Winter Driving Best Books of the Month Valentine's Day Shop Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon King easycohice_2016 All-New Amazon Fire TV Beauty V-Day Valentine's Day Cards Amazon Gift Card Offer chiraq chiraq chiraq  Amazon Echo All-New Fire Kindle Paperwhite Prime Exclusive Savings in Video Games Shop Now SnS

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars6
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on April 19, 2003
Charlie Hunter's a hard guy to pin down. Sometimes going for the minimalist funk route (his duo outing with Leon Parker), the world music approach (his Bob Marley cover album), and the funk-vocal move (his last), he hasn't always been 100% successful. What he's lost in precision and focus, he's gained in breadth of presentation, and when it all comes together optimally, as it does on Right Now Move, the results are nothing short of spectacular.
This is by far Charlie Hunter's finest album to date. It combines a glorious loose-limbed ease with some (for Hunter) toughness that has sometimes been lacking in the past. The addition of Curtis Fowlkes on trombone and Gregorire Maret on chromatic harmonic add a needed blooziness and grit to the basic jazz/funk proceedings.
There's also a wonderful world-music sensibility to several of the cuts--Latin on "Changui," South African on the classic Hugh Masekela vehicle, "Wade in the Water," and West African on "Mali." These cuts don't necessarily reproduce typical musical moves associated with their world regions as much as they slyly evoke their sensibilities. This is especially true of "Mali," which sounds authentically West African with little actual playing in a Malian mode.
Special mention should be made of John Ellis. He's grown tremendously as a player, especially on bass clarinet. Check out his work on "Le Bateau Irve," where his timbre and fluid playing set the tone for one of the more memorable tunes on the album. But it's all good; no slackers, not let-ups. A continuation of some very fine jazz releases in the first part of 2003.
0Comment21 of 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon August 7, 2003
Wow! Charlie Hunter just gets better with each release he puts out. His unique playing (playing an instrument that is half guitar and half bass can be characterized as nothing more than unique) is kicked up another notch here. It sounds like Hunter has gained confidence since his "Songs from the Analog Playground" release last year. The songs are upbeat, and his playing has a little more edge to it, a little more pizzazz. Hunter has always been a great guitarist, but if he keeps going the direction he's headed in, he'll be a giant.
Hunter's style of music is to mix bass and guitar at the same time. This is easily heard in the opening of "Try". There are some incredible finger gymnastics going on to play eight strings like he does. But the song doesn't focus on Hunter for very long. In jump the horns and this song is off and running. You can tell just from the sound of the music, that these boys were having fun cutting this tune. It's all through the album. Hunter's solo on "Whoop-Ass" is exactly that, showing what an accomplished musician he is. John Ellis' own solo is out there as well. "Changui" is a Latin-sounding song with another great solo from Ellis. Listen to Hunter's guitar under that solo, it sounds almost like steel-drums. Curtis Fowlkes gets a few minutes to shine as well. His trombone solo in "Freak Fest" is great. Not often you hear a trombone take the spotlight, but Fowlkes does a great job. Fowlkes puts a mute in the bell, and belts out another solo in "Wade In the Water", right after an incredible solo shot by Hunter. Check out his bluesy outro on that song. Derrek Phillips on drums puts an amazing performance on throughout the whole album. He is rock solid and scary. Gregoire Maret steps in with harmonica on most of the tracks. He has a sound reminiscent of Toots Thelonious.
Hunter and the boys turn out a great performance on "Right Now Move". I think Hunter is starting to reach out and experiment more with his sound. I've always been impressed with his stuff, but I don't think never as nearly impressed I am with this release. He's been playing with his band for the last few years. Whatever he was looking for, I think he found a winner with this Quintet. This is a solid album from everyone in the band. It is truly a group effort and a must have for Hunter and jazz fans alike.
0Comment5 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on February 2, 2011
Give him credit for trying different sounds on most of his albums. It's a bit of a copy of Medeski Martin and Wood or John Scofield, but it's still pretty good. There's a lot of harmonica, so be forewarned. It's not your usual blues style, however. It's more Toots Thielmann.
0Comment1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon August 7, 2003
Wow! Charlie Hunter just gets better with each release he puts out. His unique playing (playing an instrument that is half guitar and half bass can be characterized as nothing more than unique) is kicked up another notch here. It sounds like Hunter has gained confidence since his "Songs from the Analog Playground" release last year. The songs are upbeat, and his playing has a little more edge to it, a little more pizzazz. Hunter has always been a great guitarist, but if he keeps going the direction he's headed in, he'll be a giant.
Hunter's style of music is to mix bass and guitar at the same time. This is easily heard in the opening of "Try". There are some incredible finger gymnastics going on to play eight strings like he does. But the song doesn't focus on Hunter for very long. In jump the horns and this song is off and running. You can tell just from the sound of the music, that these boys were having fun cutting this tune. It's all through the album. Hunter's solo on "Whoop-Ass" is exactly that, showing what an accomplished musician he is. John Ellis' own solo is out there as well. "Changui" is a Latin-sounding song with another great solo from Ellis. Listen to Hunter's guitar under that solo, it sounds almost like steel-drums. Curtis Fowlkes gets a few minutes to shine as well. His trombone solo in "Freak Fest" is great. Not often you hear a trombone take the spotlight, but Fowlkes does a great job. Fowlkes puts a mute in the bell, and belts out another solo in "Wade In the Water", right after an incredible solo shot by Hunter. Check out his bluesy outro on that song. Derrek Phillips on drums puts an amazing performance on throughout the whole album. He is rock solid and scary. Gregoire Maret steps in with harmonica on most of the tracks. He has a sound reminiscent of Toots Thelonious.
Hunter and the boys turn out a great performance on "Right Now Move". I think Hunter is starting to reach out and experiment more with his sound. I've always been impressed with his stuff, but I don't think never as nearly impressed I am with this release. He's been playing with his band for the last few years. Whatever he was looking for, I think he found a winner with this Quintet. This is a solid album from everyone in the band. It is truly a group effort and a must have for Hunter and jazz fans alike.
11 comment4 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon September 12, 2015
"Talking Only Makes It Worse" is the new album by one of the most intelligent, inventive, eclectic, rockin', soulful, jazzy, funky and psychedelic guitar groups of all-time. While the San Francisco group disbanded in 1997, this long-awaited recording proves that T.J. Kirk was not only a studio powerhouse, but a great live band. In a live environment, we realize for the first time that T.J. Kirk's unique sound is not a result of studio post-production, but musical craftsmanship in real time. Almost entirely comprised of songs from the previous two albums, the listener is granted immediate gratification. The live tunes demonstrate a level of improvisation that may have moved them into the jamband category, had it existed as a mature genre in the mid-1990's. Expect the unexpected. 'Epistrophy' for example shows creative arrangements that feature Ozzy Osbourne and Led Zeppelin nods. In addition to some vocal call and response, 'The Pay Back' features verbal scatting. Complete with fresh solos, different arrangements, stage banter and a few tricks up the sleeve, this disc is as close as most of us will ever get to experiencing a live version of one of Charlie Hunter's greatest musical incarnations.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on November 29, 2004
I've had this album for quite a while now, and I thought that with repeated listens it would grow on me, that the grating fingers-on-blackboard effect the sound of that chromatic harmonica produces would gradually fade. But no, it still wrecks the album for me. I do like "Oakland", and I think the rest of the album would be good if I could ask my CD player to filter out the harmonica.

To me Hunter peaked with Charlie Hunter, Duo, and Analog Playground -- the Blue Notes.

Friends Seen and Unseen was a step back in the right direction. Right Now Move was unfortunate...
22 comments2 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items


Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.