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Rip-Off! The Scandalous Inside Story of the Management Consulting Money Machine Paperback – April 15, 2005

9 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Original Book Co (April 15, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1872188060
  • ISBN-13: 978-1872188065
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,904,392 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By manager on June 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
Reviewer: A reader from United Kingdom

Wish I'd had this a few years back. Press officers need to be as cynical as the journalists they work with, and working in this role with blue-chip companies there's plenty to be cynical about. I witnessed first hand some of the tactics in Mr Craig's book, particularly the management fads, first hand. I watched as companies' people were faced with, and confused and demotivated by, complete tosh whilst customers were left floundering. I hid, literally, from consultants who said that a company's PR people were its 'most important' and that they would be 'spending lots of time with me' (they say that to all the girls). I was angered most by the management that soaked up this rubbish (the MBAs being the biggest culprits, a subject also covered in 'Rip-off') and accused freethinkers of being negative whilst we tried to keep their businesses going. Where were you when we needed you most Mr Craig?
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Rob Lestrange on January 25, 2006
Format: Paperback
Great - I laughed and winced at the same time. It's all too horribly true. Buyers of consultancy are spending shareholders' and taxpayers' money, not their own. They have a duty to make sure that they are getting value from it. Often, they are not. As quoted from the FT, "No company or government department should let a management consultant through the door until they have read this book from cover to cover. Twice."
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Elijah Chingosho on July 17, 2006
Format: Paperback
The book provides some interesting insights into the consultancy business. It highlights some shortcomings about the services that consultants provide. The book is well written in simple and easy to follow language and style. Readers who have had experience working with consultants are likely to relate to some shortcomings highlighted in the book.

The book should be of interest to a wide readership including consultants, companies wishing to engage consultants, academics in the field and analysts as well as any reader wishing to be acquainted with the workings of consultants. Good consultants would no doubt be happy to guard against the failures highlighted in the book, of failing to provide practical workable advice and guidance to clients at reasonable fees. Managers in organizations would learn about more pragmatic ways to manage the relationship with consultants and ensure that they get value for their money. Students of the profession will learn some of the shortcomings that they need to avoid if they are to establish a trusting and mutually beneficial relationship with clients.

For the unethical consultants, well, the secrets of your tricks have been revealed, so it is time to change and avoid shaming a good and worthwhile profession.

I should also say that I have witnessed some excellent consultants that have done a wonderful job of turning some organizations around and saving the livelihoods of thousands of employees. At the end of the day, we have to appreciate that consultants give advice to change or improve a situation but have no direct control over the implementation.
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By Nick McCormick on January 2, 2015
Format: Paperback
After nearly 20 years in the field, David Craig has penned this expose on management consulting. As is evident by the title, he is not a big fan of his former profession. Is he projecting some sour grapes as a result of being thanklessly dumped from multiple consulting jobs by a bunch of incompetent boobs? Possibly. Regardless, he does put together a fairly compelling case.

Craig maintains that a very small percentage of consulting engagements (including his own), actually provide value to clients. If true, why is it that companies continue to shell out millions for consulting services that don't help? According to Craig, it's because those that purchase the services are not that bright. In fact, it's the poorest management teams that become so heavily dependent on consultants. They don't know how to effectively manage, so they look to the outside for assistance. Fortunately, for the myriad of consultants, there are plenty of such management teams in existence.

Craig goes into detail explaining the “art” of consulting, enumerating the dubious practices involved in: Winning a deal, staffing it, delivering it, selling add on business, maximizing profit, and even exiting gracefully when engagements fail miserably. He references many of his own experiences to illustrate.

If you've been in consulting for a while, you won't find many surprises. You will get a few chuckles. David writes with an irreverent style and does not hold back. Despite the laughs, if you have a conscience, you'll probably experience a bit of remorse for your past deeds as well.

For those that are buyers or potential buyers of consulting services, it would be a good idea to check this book out. It will help you decide if future engagements are warranted. If so, it will help you select the appropriate vendor, and manage the engagements effectively. Caveat Emptor!

--Nick McCormick, Author, "Lead Well and Prosper"
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Format: Paperback
Despite a satisfyingly indignant reaction from the consulting industry, David Craig's effort to lift the lid on his former employers is hardly as scandalous as the sub-title of this autobiographical exposé suggests. `Rip-Off' contains enough keen observation and analysis to convince anyone who knows the industry that Mr. Craig is an authentic insider. He understands the industry structure, business models and business development techniques and the reader may even be prepared to accept that he was a reasonably accomplished practitioner.
He is an also unashamedly sensational, selecting the most extreme of his experiences, spicing them with hyperbole and spinning each of them to build indignation or even outrage. But is it really a shock to find that consultants' fees have a 400% mark-up; or that the aim with any small project is to secure a multi-million deal; or that consultants may charge clients full fare for air travel and pocket the discounts from the airlines? To many, apparently, it is. Indeed Mr. Craig reserves much of his scorn for his consultancy-dependant clients whose habit is driving their companies into the hands of greedy and unaccountable outsiders; and that is why I can recommended this book. Business people may find all of this in a days work but they should keep a copy of `Rip-Off!' on their shelf for loan to colleagues - as an inoculation against the more dubious practices of their consultant vendors.
Mr. Craig reveals some common scams. He gives a sound description of the consultant's business model, explaining accurately how profits are delivered, not by high-fee partners, but by the numbers of junior consultants on surprisingly modest salaries. And he offers a sound account of standard Account Management techniques. But he struggled to fill 300 pages.
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