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Comment: Shared Knowledge is a not for profit public charity! Check us out on facebook. We provide funding for educational programs in Richmond, Virginia. PLEASE READ FULL DESCRIPTION -USED GOOD- This book has been read and may show wear to the cover and or pages. There may be some dog-eared pages. In some cases the internal pages may contain highlighting/margin notes/underlining or any combination of these markings. The binding will be secure in all cases. This is a good reading and studying copy and has been verified that all pages are legible and intact. If the book contained a CD it is not guaranteed to still be included. Your purchase directly supports our scholarship program as well as our partner charities. All items are packed and shipped from the Amazon warehouse. Thanks so much for your purchase!
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Riders on the Storm: My Life with Jim Morrison and the Doors Paperback – September 1, 1991


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Riders on the Storm: My Life with Jim Morrison and the Doors + Light My Fire + The Doors: Unhinged
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Delta; Reissue edition (September 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385304471
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385304474
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (128 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #48,062 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Doors drummer Densmore, who had a love-hate relationship with lead singer Morrison, sympathetically chronicles the self-destructive Lizard King's rise and fall. "Densmore's detailed account . . . is often narrated in a glib style" but remains "indispensable for fans of one of rock music's most flamboyant and controversial groups," said PW . Photos.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Such is the mystique, the iconoclastic reverence, the enduring commercial success and marketability of Jim Morrison, enigmatic lead singer of the Doors, 19 years after his death, that Densmore, founding Doors member and drummer, is repeatedly upstaged in his own autobiography. Densmore's inside-out account of the group's history perceptively examines relationships, dynamics, creative evolution, difficulties, and artistry, but Morrison in his many guises--angst-ridden poet, Lizard King, pop icon, and alcoholic--invariably dominates every chapter, story, and anecdote. In fact, Densmore addresses significant chunks of italicized text directly to Morrison in a therapeutic attempt to reconcile his own ambiguous feelings, often becoming overly confessional. This book should be very popular, especially as filmmaker Oliver Stone's anticipated Doors movie will undoubtedly create a new wave of Jim Morrison/Doors mania. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 5/1/90.
- Barry Miller, Austin P.L., Tex.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

He just tells it like it was.
Elonna Marie
John Densmore's book was very different from the other books I've read on the Doors, and the life of Jim Morrison.
borrowed_trauma
It is very well written by one of the band's own members.
J.V.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Elonna Marie on May 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book immensely. Densmore has a personable, clear, consise style of writing and expresses himself very well. I felt I was there as he described events that happened 30 years ago. I laughed out loud at certain anecdotes in the book, especially when he describes avoiding the draft. For being the "uptight" one in the Doors, Densmore does have a sense of humour that comes through in his writing. He neither trashes Jim, nor does he gloss over Jim. He just tells it like it was. I never sensed any jealousy, just frustration, intimidation, fear, anger, but also admiration and brotherly love. Complex feelings. Clearly that's what Densmore is trying to get through, he wants to explain himself and isn't trying to hide or gloss over. There are many great anecdotes in this book, some funny, some sad, some plain scary! I could understand why Densmore felt the way he did at any given time, he explains it so well. The Doors were 4 very different personalities, obviously. I don't see any of them as being "the bad guy", but they obviously bumped heads due to personality clashes. That's life! Densmore was a teenager when he joined the Doors, so he pretty much grew up with them as well. That's another thing I found so interesting, Densmore sharing his growing-up with the reader, the things he learned along the way. He often addresses Jim directly in the book, telling Jim he learned integrity from him. I couldn't put this book down, very addictive reading.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By "jackvasile" on July 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
John Densmore's account of his life with Jim Morrison is a sensitive, searching memoir that invites readers to share its intimate point of view. Densmore details the genesis, breakthough, and dissolution of The Doors with an honesty made palpable by his obvious need for truthful answers. Anchoring the narrative are excerpts from a long letter Densmore wrote to Morrison after his death, and it is through this letter that the drummer enables us to understand how haunted he is by his time working and touring with Morrison, a gifted and difficult artist capable of both clear-eyed transcendence and frustrating childishness, of lucid grace and drunken mumblings. Densmore's reconciliation allows us access not only to his life with Morrison, but to our own lives with people who might similarly inspire and baffle us. RIDERS ON THE STORM makes for a wonderfully moving read, and Densmore's deft placement of Morrison's lyrics and poetry throughout illuminates what a fine and pioneering rock lyricist he was.
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48 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Berger VINE VOICE on May 12, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I feel sorry for John Densmore. Despite having been a rock star, the member of what was one of the world's top half dozen rock groups, with all the groupies and money and glamor that that entailed, he remains at this book's writing phenomenally insecure - a nebbish who never found himself despite immersing himself in the California human potential culture purported to deliver exactly that.

He's insecure about girls, insecure about who's his friend, insecure about his drab middle-class roots, insecure about his life prospects and failure to have accomplished much of anything until he became part of the Doors. Some of the introspection in here is so bare and revealing it's almost embarrassing to read. The picture of this naïve Everyman locked into a creative foursome with Jim Morrison, the quintessential dangerous and destructive rock star, is priceless.

America was transiting from harmless British Invasion into superficially benign Flower Power, but Morrison meanwhile was wearing black, singing about sex and death, leading concerts that were like dark seances with somber endings, and challenging bandmates and audiences alike to confront their darker selves and deeper fears. He scared the hell out of the likes of John Densmore.

Morrison, as we know from organist Ray Manzarek's book "Light My Fire", once demanded that Densmore be kicked out of the group; he was just too neurotic and got on Morrison's nerves. Densmore found Morrison, particularly as his alcoholism and erratic behavior grew, so disturbing that Densmore had chronic skin rashes from the stress.

Densmore represents a certain sad byway of that era - people whose pursuit of peace and love, meditation and marijuana, sought to cover or compensate for intense feelings of inadequacy.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have read most of the books on Morrison and the Doors and I feel this one is the most insightful,interesting and believable. Although John Densmore's short bio on himself isn't very interesting, it focuses mainly on Morisson's demise and how it affected the band and takes you through the Door's amazing journey through fame and tragedy. This book also has several cool photograghs. Densmore's writing feels deep and honest throughout. I read Ray Manzarek's(keyboard) book and it came off to me as highly glamourized. Ray is known for glamourizing his accounts and even contradicts himself in interviewes.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ledazan on December 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
This was a good read but not particularly juicy or revealing. Densmore dwells often on his guilt at not being able to stop Morrison's downward spiral. I wasn't sure from reading the book whether Desmore and Morrison were just bandmates or also friends. At times they seemed somewhat close but at others, they seemed to have little more than a working relationship in a band.
The author seems like a gentle, introspective soul. At times it seemed like he was a bit out of the loop as to what his bandmates were up to.
I enjoyed the glimpses into his life with Jim--e.g. Jim pulling Ray's hair in the car or Jim swallowing a quarter--and Densmore's own life--his relationships and music.
I do wonder about the tension between Densmore and Manzarek, as this wasn't really mentioned. I guess I'll be reading "Light My Fire" next for Ray's perspective.
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