Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ring of Intrigue (Dance of the Rings, Book 2) Mass Market Paperback – December 1, 1996


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.31 $0.01

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Dance of the Rings (Book 2)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 752 pages
  • Publisher: DAW; First Printing edition (February 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0886777194
  • ISBN-13: 978-0886777197
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.6 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,920,160 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The next installment in the "entertaining" series that will "appeal to fans of Marion Zimmer Bradley's Darkover series." --Science Fiction Chronicle

"Dangerous intrigues arise from within and without, along with enough action spicing the mix and enough secrets yet to be revealed, that the next book in the series can't come soon enough." --Adventures of Sword and Sorcery

"Jane S. Fancher, in her first fantasy novel, has created a powerful dynasty...The reader is totally captured in the web of the tale...Dance of the Rings promises to be an enduring addition to the fantasy field." --Affaire de Coeur

"A powerful dynastic fantasy--brilliantly conceived with strong characters and a unique magic--what more could you ask!" --C.J. Cherryh

From the Author

Ganfrion, Ganfrion, Ganfrion.
    Note to self: One should never get on a panel with another author who believes in absolutes and defends those absolutes...vociferously. The term "never" is a sure-fire goad to try to prove them wrong. For once, I let my keyboard speak rather than my mouth.
    I think Ganfrion proves my point quite admirably. Unfortunately, there's no way I can explain without a major spoiler. Suffice to say, in the never ending game of nothing quite as it seems, Ganfrion definitely wins some kind of no-prize.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
71%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
29%
1 star
0%
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By S Smyth on April 11, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A month after the destruction at Boreton Turnout, the Rhomandi brothers Deymorin, Mikhyel, and Nikaenour along with Deymorin's companion, Kiyrstin, return to Rhomatum only to be immediately arrested on entering the city. It is feared that they might be impostors wanting to make mischief now that the Ley-web has become damaged, or that the real brothers have returned with the machine that can harness lightning and so cause even more damage. A night passes, and Nikaenour, upon his release, demands that his wife, Lidye, have the others set free, too. Mostly, the arrests have been a nuisance, but Mikhyel has fallen victim to the prisoner Ganfrion, who forces him to perform sexual acts and which Ganfrion uses to blackmail Mikhyel into promising future favours.
The brothers discover that Anheliaa, the ringmaster, is slowly dying. And the city council are demanding an explanation regarding the state of the Ley-web, and what is intended to be done about it. Mikhyel and Kiyrstin set the council's immediate fears to rest. But it falls to Mikhyel and Deymorin to attend to the outer nodes' confidence in the Rhomandi, and rally the troops in case of attack from their old adversary the Mauritumin, and their Northern Crescent allies.
Like its predecessor, Ring of lightning, this book concerns itself ( even more so now that the number of direct associations have increased), with how the principal characters see themselves in relation to one another and the outside world; human, and non-human; politically, familially, and magically. This makes for an interesting mix of romance, and vested interests, which I found to be gritty, subtle in its development of plot line, and at times, appropriately humorous. So anyone who likes their fantasy more involving than usual, should find this book, along with its stablemates, good reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By frumiousb VINE VOICE on April 23, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When I read and reviewed Ring of Lightning (the first book in the Dance of the Rings) I wrote that it was flawed, but had a great deal of promise. I liked the interactions with the brothers and thought that there was a good set-up to an intriguing new fantasy world. I had a lot of hope that Fancher would outgrow the flaws in the first book and turn in a spectacular second series entry.

Unfortunately, Ring of Intrigue does not even live up to the flawed standard of Ring of Lightning. The interaction between the brothers, which was a lot of what was good about Ring of Lightning, turned into melodramatic mush in Ring of Intrigue. If a character said, "Dammit, Khyel!" (or its equivalent) one more time I was going to hurl the book out the window. Although the plot was interesting and again promising, it was so long and drawn-out that I forgot quite a few bits by the time that I got towards the end of the book. There is also something about the pacing that was not quite right. There are huge parts of the prose spent on small moments while major plot elements can be missed if you blink.

Unfortunately, I would not recommend this book. I would particularly not recommend it if you were as lukewarm about Ring of Lightning as I was. If you found the first book perfect, then this may well be more your cup of tea than it was mine. If I find the third used, I may well give it a try. My hopes won't be very high, however.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 21, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Again, solidly-plotted with plenty of action and adventure and introducing more memorable characters who mesh well with the lead characters from the first book. Particularly, we see more of the nonhuman population of this planet. Plus, Fancher's world-building skills are as good as her character developing skills are! (One of my favorite aspects of sf/f!)--Margaret Adamson Fincannon
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 15, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The title does not belie the content; this book is full of nasty plots, less-than-polite deals, and heart-wrenching compromises by more than one character. It's very refreshing to see a fantasy novel not only get outside the standard (and tired) formula, but bring the reader characters who are very memorable (and human). The not-so-human characters have interesting powers, but they aren't all-powerful and they even have "power failures" at inopportune (for the humans) moments. This is _not_ the usual medieval fantasy setting, and it definitely doesn't have the usual medieval fantasy feel to it. That may make certain fantasy readers cringe; if so, I suggest they go find something else. Flexibility of mind is required here, and if one is willing, the journey can be extraordinary!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

On October 24, 1988 in Oklahoma City, OK, at a suggestion from SF author C.J. Cherryh, I began writing. I kept writing because two hours after starting, I had to find out what happened. A little over a year later, I was the startled owner of a three book contract based on the rough draft of my first novel.

I've been writing ever since.

What appeals to me about writing in general is the constant challenge. I'm a generalist and writing is the one thing that will happily use every bit of information and experience you have to put into it. It's constant problem solving, method acting and soul-searching all rolled up into one 24/7 job.

What I love about writing SF/F is...everything. I love the optimism of believing there is a future for humanity. I love the challenge of imagining what that future might be. But most of all, I love the thrill of exploring that future with the interesting and courageous people I find living in it.

But SF/F has another, less obvious, appeal: the ability to write with a social conscience without preaching. It lets writers create worlds in which they can shed light on aspects of current society in a less charged environment. Its a way to help raise awareness without pointing fingers at anyone.

Yes, I have same gender relationships. Yes, I have gender-identification-challenged characters. Yes, sex and obsessive attraction are definitely issues in my books, as are power and its use and abuse. But the genre's one-step-removed perspective also lets me explore the human ramifications of a too-effective educational system (be careful what you wish for), or the curious problems of being siblings and growing up with the kind of misconceptions only close association can create, or what it means to a culture to lose an entire generation's knowledge.

Can you do this in contemporary fiction? Absolutely. But SF/F lets you add extreme ramifications...like what if those sibling misconceptions were suddenly stripped away with the ability to know exactly what those sibs were thinking? What if the educational system were so effective, the subsequent misinformation threatened the very fabric of the universe itself?

In my contemporary vampire fantasy...I hesitate to call it urban fantasy, because in all honesty, it hasn't the right tropes...I'm enjoying exploring the perspective of virtual immortality and what might make life worth living after three thousand years.

And with SF/F you can do all this while have a rip-roaring adventure! What more can a writer ask for?

My formal educational background is in Math, Physics, Astrophysics and Anthropology. I've raised and trained horses, flown planes, and at 51, took up figure skating. I love building things, from costumes to computers, model ships to koi ponds. I play a little guitar, some piano and like to sing.

I actually got started in the publishing world doing art. I worked on WaRP Graphics' Elfquest, helping with inking on the last few volumes of the original black and white, also helping with the colors in the original color volumes. After that, I moved on to my own project, an adaptation of C.J. Cherryh's first novel, Gate of Ivrel.

These days, after many years away from art, I find myself returning to it to do covers for my newest venture, Closed Circle Publications. A couple of years ago, C.J., Lynn Abbey and I decided to join the ebook movement and bring out both our orphaned backlist and some new works that weren't quite what NY was looking for but which our loyal readers were demanding.

I absolutely love hearing from my readers. My blog should echo here, but feel free to join us at:
http://www.janefancher.com/TheCaptainAndLime/