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Notre Dame


Price: $84.99 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by DVG Marketing and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
  • For 2-5 players
  • Historical theme
  • Tons of replay value
2 new from $84.00

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$84.99 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by DVG Marketing and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


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Notre Dame + Macao
Price for both: $182.99

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Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 12.1 x 8.7 x 2.7 inches ; 1.9 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • ASIN: B000Q84NVS
  • Item model number: RGG315
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 12 - 16 years
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #256,352 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
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Product Description

Product Description

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From the Manufacturer

The players take on the roles of the heads of influential families in Paris at the end of the 14th century. In the shadow of the Notre Dame cathedral, the players compete for prosperity and reputation. Each family controls one of the 3 -5 boroughs that surround the site of Notre Dame. As head of his family, each player tries, through clever use of his action cards, to advance the power and prestige of his family, but penalties are assessed those who do not take care of the health of the people who live in their borough. The player with the most prestige at the end is the winner.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Reverie on September 24, 2008
Format: Toy
Although this one probably looks really complicated from the box, the number of pieces, and frankly the instructions... it's actually very intuitive.

The flow of the game is pretty simple. It's split up in to 9 rounds. Each round you can do two actions and then hire a helper. There are three major resources in the game:
- Influence markers. These are the core of the game. Each player has a limited number, and you need them to gain the benefits of various buildings.
- Gold. This is used to hire helpers, and also can be donated to Notre Dame to gain Prestige.
- Prestige. This is basically points, you need to have the most at the end of 9 rounds to win.

There is also a Plague aspect where each round, your plague level goes up. You can control it by having influence at hospitals, but the punishment for maxing out plague is low, so it's usually not worth paying that much attention to.

There are some interesting aspects to the game. There are very few cards. You are in fact guaranteed to see every card every 3 rounds (after 3 rounds, you reshuffle, and that's repeated three times), so even though there is some randomness, you have a high degree of control over what you are able to do.

The game plays really fast, and like I said, it's really easy to learn. There are picture descriptions of what everything does, and the game has a really excellent manual with quick-reference material as needed.

It also plays great with 2-players, so if you don't have a full group, this is a great bet. This is one of my favorite 2-player strategy board games.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Atma Weapon on September 18, 2009
Format: Toy Verified Purchase
Product Description:

Notre Dame comes in the box pictured. Inside the box are included an attractive 8 page set of instructions and one reference insert (all printed in color on glossy letter-sized paper), 5 game board sections (more on this below), 3 Notre Dame tiles, 45 action cards, 15 person cards, 70 influence markers, 5 black markers, 5 trusted friends, 5 carriages, 1 bell-ringer, 20 messages, 25 gold coins, and 84 prestige tokens. There is also a black plastic item and card organizer that occupies the box. This organizer has two obvious compartments for cards and five other compartments (one in each corner as well as one large compartment in the center). I'm not really sure how exactly the organizer is intended to be used, though, and the plastic it is made out of is very thin and non-durable. My organizer had two cracks in the corners upon arrival (probably not too important). In terms of the game boards, each player gets one and you assemble them into the overall game board depending on how many players you have (and the Notre Dame tiles always go in the middle). The boards are irregular octagons made from cardboard with attractive designs and a nice glossy finish (the boards are a large part of what attracted me to the game in the first place). The cards are about the same size as regular playing cards and have attractive illustrations, and are probably a bit less durable than regular playing cards (they feel more cardboard-like and less plastic but I don't really know and it's not extremely noticeable). The influence markers and rat markers are small (maybe 1/4" cubed), colored wooden cubes. The trusted friends and carriages are made of the same wooden material but are in more complex shapes.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Godly Gadfly on January 22, 2012
Format: Toy
Notre Dame is and remains an outstanding euro, and several years after graduating off the production line as part of the class of 2007, has to be considered one of the highest achievers of the light-medium games from that year, by typifying some of the best that the genre can offer. It doesn't quite have the depth of classics like Puerto Rico or Caylus, but compensates for this by being more accessible, and serves well as a somewhat lighter and quicker game that is both intuitive and elegant. Yet it's not to be underestimated or considered as a game of luck - far from it, because Notre Dame offers tense and interesting decisions that require you to manage risk and manipulate a very tight economy, and carefully construct long range plans for your point-scoring objectives. There's just the right balance between tactical choices and strategic options, and the card drafting keeps the game interactive without being overly confrontational, while the finite number of possibilities keep the game from bogging down with analysis paralysis.

It's not too heavy, and yet there's also not a sense that so much strategic fat has been trimmed from the design that the end result is muddied by excessive randomness or that game-play becomes a mere shuffling of cardboard and wood with no real flavour, as is the case with some euros we've seen over the years. In many respects I suppose it is an exercise in efficiency, as many euros are, but the random draw of the cards forces you to plan different paths each game, the draft mechanic adds elements of fun and indirect interaction, and the risk management associated with the rats adds tension, all of which prevent it from being categorized with the mundane or blase.
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