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Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier Paperback – April 17, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing; Limited 1st ed edition (April 17, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0878333126
  • ISBN-13: 978-0878333127
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.3 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,016,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Mr. Harvey Frommer, a friend of the NLBPA, has published another great book . . .

A vivid account of the two as genuine American heroes. (Washington Post)

One of the best . . . brutally honest with no punches pulled. (Amsterdam News)

A fine and sympathetic biography. (Library Journal)

Interesting and exciting book. (Jersey Journal)

Thorough research, a vivid account. (Chicago Tribune)

A celebration, a nostalgic account. (EBONY)

Pleasant, upbeat look at this unusual pair. (Kirkus Reviews)

I've read more than a dozen books on the Rickey/Robinson tandem and I must say that Frommer's is the best structured. He brings Robinson's persona alive, proving why he was the first black man selected to break the racial barrier. (Art Rust Jr. Black Issues Book Review)

Just a terrific book. It fills in so many of the blanks about the story of Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey. It's like a history lesson. And the intro by Monte Irvin puts it over the top. . . . highly recommended. (Billy Sample, host, Major League Baseball Radio)

An unusual and deeply moving book. (Publishers Weekly)

Frommer's analysis of Rickey's motives sets this book apart . . . [Rickey and Robinson] raises all the right questions in interesting ways. (Booklist)

About the Author

Harvey Frommer has written 29 books and over 600 artivcles, mostly on sports subjects. The author of the classic New York City Baseball: 1947-1957 and the bestselling Throwing Heat, Nolan Ryan's autobiography, he is professor of English in the City University of New York. Frommer lives with his family in North Woodmere, Long Island.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
From Black Athlete Sports Netwrok
This N' That with Tony Mack:
Book Review: Rickey and Robinson
-"It is not the critic who counts, nor the man who points out where the strong man stumbles, nor where the doer of deeds could have done better. On the contrary, the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena -- whose vision is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives vallantly; who errs and comes up again and again; who knows the greatest devotions; the great enthusiasms; who at best knows in the end of the triumph of high achievement."
-- Theodore Roosevelt
Harvey Frommer lived in Brooklyn that summer in 1947 when two men, one black and one white, came together to right a long overdue wrong in the sport of baseball. Just two years removed from the end of World War II, the climate in America and the world had taken on a major change.
More than 50 years later, Frommer gives us a brief snapshot of the life and times of Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey. Blending exclusive interviews with Rachel Robinson, Mack Robinson (Jackie's brother), Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Ralph Kiner, and others, Frommer evokes the lives of Brooklyn Dodgers manager Branch Rickey and heralded baseball player Jackie Robinson to describe how they worked to shatter baseball's color line.
"Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier" gives a vivid account on the lives of these two men and how their collaboration helped bring change to the game of baseball and to society. "Many Blacks had just returned home from the war, including Jackie", said Frommer. "They had just served their country in a war and were tired of being considered second-class citizens.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
From Black Athlete Sports Netwrok
This N' That with Tony Mack:
Book Review: Rickey and Robinson
-"It is not the critic who counts, nor the man who points out where the strong man stumbles, nor where the doer of deeds could have done better. On the contrary, the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena -- whose vision is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives vallantly; who errs and comes up again and again; who knows the greatest devotions; the great enthusiasms; who at best knows in the end of the triumph of high achievement."
-- Theodore Roosevelt
Harvey Frommer lived in Brooklyn that summer in 1947 when two men, one black and one white, came together to right a long overdue wrong in the sport of baseball. Just two years removed from the end of World War II, the climate in America and the world had taken on a major change.
More than 50 years later, Frommer gives us a brief snapshot of the life and times of Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey. Blending exclusive interviews with Rachel Robinson, Mack Robinson (Jackie's brother), Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Ralph Kiner, and others, Frommer evokes the lives of Brooklyn Dodgers manager Branch Rickey and heralded baseball player Jackie Robinson to describe how they worked to shatter baseball's color line.
"Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier" gives a vivid account on the lives of these two men and how their collaboration helped bring change to the game of baseball and to society. "Many Blacks had just returned home from the war, including Jackie", said Frommer. "They had just served their country in a war and were tired of being considered second-class citizens.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
******************************************************** ...
Professional athletes are probably no more ignorant of history than the rest of us, but there was something especially disturbing about the number of modern players who, in 1997, during the fiftieth anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the baseball color line, revealed that they didn't know who he was. Pollsters probably didn't ask, but it's likely even fewer would have known who Branch Rickey was. That black players in particular, whose careers follow the path that these men blazed, do not comprehend and honor the debt is most troubling of all. Anyone wishing to remedy their own lack of knowledge, and even those who think they already know the whole story, will find Harvey Frommer's Rickey and Robinson an invaluable resource and a truly moving read.
Mr. Frommer had the novel idea of structuring the book as parallel biographies of the two men, their stories overlapping and lives knitting together for that remarkable period of years when they, almost by themselves, integrated major league baseball. Jackie Robinson's is the better known tale, from UCLA to the Army to the Negro Leagues to the Dodgers' minor leagues and then to Brooklyn, with a significant career in business and politics afterwards. And most baseball fans will be familiar with Branch Rickey's reputation as an innovator, his most lasting contributions, besides integration, to the game including the batting helmet and the organized minor league farm system. Met fans too will recall Ralph Kiner's stories about how tight-fisted and patronizing (in both the positive and negative senses) Rickey was with his players. But Mr.
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