the advice is followed, will certainly lead to a lot of financial missteps.

For example, Kiyosaki discusses buying rental properties and discusses a history of purchasing single-family houses and renting them out to achieve positive cash flow and financial independence in "Rich Dad/Poor Dad" (the book that started his repetitive Advisor series). However, from my own experience in real estate there are few single-family homes in areas with decent appreciation (Bay Area, Boston, NYC, Chicago, RTP-NC, etc.) that will be cash-flow positive without investing at least 25-30% equity into the deal. If I took my money and did a number of such deals and evaluated my annual Return on Equity (ROE always trumps ROI) I quickly realize I'm getting about 6% on my money. Wow! Is that "thinking with quick words" or "increasing my cash flow"? Not at a rate which will make me financially independent in less than 20 or 30 years. So how is this advice really better than the "buy an index fund and fugeddabout it" conventional wisdom of the financial services marketing community? Don't I get the same place in the same amount of time? When you factor in the hassle of tenants and maintenance of real property the index fund is looking like a no-brainer!

I own 11 rental units and a million-dollar home and I can say simply that there are few opportunities out there that haven't already been discovered and exactly NONE that don't have a measure of risk. Kiyosaki does everyone a disservice by encouraging them to seek financial freedom then giving vague and erroneous advice. His real estate recommendations are dangerous and understate the tremendous toll on your time and energy rentals can take. His equity investment advice is so vague as to lack coherent value.

If you want to make money consistently you need to have a real plan. Not "I want to be wealthy in 10 years" but rather a keen understanding of your strategy, entry and exit criterion for each investment, ability to roll with the punches, and continous monitoring of your plan to find the flaws. Most of the time your assumptions were wrong or you left out a critical variable. Knowing how to fix the system and keep going is what differentiates the gambler from the successful investor.

If you want to get started in real estate please evaluate:

[...] and pay close attention to his rules for evaluating "investment gurus". They are a great rule-of-thumb. I can't offer a similar source for equities because I haven't invested the time to build my equity portfolio since learning that I had no idea what I was doing with my money in the markets. BTW, being honest with yourself about what you do and don't know is the best place to start building your own business plan for financial freedom.

Good Luck!
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69 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Get rich intelligently, not "quickly", January 10, 2001
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
Rich Dad's Guide to Investing is the third installment in Robert Kiyosaki's best-selling series of financial advice books. The first in the series, Rich Dad, Poor Dad was structured around the story of how Kiyosaki grew up in a family with a father who was a highly-paid official in the Hawai'i school system but who, no matter how much money he made, never seemed to be able to get ahead in his financial life. His advice to Kiyosaki was "Go to school, get good grades, get a good, secure job." Then when Kiyosaki was nine, he adopted a second dad, the now infamous "Rich Dad", the father of his best friend Mike. Rich Dad (who's name is never given in the books) came from a background that was very financially poor, but went on to become one of the wealthiest men in Hawai'i, building business after business and retaining his wealth through his own philosophy of money management. Rich Dad, Poor Dad chronicled and expounded on Rich Dad's advice to Kiyosaki, which could be summarized as: "Don't ever work for money. Make the money work for you. Only hold a job to gain skills, not to make a living. There is a surfeit of opportunity in the world- but you have to go to it, because it won't come to you. Create wealth." Kiyosaki took Rich Dad's advice to heart and went on to make several fortunes of his own.
The second Rich Dad book, The Cashflow Quadrant, was a discussion of the four different approaches to making money- as an employee, as a self-employed professional, as a business-owner and as an investor. Poor Dad valued security, and encouraged Kiyosaki to become a high-paid employee, like himself. But Rich Dad argued that the road to wealth and security lead away from the employee/self-employed half of the "Cashflow Quadrant" and into the business-owner/investor side, where a person can control his own future and financial destiny. Whereas Rich Dad, Poor Dad gave an overview of Rich Dad's financial philosophy, The Cashflow Quadrant detailed a crucial part of it- the argument that only through financial literacy and an understanding of the flow of wealth in the world can a person become wealth himself.
Now comes Rich Dad's Guide to Investing. Although the title might lead some readers to believe that it's a guide to the world of IPOs-and-technology-stocks, it's really an even more in depth look at the world of the businessman and long-term investor, a more hands-on continuation of Cashflow Quadrant. In fact, the whole second half of the book is devoted to strategies for developing and profiting from your own business, which Kiyosaki calls "investing from the inside." IPOs are discussed in the last few chapters- but Kiyosaki is talking about how to do your own IPO.
Like it's predecessors in the series, this book suffers from a rambling and folksy pop-finance style that can sometimes detract from the content of the book. But stylistic considerations aside, the series stands head and shoulders above similarly themed books. Rich Dad's Guide to Investing is no get rich quick guide. Rather, it's a practical blueprint for building wealth even in you are starting out with very little free cash. But that's not to say that it's "no money down". In fact, the strategies outlined here require more than just money- they also require sizable amounts of time. But the Kiyosaki makes the tradeoff in time seem worth it, considering that the alternative he presents is a lifetime of financial constraint.
I especially like Kiyosaki's suggestions for planning and executing three separate tracks of investment: investment for security, investment for comfort and investment for wealth. His pyramid approach to business management was also very interesting. Overall, this book isn't as inspiring as Rich Dad, Poor Dad, but it has much more how-to-do-it nitty-gritty type information, which I appreciated a lot. Highly recommended.
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149 of 160 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Gets Prize for Least Amount Said in Most Amount of Words, May 24, 2006
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
It is amazing how many books and hundreds of pages Kiyosaki can fill with the same info over and over. Furthermore, "Rich Dad" was obviously a fictional character... Kiyosaki's books are all filled with long, detailed conversations between Robert and Rich Dad, conversations that supposedly took place many years ago that obviously the author could not possibly have recalled in such detail, so the books read more like a play than financial advice. To be fair though, I suppose this is a pretty good literary device for making the subject matter more interesting, readable and listenable (dramatic, even, when read aloud by the actors who record his audio books.)

Below is EVERYTHING Kiyosaki has to say in ALL of his books (I am guilty of reading and listening to most all of them, but at least I got them for free at the library.) They are all very repetitive. The following will save you many hours of reading and dollars on his books....

1) The rich don't work for money; money works for the rich.

2) An asset is something that makes money for you; therefore, a house is not necessarily an asset. A liability is something that costs you money.

3) You should borrow money to invest in real estate so that you can get rental income, because...

4) Tax laws favor the rich and tax laws favor real estate investors, and real estate is a better investment than stocks and mutual funds, but if you are going to invest in the market then...

5) Learn how to read financial statements.

and

6) The market will tank big-time when the baby-boomers start retiring.

There you go, now you can read something else...
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163 of 176 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'll never doubt Kiyosaki ever again, November 10, 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
I have read some of the negative articles and reviews here about Kiyosaki, but to me this man has mega credibility. HE WARNED US ABOUT MUTUAL FUNDS--AND HE WAS RIGHT!
He told us that real estate is the way to wealth and that is true also. He recommends network marketing as the perfect B-Quadrant business and that has also turned out to be true.
The man recommend small cap stocks and look at how they have performed. The guy knows his stuff, er, that is his Rich Dad knew his stuff and Kiyosaki is passing on that information updated for the times for all of us to benefit.
Thank you Robert for sharing. I for one am glad that I followed you investing advice and am not getting hammered by the current mutual fund scandal as some other people I know are. And I guess now we know who writes most of those negative 1 star reviews, don't we?
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155 of 168 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I Just Can't Find Anything Good Here, November 9, 2000
This review is from: Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! (Paperback)
Before picking up this book, try books by Peter Lynch, and theMotley Fool. .... Read "The Millionaire Next Door". Then check this book out, and see just how helpful it is.
Here's what I liked about these books:
1. Make money work for you. Good idea. Cut up the credit cards and put the money somewhere useful.
2. Your education may not be tied to your wealth. We have seen examples of this through history, and of course we have also seen contrasting examples.
3. Learn money. Everyone can use a CPA or financial planner sometime in their life, but dealing with your personal finances is crucial.
The trouble is, the more I went and learned about money, the more I realized Kiyosaki's advice was not useful and potentially dangerous.
Here's what I didn't like:
1. Real Estate. This is pretty scary stuff, and to become wealthy you don't need to own any of it. Top that off with reccomendations of books by Robert Allen, someone who has caused more damage to people's financial futures (not to mention his own) than you or I could ever do, and I can't say that any of his real estate advice was particularly helpful, in ANY of the books.
2. Incorporating. There is infinitely more to know about corporations than can be contained in a single book, and he makes it seem so easy, not to mention helpful and necessary in any given financial situation. Not true.
And last but not least, ANY OF HIS INVESTING ADVICE. Making this book the worst of the bunch. Let me give you an example. Two of the riskiest and least-succesful investments you can make in the stock markets are:
1. Penny-stocks, particularly on Canadian exchanges, where it is estimated that 1-in-10 investors stand a chance at making money.
2. Volatile IPOs, regardless of what you've heard on CNBC or read in Newsweek or seen on FOX's "The Street".
Surprisingly, Kiyosaki reccomends investing in Canadian penny-stock IPOs. I know he's protected under the First Amendment, but that kind of writing is just plain dangerous.
Frankly, I don't know what to make of Kiyosaki's series of books. He is vague, and fills the book with politician-like rhetoric. ....
Proceed with caution, and know that there is a lot better advice you can get for free or an equal price.
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68 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An approach .... that works!, July 12, 2000
By 
yaatoo "yaatoo" (Bellingham, WA USA) - See all my reviews
This book represents a profound mindshift.
There is nothing new here, and yet it is all new.
Like his other works, this one 'continues the saga' as he makes an accurate and therefore excruciatingly painful case for 1. Realizing the importance of financial education, 2. Understanding how the rich think about money, and 3. Accepting (and implementing) the simple but profound paradigm shift needed to achieve financial freedom.
But here Kiyosaki goes into detail about a concept and stategies which were only mentioned briefly in earlier works---investing like the rich...read 'how the rich manufacture money.'
His first book presented his startling mindshift, almost in parable form without a lot of detail.
His second work expounded on the dynamics of cashflow.
This latest work is an in depth treatment of the ways in which the rich---and by extrapolation you and me, if we employ the same devices---can go about creating money out of thin air. It is truly thought provoking.
Many books (about success and/or money) are written by someone, who themselves apears to be aspiring to make money by writing books. They are often people who really don't seem to know much more than you or me, or whose works are full of untested platitudes or which require skills so specialized that the rest of us are all but left out. All we can do is look on in awe. Few books are really written by one of the masters, revealing his/her secrets. This is one.
Some have criticized Kiyosaki's works for being wordy. They misunderstand him. It is a layering approach---looking at the same diamond from many many different angles, layering one level of depth on the next---because the really profound truths cannot be grasped on the first go 'round in the snappy style of newspaper copy.
The riddle is clear, while brevity confusing. What's clearly articulated is easily brushed over. "Sure, sure" we say, and rush on thinking we understand, when we really don't. The riddle, on the otherhand, causes us to stop and ponder.
So, if you buy no other book this year or next, this should be the one.
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