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Rich Dad's Rich Kid, Smart Kid: Giving Your Child a Financial Head Start Paperback – January 1, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0446677486 ISBN-10: 0446677485 Edition: Reprint

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Product Details

  • Series: Rich Dad's
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Warner Business; Reprint edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446677485
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446677486
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #120,529 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert Kiyosaki has challenged and changed the way tens of millions of people around the world think about money. With perspectives that often contradict conventional wisdom, Robert has earned a reputation for straight talk, irreverence and courage. He is regarded worldwide as a passionate advocate for financial education. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

From AudioFile

The authors are famous for articulating the difference between saving, investing, owning a business, and being someone's employee. In this audio, they offer the rationale and techniques for passing these distinctions on to children. Their bias is toward being independently wealthy, and they do a marvelous job describing how to introduce young people to that way of thinking: It's all about ownership and accountability for the way one earns, borrows, spends, and invests money. Though their ideas are far from revolutionary, they're fresh and inviting in this production. A must hear for anyone wanting their children to have the habits and attitudes necessary for financial freedom. T.W. 2002 Audie Finalist © AudioFile 2002, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad Poor Dad - the international runaway bestseller that has held a top spot on the New York Times bestsellers list for over six years - is an investor, entrepreneur and educator whose perspectives on money and investing fly in the face of conventional wisdom. He has, virtually single-handedly, challenged and changed the way tens of millions, around the world, think about money.In communicating his point of view on why 'old' advice - get a good job, save money, get out of debt, invest for the long term, and diversify - is 'bad' (both obsolete and flawed) advice, Robert has earned a reputation for straight talk, irreverence and courage.Rich Dad Poor Dad ranks as the longest-running bestseller on all four of the lists that report to Publisher's Weekly - The New York Times, Business Week, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today - and was named "USA Today's #1 Money Book" two years in a row. It is the third longest-running 'how-to' best seller of all time.Translated into 51 languages and available in 109 countries, the Rich Dad series has sold over 27 million copies worldwide and has dominated best sellers lists across Asia, Australia, South America, Mexico and Europe. In 2005, Robert was inducted into Amazon.com Hall of Fame as one of that bookseller's Top 25 Authors. There are currently 26 books in the Rich Dad series.In 2006 Robert teamed up with Donald Trump to co-author Why We Want You To Be Rich - Two Men - One Message. It debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestsellers list.Robert writes a bi-weekly column - 'Why the Rich Are Getting Richer' - for Yahoo! Finance and a monthly column titled 'Rich Returns' for Entrepreneur magazine.Prior to writing Rich Dad Poor Dad, Robert created the educational board game CASHFLOW 101 to teach individuals the financial and investment strategies that his rich dad spent years teaching him. It was those same strategies that allowed Robert to retire at age 47.Today there are more that 2,100 CASHFLOW Clubs - game groups independent of the Rich Dad Company - in cities throughout the world.Born and raised in Hawaii, Robert Kiyosaki is a fourth-generation Japanese-American. After graduating from college in New York, Robert joined the Marine Corps and served in Vietnam as an officer and helicopter gunship pilot. Following the war, Robert went to work in sales for Xerox Corporation and, in 1977, started a company that brought the first nylon and Velcro 'surfer wallets' to market. He founded an international education company in 1985 that taught business and investing to tens of thousands of students throughout the world.  In 1994 Robert sold his business and, through his investments, was able to retire at the age of 47. During his short-lived retirement he wrote Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Customer Reviews

The book, though repetitive is informative- if not on his own personal strategy.
Mari
Unlike the other books in the series, this one draws on the positive lessons of both Mr. Kiyosaki's Rich Dad and his Poor Dad rather than just the Rich Dad.
Donald Mitchell
The concepts in this book are outstanding, and I do highly recommend it, especially if you have children.
David G. Stokes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

147 of 150 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
Rich Dad's Rich Kid, Smart Kid may be the most helpful book ever for guiding adults on how to assist children and teenagers in learning about how to organize their lives to be more successful. I highly recommend this book to every parent, god parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, and caring older sibling.
I think this is the best of the Rich Dad, Poor Dad series, and clearly deserves more than five stars.
Think of this book as the instructor's guide to teaching Rich Dad, Poor Dad combined with a basic guide to helping young people identify their strengths and learning styles. The book also provides a sound foundation for helping young people build their self-confidence in a healthy way.
Unlike the other books in the series, this one draws on the positive lessons of both Mr. Kiyosaki's Rich Dad and his Poor Dad rather than just the Rich Dad. To overcome Mr. Kiyosaki's lack of experience as a parent (he has no children), the book relies on important academic and professional research to add context for Mr. Kiyosaki's observations about his own childhood.
The book begins by citing a recent HEW study that showed that 56 out of 100 people who are 65 need either government or family financial assistance to make ends meet. The book is aimed at providing children with the learning experiences to allow them to avoid that dismal financial result.
Then the perspective shifts to pointing out that the change from an industrial to an information economy has shifted the rules of success in our society. The old rules were to get a good education, get a good job, and have financial security from one employer.
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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 6, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't normally buy follow-up books because I find them to be quite repetitive, however, this one is a true exception.
"Rich Dad" made such an impact with me that I have shared it with many others over the past two years. That said, my wife and I have struggled with how to take what we've learned and pass it on to our children.
This book is it! As we all struggle to ensure our children get the best education possible, we're facing an ironic trend in the school systems where teachers are teaching our children how to pass standardized tests instead of focusing on what children need to thrive in this new century (this is not a knock on that practice - if that's what it takes today, that's what it takes, but our children need more and it's our responsiblity as parents to provide the rest - we cannot rely on our school systems to be the sole educators of our children (sorry for the sermon)). This book was designed to fill in the gaps, to give your kids what they're missing from school - inspiring and practical financial knowledge.
It's not about turning little Johnny into a power stock-broker, but rather awakening his love of learning so that doors will open for him - it's a way of empowering our children by giving them the skills they'll need to succeed in every aspect of their lives.
I can't recommend a book more than I do this one!
The best to you and yours!
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62 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Theresa Gasper on February 15, 2001
Format: Paperback
After reading Rich Dad/Poor Dad, Cash Flow Quadrant and Rich Dad's Guide to Investing, I found this one to be repetitive, full of too many cutesy stories and not enough meat. The appendix is the best part of the book and I had hoped the entire book would be more like the info offered in the appendix. If you haven't read the other books, this offers a good starting point.
Overall I like Kiyosaki's style of writing and he makes a boring subject come alive with his storytelling style, but sometimes he just overdoes it.
Finally, I recently purchased his CashFlow 101 game and my two teenagers (son 16, daughter 14) love the game and beg us to play it all the time. They caught on fast to the score card which includes a balance sheet & income statement. I'm learning a lot just teaching and guiding them. It's worth the investment just to hear your 14 year old say "I don't want any more doodads, I'm trying to build my passive income here!".
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Justin Belkin on January 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
Our current education system fails to adequately teach our children the financial skills necessary to survive later on in life. Robert Kiyosaki wrote Rich Kid, Smart Kid to fill those gaps. The fundamental premise of the book is that all children are born smart and rich. The goal of education is to bring out that natural genius within our children. Awakening this genius inside of us is a sure way to become happy. Therefore, being happy through realizing our innate potential is more fulfilling than being rich and unhappy. Rich Dad said, "If you are not happy while getting rich, chances are you will not be happy when you get rich. So whether you are rich or poor, make sure you are happy" (14).
The root of the current problem lies in America's transitioning from an Industrial society into an Information society. Kiyosaki explains the need for transitioning our thought, "In the Information Age, what you know becomes obsolete very quickly. What you learned is important, but not as important as how fast you can learn, change, and adapt to new information" (xi). These structural changes tangibly affect us regardless of whether or not we acknowledge them. Some of the problems facing tomorrow's youth include social security, healthcare, increased risk of obsolesce through increased specialization, and the need for lifelong education. Education must adjust with the times.
Currently, our education system teaches scholastic and professional skills. Scholastic education focuses on the ability to read, write, and do arithmetic. Professional education trains students for high-level careers later on in life. However, this Western brand of education fails our children in some crucial ways. Rich Dad said, "The child learns by doing, making mistakes, and then learning" (238).
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