Rise & Fall of Butch Walker & The Let's-Go-Out-Tonites
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:$11.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on July 22, 2006
Really amazing third solo disc, goes in so many new directions, feels like Butch is really getting into the swing of being a distinct artist. The last disc was more of an exclamation point where this one is more of a period. It really makes a statement, it makes you stop and listen. It made me laugh when the only mention it got on Rolling Stone was about Avril being in the "Bethanphetamine" video, those losers are so out of touch. And by the end of the disc; just like every great entertainer Butch leaves you wanting more and more and more...

Track Listing:

1. Oooh...Aah...-pretty much just that.

2. Hot Girls in Good Moods- A throw back to T-Rex and Bowie, maybe Rob Zombie should be taking notes, for fans paying attention it has an "Alecia Amnesia" vibe.

3. Ladies & Gentlemen...The Let's Go Out Tonites- This song is fantastic for two reasons 1-butch makes fun of himself (Marie who has sex for free) 2- Butch makes fun of everybody else(Wolfmother and Yeah Yeah Yeah's refrences anyone?)

4. Bethamphetamine (Pretty Pretty)- The first single, which susprised me, Avril looks like hell in the video, what is there not to like. I hear "This Year's Model" Elvis Costello undertones.

5. Too Famous To Get Fully Dressed- I love this song! Butch is exploring his continued commentary on pop culture.

6. We're All Going Down- Dark! I like this, A very different direction. It's like what an emo song written by Tom Petty would sound like.

7. Dominoes- I think this is some sort of a Ben Folds inspired tune. I know they toured together a bit. I wonder what the story is?

8. Paid To Get Excited- This is by far the most bold song that Butch has ever released. I think it pretty much sums up who he is and what he believes. Very striking imagery.

9. Song w/o a Chorus- I have heard several versions of this live, I guess he kicked the idea around a while before deciding to record it. A big up-yours to the industry. He is one of the few artists who could pull a song like this off, it goes in so many different directions and still pulls into the station at the end of the line.

10. The Taste of Red- Once again a very different direction but I love it, its so dark. It makes me want to listen to it over and over. It opens up like "Far Away From Close" from the first solo album then goes into a retro 70's deal with strings and full orchestration. Really pretty.

11. Rich People Die Unhappy- Sounds a bit like Ryan Adams except its origional and he knows what he is talking about. I can see him sitting on the front porch staring at a broken down car in the front yard writing it.

12. This is the Sweetest Little Song- This might have been left off of the "Letters" disc. Very singer songwriter. F@#!ing beautiful. Really shows his writing abilities, puts him out there with Death Cab for Cutie and Bright Eyes. His artistic merit is electric on this track.

13. When Canyons Ruled the World- Singer-Songwriter track that leaves you wondering why people aren't out in the streets screaming his praises.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on July 24, 2006
It pretty much works like clockwork now a days. Every other year a new Butch Walker record. And everytime it's something completly different.

Where Butch's last solo record "Letters" was akin to the seventies singer-songwriter movement, "The Rise and Fall of Butch Walker and the Let's Go Tonites" is a pop glam record. Anf although it isn't as strong as "Letters", "The Rise and Fall" is still a helluva fun record.

"Hot Girls in a Good Mood" has a riff and arrangement that T. Rex's Marc Bolan would be proud of, all cocky arrogance and melody, not to mention one of the finest titles in a long time. "Ladies and Gentleman...The Let's Go Out Tonites" sounds more like David Bowie than anything Bowie's put out in the last ten years, where the lead off single "Bethamphetamine" is easily the cachiest single of the year that will be universally, and curiously, ignored by radio. "Dominoes" will appease those who liked "Letters" "Joan", and the final song "When Canyons Ruled the City" has a pleasant, almost Beatles-esque flow and vibe that closes the album on an upbeat note. And unlike most artists, Butch Walker has always had the ability to be reminscent of other artists while sounding completly like himself, no small feat friends.

Lyrically the record follows the usual Butch Walker charactors without sounding forced. If anything, this might be the most joyous jaded rock record you'll hear all year. And Butch's backing band, the The Let's Go Out Tonites don't necessarily add a lot to the songs, but they play with energy and a looseness that was lacking from the last two Butch Walker solo records.

The only flaw I have with this record is that Butch front loaded the record with it's strongest songs, leaving the mid section to be a little dull at times, though nothing hear sounds like filler as such.

Overall "The Rise and Fall of Butch Walker and the Let's Go Out Tonites" is a worthy addition to Walker almost uniformally good cannon of songs. And though it isn't as strong as "Letters"-which mixed everything about Walker perfectly into a nice compact package-it should still appeal to anyone who likes the man.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on August 24, 2006
Dominoes was written about Butch's grandmother Grace, and his grandfather. He had an accident and got alzheimers. (sp?). She was sharp as a nail, yet very weak. He on the other hand was strong as an ox, and couldnt remember where he was. They were this amazing support system for each other :( Butch wrote this song shortly after Grace passed away. The DAY BEFORE he was to come home to Georiga and play it for his grandfather and family, his grandfather passed away. If you get the chance to see Butch in concert this year, and he sits down at the piano to tell the story, I am willing to bet of those who are true Walker fans, there will not be a dry eye in the house.

"50 years of time, an accident would take my mind, shortly have to take the wife away from me... everybody knows, memories will keep you alive. Some of them can't be erased. If I remember one today, let if be of Grace."

I find that this album was not as strong as letters was, but it holds it's own against all M3 albums. Its a very glam rock cd, and as much as he's giving to other artists (avril, etc) I'm surprised he has so much to give back to his true fans who don't listen to the radio.

My fave song on the album is "Taste of Red". Something about it is very southern, very true, and of course, very Butch. Of all the concerts I have been to, I have yet to see him without his "taste of red".

C'mon potential buyer... take a chance. Worst case is you at least buy a song or two on iTunes.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on July 11, 2006
Butch Walker is not an artist that rests on his laurels. After the breakup of The Marvelous 3, he made a very good arena rock record with "Left of Self Centered." Walker followed it up with 2004's brilliant "Letters," which critics unfairly labeled an emo record, but actually was a '70s singer songwriter affair. Walker could have easily made a sequel to "Letters," but instead he takes us in another direction entirely.

To fans who loved the soothing sounds of "Letters," "The Rise and Fall of the Let's Go Out Tonites" will seem quite offputting. Walker has picked up the electric guitar again, and almost every track is bathed in crunchy riffs. Walker wears his influences on his sleeves here: "Hot Girls in Good Moods" is ripped from T. Rex, "Bethamphetimine (Pretty Pretty)" sounds like Transformer era Lou Reed. Despite cribbing from his favorite artists, it never feels like plagerism. It feels as if Walker is trying to introduce these great artists to a new generation.

Besides the glam inspired rock, Walker has written some of the best ballads of his career. "Dominoes," "We're All Going Down" and especially "This is the Sweetest Little Song" are all achingly beautiful. Unlike the ballads on "Letters," which were often bitter and heartbroken, these are lush and whistful and have an undercurrent of hope running through.

My one problem with the album is the production. The background vocals are pushed to the background and can barely be heard. However, this is a very minor issue when the songs are so good.

All in all, this record was everything I'd hoped for in a new Butch Walker record. This is one of the best releases of 2006.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 5, 2007
I discovered Butch Walker over 2 years ago when i heard the song "Mixtape" on a TV soundtrack. The song immediatly stood out among all the others with the piano intro, the outstanding lyrics, and a great voice. Since then, Butch Walker has become my favorite artist in music and I have built a huge collection of his solo albums, live material, rare tracks, and all of the music I could find from his previous band the Marvelous 3. While I think "Letters" beats this one out by a nose, this album is one of the best to be released in a long time. If music sales were actually based on talent, then Butch Walker would be at the top of the pack. Not only is he a brilliant and original vocalist, a wicked guitar player, and the best performer i've ever seen, his songwriting abilities are better than those of any living musician. I realize the boldness of this claim, and will stand by it forever more. One listen to any of his albums will reveal exactly why this claim is true.

Walker, who seemed infinitely depressed on "Letters" is back to his happy and humorous self, something which is made immediatly clear by the title of the album. "The Rise And Fall Of Butch Walker And The Lets Go Out Tonites!" borrows from the title of the David Bowie album ("Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars") and for good reason, because the glam-rock influences are essentially the theme of this album. The opening track, "Hot Girls In Good Moods" is an infectiously catchy rocker and sets the tone for the rest of the album. It sounds like nothing else walker has ever done before, which seems to becoming customary with each album as his sound progresses. The next track, "Ladies & Gentlemen The Lets Go Out Tonites" is equally catchy with a jazzy piano riff igniting the background as Walker sings and plays. The song also begins a theme of anti-conformity that runs throughout the album (everybody telling the some joke/singing the same chorus to a song that hasnt even been wrote) (there is no right or right or wrong way for certain/make up your own version sing along).

The first single "Bethamphetamine" utilizes another sweet piano intro before exploding into an excellent rock song. This one has some great vocals as well. The catchy song streak continues with "Too Famous To Get Fully Dressed", and then Butch finally slows it down with "We're All Going Down", by far the weakest song on the album (or on any Butch album for that matter). It's not really bad, but it's just kind of...odd and Butch keeps doing this weird thing with his voice on the chorus(its hard to explain). The song just isnt very good and kind of hurts the mood of the album. Still, its better than almost all of the music out there right now.

As it turns out, it doesnt really matter because he completely makes up for it on "Dominoes", my personal favorite songs on the album. The band isnt needed for this one where Butch just sings and plays piano (with and brilliant string section to enhance it even more. Its this albums "Joan". The song is about his girlfriends grandparents who married very young and were together for most of their lives. The woman (named Grace) eventually passed away, and the man (who has alzheimers)plays a game of dominoes to try to remember her. The song is absolutely gorgeous (especially the vocals on the chorus) and is so beautifully written that it would be hard not to be moved by it.

However, Butch doesnt let you dwell on it for to long, because the next track brings things back to the uptempo. "Paid To Get Excited" is an anti-conformist, anti-bush anthem and is by far the loudest track on the album. It's actually one of the best anti-bush songs i've ever heard with the chorus proclaiming: "be free to love the ones you love/free to hate the ones you hate/free to like the land you live on not the one who leads". The songs builds to the final verse where butch forgoes good vocals for a scream. Normally this would really annoy me, but it completely works here, mostly because the song is so well written. Not the best track, but its still addicting. "Song Without A Chorus" continues the theme where Butch spews all his hate for record labels who all want to find the same kind of boring pop artist, and reflects on his experience with the marvelous 3 ("well they'll probably say this sucks you know but i dont really care/ and i'll use the gunshot words so it won't get on the air"). When Butch was with the marvelous 3, the record label kept trying to control everything butch did, so the band decided to make an album they knew the label wouldnt approve of (the arena rock based "ReadySexGo"). This led to the label's decision to cut promotion at which point the band decided to break up.

But of course things kept going, as they do now. The next track "The Taste of Red" is another candidate for best track on the album. Not only is the one of the most infectiously catchy songs on the album, but one of the most catchy songs i've ever heard. Add another excellent string arrangement and you have a truly classic song. "Rich People Die Unhappy" moves things from glam-rock to alt-country. The song is completely different from anything Butch has ever done before. Most artists would never even dream of the genre switching the Butch does throughout this album, but he has the talent to pull it off, and this is another great track (though not a favorite for me). The oddly titled "This Is The Sweetest Little Song" is another great, mostly acoustic song that serves to begin winding down the album. The verse lyrics are some of the finest on the album.

However, the closer "When The Canyons Ruled The City" is simply in a different league. The lyrics are genius, built around a clever concept of personification. The song is a triumphant singer-songwriter opus, and is the only song that could close this incredible album (and the other song that could be the album's best). Brilliant vocals, songwriting, instrumentation, everything. Easily one of the best songs Walker has ever written.

In the end, every excellent song comes together to form a truly incredible and addicting work. Since it's release, each and every one of this albums tracks has breached my itunes top 25 most played, just another testament to its greatness. This man also puts on an excellent live show, and at only around $15, you get more for your money than just about every other band out there (especially since he usually brings 2 other bands along with him).

3/4 of a year later and I still cannot get enough of this album. That should be enough to convince anyone to buy it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Butch delivers... again.

I still think "Letters" was his best solo effort - but something tells me this new disc is going to continue to grow on me.

It's the acoustic songwriter's disc "Letters" was... nor is it the pop-punk-metal-rock effort that "Left of Self-Centered" was -- although ANOTHER great disc in its own right.

"The Let's Go Out Tonites" disc is the next logical step in Butch Walker's musical journey. You hear the 70s influences of Queen, Bowie, Cheap Trick, Elvis Costello... hell, I even hear an ELO harmony in one song.

He assembled a band - and now looks the part (eclectic frontman leading 7-piece band.) When I saw the video for "Bethamphetamine" - the back up singer immediately conjured up images of Wendy & Lisa from the Prince and the Revolution era.

The young teenage pop fans who got on the Butch bandwagon (seeing hip open for Avril Lavigne) might be confused by this effort. There are no tunes like 'Mixtape', 'Maybe It's Just Me', 'Best Thing You Never Had', etc. No anthem-atic power ballad like 'Sober' either.

Butch's MySpace tour last year was full of obscure, up-and-coming artists (Imogen Heap, Carey Bros., Josh Radin, Peter Searcy, etc.) If you caught a show, you saw him jamming with all artists, expanding his musical horizons and really getting further away from the pop-style songs he crafted in the past - be it for Avril, American Hi-Fi, Bowling For Soup, etc.

All the groups on the MySpace Tour joined him on stage for "When Canyons Ruled The City". I knew after that show he was going a new direction.

So many artists head back into the studio and just attempt to recreate the formula of a former hit record (i.e. - Nickelback, Hoobastank, Limp Bizkit, Lifehouse, etc.)

Not Butch.

From SouthGang, to The Floyds, to Marvelous 3, to the "Left of Self-Centered" era, to "Letters" and now this new disc -- it's all about evolving, keeping it fresh, growing musically and expanding the horizons.

Some of my friends in the past have thought Butch was too glossy or pop influenced. I could pick and choose a few songs to play here and there, knowing they'd approve - but would find other ones too sing-songy or pop.

Not this disc. Start to finish, this is the kind of disc that even the music snobs will appreciate -- right there next to the most diehard fan of his.

Great effort. I am sure a month from now I will play this thing non stop and will know every word. It's been in my possession 24 hours and I've already listened to it 4 times in its entirety.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 19, 2009
You will notice that the Let's-Go-Out Tonites appear on one album and one album only. This might be because the go-go dancer, tambourine players really didn't add anything to Butch Walker's album that he himself couldn't achieve. Butch Walker's third album was a venture into a more mature and folk influenced sound that wasn't all that it could have been. The album had its staple anthems such as, "Bethamphetamine (Pretty Pretty)" and "Hot Girls in Good Moods." However, songs that really should have been given credit like, "Taste of Red" and "Canyons" fall by the wayside on the CD to make room for "bigger" songs. Had Walker used a song like "Canyons" as a template for the album instead of "Hot Girls in Good Moods," he would have had a much better album; a more appropriate stepping-stone to SYCAMORE MEADOWS.

The RISE & FALL OF BUTCH WALKER & THE LET'S GO-OUT-TONITES falls short of what it is so desperately trying to do. The album has its gems such as "Song Without a Chorus" [which coincidentally is better on the Hotel Cafe Tour 2005 CD], "Taste of Red", and "Canyons." However, Butch Walker could have made a more solid album that better reflected his growth as an artist.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on July 14, 2006
A suprise when I came across it in the store (missed it's release notes), this album by butch walker again shows his evolution as a singer/songwriter. Picking up the electrics again, he mixed back into this album some of the great sound of the Marvelous 3 with some of his newer sound from his last album letters, which was a pleasent departure from his prior music. You have to love the title Bethamphetamine. In all, a nice flowing album, produced and mixed well, and a great addition to the butch walker collection with his southgang, marvelous 3, and solo projects. Don't forget about his work as producer of the groups like "injected" and "Bowling for Soup" last two albums, which again showcase his talents.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 19, 2006
Butch is the king of indie rock n roll. Great new record. BUY IT!!!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on August 10, 2006
So, what does Butch Walker sound like?

Imagine you're having lunch in the cafeteria in the Brill Building. As soon as you sit down, Gerry Goffin and Carole King come over to join you. Neil Sedaka walks by and waves. Phil Spector stops by to say hello, too. Then, Nicky Chinn and Mike Chapman sit down. Burt Bacharach and Hal David come in, and Burt pauses to tell you not to eat the chicken.

You finish your lunch, and decide you want some ice cream, so you go get in line behind John Lennon. As you wait, Robin Zander and Rick Nielsen walk up behind you, talking about what a nice day it is.

You get your ice cream, and you leave. When you walk outside, you see a couple of guys down the street with a three card monte table set up. You stop and play, just once, and you win. As you take their money, you realize that the guys are Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley.

Then, you jump in a cab, and Ric Ocasek takes you back to your hotel.

That's what Butch Walker sounds like.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.