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Rimsky-Korsakov: Le Coq D'Or Import


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Audio CD, Import, June 29, 2004
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$79.98 $63.00

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Product Details

  • Conductor: Julius Rudel
  • Audio CD (June 29, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Gala
  • ASIN: B0002ABU9I
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #521,536 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Prologue. Preface of the astrologer
2. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 1. Monologue of Dodon
3. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 1. The plan of Gvidon
4. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 1. The plan of Afron
5. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 1. Entrance of the astrologer
6. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 1. Scene with the parrot
7. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 1. Sleep of Dodon
8. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 1. Dream of Dodon
9. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 1. Appeals of the Golden Cockere
10. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 2. Chorus of the soldiers
See all 12 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 2. Dance of the Queen Shemakha
2. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 2. Chorus of the slaves
3. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 3. Ballet
4. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 3. Chorus of the people of Dodon
5. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 3. Entrance of Dodon
6. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Act 3. Death of Dodon
7. Le Coq d'Or (The Golden Cockerel; Zolotoy petushok), opera in 3 acts with a prologue & epilogue: Epilogue. Moral of the astrologer
8. Mozart and Salieri (Motsart i Sal'yeri), opera in 1 act, Op. 48: Scene 1. Introduction and Salieri's monologue. There is no justice o
9. Mozart and Salieri (Motsart i Sal'yeri), opera in 1 act, Op. 48: Scene 1. Entrance of Mozart and dialogue Mozart and Salieri. A ha! Y
10. Mozart and Salieri (Motsart i Sal'yeri), opera in 1 act, Op. 48: Scene 1. Evocation of the Petits Riens
See all 18 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By John Clement on March 9, 2005
I saw the production in question the year it opened at the NYC opera, and the recording is a faithful reproduction of Sills' and Tregle's marvellous performances. Even her laughter immediately tells you how she thinks the king is stupid, while making the king think she is girlish. The performance earns the highest rating.

When hearing Tregle's performance as King Dodon one can understand why it was banned. He makes the king appear ineffective, overbearing, and not very bright. The brilliant libretto which parodies Czar Nicholas II is very effective in Tregle's voice.

However, the quality of transfer is not very good. The original was the audio simulcast which was probably recorded on a home stereo tape recorder. Then it was subsequently made into a vinyl recording. The vinyl ticks an pops were still evident in the result. The last track on the first CD had some very large pops and a number of crackles. In addition there were some obvious tape dropouts. The ticks and pops are all removable by good quality software. Most of the dropouts are also easily spliced out as they are of very short duration, and the change is not audible. However there are several places where the volume suddenly jumps, possibly because of a skip in the recording process. This typically happens when using a computer for the recording, but it could be due to bad editing before the record was made. There is also the possibility that this is where the record breaks were located and GALA did not properly match the volume changes across the break. Finally there is a fairly large phase shift between the left and right channels which moves the orchestra to one side of the sound stage, despite having equal volume on both channels.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Rudy Avila on September 21, 2004
This is a must have for collectors of rare opera and for fans of the American soprano Beverly Sills. The Russian composer Rimsky Korsakov is best known for his "Flight Of The Bumble Bee"- which in itself is part of one of his operas about a tsar turning into a bee. Korsakov had a knack for the exotic (he composed music for the Arabian Nights story of Scheherezade) and his music, which is essentially Russian- Western in a Romantic sense, is perfect for the world of fantasy. This opera "Le Coq D'Or" French for "The Golden Cockerel" may have been written in French by Korsakov (who spoke various languages)and most undoubtedly it was also in his native Russian. The plot is taken from a Russian fairy tale about a strange, Oriental kingdom and the search for the enigmatic golden bird "The Golden Cockerel" that has the gift of prophecy. Korsakov was not the only Russian to write an opera based on a fairy tale. Sergei Prokofiev based his opera "The Love Of Three Oranges" on another Russian legend.

This recording (I don't quite recall since it's been a while that I've heard it) is in English, translated directly from the French libretto. The dynamic duo that was Beverly Sills and bass Norman Treigle feauture their brilliant operatic and acting talents to this recording. Norman Treigle had a keen sense of theatre and he shared much success with Beverly Sills at the New York City Opera. His bass voice was earthy, sonorous and quite lovely note-for-note, allowing us to hear every line of the text. Back then, there were no supertitles superimposed on a screen. It was more important for singers to really enunciate and speak clearly, even act as if in a play, to get the message of the opera across. Beverly Sills sings the role of Queen Shemakah, a fiendishly difficult coloratura part.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. G. Koonce on January 28, 2006
A previous reviewer is right about the "Mozart and Salieri" bonus being the best part of this set. The 1951 Soviet recording is amazingly superior in sound quality to the 1971 NYCO Cockerel. I'd love to hear Reizen's Dodon and Kozlovsky's Astrologer. Before a famous Italian tenor (Corelli?) visited Russia, Russian tenors had their own distinct style, a little reedier and lighter, in comparison to most Italian and other western tenors. Kozlovsky was among the best of the Russian tenor school, if not the best. (Fortunately, the old style is coming back into vogue among the new generation of Russian tenors.) I only broke down and bought the NYCO recording, because the Kirov has yet to record "The Golden Cockerel" in its series of Russian operas for Philips. The NYCO recording sounds like a tape or a vinyl record in sound quality, and the violins sound tinny in parts, but the playing itself under Julius Rudel is fine. The English-language production fills a gap but makes me wish more for a recording by a Russian cast.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By DAVID BRYSON VINE VOICE on December 20, 2008
This 1971 live performance of Rimsky's Coq d'Or has received some fairly strong adverse comment on grounds of the recorded sound-quality. To some extent I have to go along with this criticism. The sound, particularly of the orchestra, is lacking in the charm and magic that any Rimsky score should radiate. `Dry' is not quite the right word, but the effect is oddly colourless, and that in a score remarkable for orchestral coloration even by the standards of one of the finest of all orchestral technicians has to be counted a serious drawback.

You could talk me out of my 4-star rating without much difficulty, but I'll stick with it for the time being because for one thing the unfavourable impression that the recorded sound creates is worst at the first hearing and not quite so bad subsequently; for another thing this performance has some particularly fine points in its favour; and for yet another there is the aptly entitled `bonus' of the rarely heard Mozart and Salieri. Julius Rudel's understanding of the main score seems just fine to me, and I expect that the orchestral players sounded much more winning in real life than the recording technicians allow them to sound for us now. One criticism that could not stand up would be in respect of clarity - the singers' enunciation is exemplary, and by a second hearing you will probably find that you can hear the English performing text in all the full and complete glory of its rhyming doggerel. Comprehension of the text is particularly important, and important for Mozart and Salieri as well as for the Coq d'Or. These are not nonsense-plots such as you might encounter in some 18th century operas.
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