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Right on


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Right On
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Audio CD, May 11, 1992
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Audio, Cassette, May 12, 1992
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 11, 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Motown
  • ASIN: B000008LAJ
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,524,877 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By VINCENT P TARSITANO on November 16, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Berry Gordy picked a big winner when he hired Jean Terrell to replace Diana Ross in The Supremes. Vocally, she was stunning, stylish, strong and completely compatible with her colleagues in the group: a kind of cross between Diana Ross and Dionne Warwick, with a little Natalie Cole sprinkled in [in spite of the fact that Ms. Cole had yet to make her debut on record]. The Terrell-Wilson-Birdsong blend was sheer musical perfection. There was an instantly noticeable renewed vigor to the vocals, as well as a focus on group singing and harmony. Ms. Terrell frequently added her voice to the background harmonies, as well.

As the first Supremes album recorded and released after Ms. Ross's departure, this collection is an historical statement. The fact that the music, songs, production and performances are very, very good also makes it a treat.

In fact, 8 of the 12 selections are quite strong, and, in many cases, excellent soul-infused pop.

Of course, "Up The Ladder to The Roof," the "new" group's first single release, is featured. It went top ten pop, and actually bested Ms. Ross's debut single. It is a rollicking romp, upbeat, with angelic vocals, gloriously led by Ms. Terrell, and featuring fill-in phrases by Mary Wilson and Cindy Birdsong. Quite a statement lyrically and performance-wise.

The second single, the quasi-anthemic "Everybody's Got The Right to Love," reached the upper half of the top forty, but due to it's rather unusual rhythm, was not a smash. It was a very good record, and the group performed it in all of their live shows, as well as on TV, in 70 and 71.

"The Loving Country," co-written by Smokey Robinson, is quite a symphonic soul masterpiece, featuring breathtaking harmonies, and an incredibly strong lead by Ms. Terrell.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By L. garrett on January 30, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Jean,Mary, and Cindy nailed this album. With Frank Wilson at the production helm, the new group sans Ross found a new style and sound that was "right on" target.
The set contains maybe a couple of songs you would consider filler material but the songs as a whole are great.That unmistakeable motown sound is still there with bass and tambourines working their magic.
The songs range from smooth ballads to contemporary to pop/soul. The song that gets the most oldies airplay is "Up the ladder" yet i wonder why i never heard much of the others. Many of them were potential smash hit material.
Legend has it the album was not promoted as heavily as it should have been by motown (as all eyes were on Ms. Ross).This was a fate subsequent Supremes albums would also meet.
Record company indiference still seems to haunt the group. Even With their legions of fans i am flabbergasted at the fact that Motown has not re-release all of the Supremes albums from the seventies. If you can find an original compact disc copy of "Right On"..... at an affordable price...GET IT !!
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Format: Audio CD
I agree with reviewer "Vincent" on so many points. Right On was a great album to usher in the "new" Supremes and the new decade. But I think "(I Got Hurt) Trying to Be The Only Girl in Your Life" is one of the BEST songs on the album; a lost Motown mid-tempo gem that tells a great little story and has Top-40 Hit written all over it. This song would've sounded great on radio!
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