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The Rising of the Moon (Virago Modern Classics) Paperback – November 1, 1996


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Paperback, November 1, 1996
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Product Details

  • Series: Virago Modern Classics (Book 419)
  • Paperback: 223 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group (November 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1860490743
  • ISBN-13: 978-1860490743
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 4.9 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,826,804 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

** 'A delightfully subversive read. Liza Cody ** 'Her tour-de-force. Philip Larkin

From the Publisher

Virago¹s distinguished Modern Classics series is dedicated to the celebration of women writers of the 19th and 20th centuries and to the rediscovery and reprinting of their work.

More About the Author

Gladys Mitchell was born in the village of Cowley, Oxford, in April 1901. She was educated at the Rothschild School in Brentford, the Green School in Isleworth, and at Goldsmiths and University Colleges in London. For many years Miss Mitchell taught history and English, swimming, and games. She retired from this work in 1950 but became so bored without the constant stimulus and irritation of teaching that she accepted a post at the Matthew Arnold School in Staines, where she taught English and history, wrote the annual school play, and coached hurdling. She was a member of the Detection Club, the PEN, the Middlesex Education Society, and the British Olympic Association. Her father's family are Scots, and a Scottish influence has appeared in some of her books.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Rising of the Moon is beautifully written. Two young brothers, Simon, age 13 and Keith, age 11 are orphaned but living a fairly idyllic childhood on a farm with their goodtime older brother, stressed, prim sister-in-law and the family's delectable female lodger. The first grisly murder excites the boys' curiousity and as they play amateur detective their clumsy efforts to help their married brother make him appear guilty. Beatrice Bradley appears midway through the book, gaining their confidence and trust. The charm of the book is the style. Mitchell evokes small town/country life in postwar England. The boys fish, plan to sneak into the circus, and live a very independent life beneath the noses of their pub hopping brother and his more conventional wife.
Readers may guess the identity of the murderer but the boys are so likeable, the lovely lodger so charming that the innocence of childhood versus the horrors of a multiple killer make for a striking contrast.
HOpefully since Diana Rigg's series features the (Beatrice) Adela Bradley character the book will again appear in print.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A. Anderson on March 13, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Young women are dropping like flies in this tale of murder in a small, pre-WWII English village, but this is not quite a 'cozy' tale. The narrator, Simon Innes, is 13 years old and describes himself as the Watson to his 11-year old brother Keith. They live with their brother, Jack, and his slightly shrewish wife and with their lodger, a lovely young woman named Christina, whom the boys adore...and perhaps Jack adores as well. As as it is school holidays, they have time on their hands to investigate. A second murder seems to implicate Jack. The town is populated by the odd but intriguing keeper of an 'antique' shop, the local constable who is one of Christina's admirers and the mysterious, repellent 'rag and bone' man. Scotland Yard is called in, and arrives with Mrs. Bradley, a psychologist with 'claw like hands' who is, in fact, the true detective of the piece.

It takes a talented writer to use the point of view of children to tell a tale, but allows an innocent voice to suggest that what they see is better understood by the reader than the narrator. Simon and Keith both charming, not quite fearless, and dogged in their pursuit of trying to figure out who done it. Gladys Mitchell has done a lovely job of putting you into the place, the time and the mindset of a gentler time, when murder was a more horrible happenstance than in modern day. Her characters take a little bit of a stretch to be entirely believable, but the reader who is willing to suspend disbelief for a while will find the exploits of the kids, and the clear eyed conclusions of Mrs Bradley a well done and thoroughly enjoyable read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sally tarbox on January 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
When a murder occurs at an Easter circus, 11 year old Keith observes to his 13 your old brother "I'm not at all sure this isn't better, in a way, than the circus. After all, the circus only lasts one afternoon, and it's an awful sweat to get in unless you pay. This murder might last us all the holidays."
But the murder is just the first in a series of knife killings in the 1930s town of Brentford. Left largely to their own devices, the boys take to creeping out at night sleuthing by moonlight. But who could it be: the rag and bone man? their elderly friend and antique dealer, Mrs Cockerton? their elder brother (and guardian) Jack? or is Jack protecting his friend Danny?
And will their lovely lodger Christina remain safe?
When eccentric home office psychologist Mrs Bradbury is drafted in to help with the case, she and the boys liaise to catch the killer.
Quite an engaging if improbable read, set in the world of yesteryear.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ron on September 17, 2010
Format: Paperback
Mitchell was a wonderful writer and this book is very satisfying. Its narrator is a 13 year old boy (although he seems older than his years), who with his 11 year old brother lead a comfortable life despite losing both parents and having to live with their older married brother. The murders start almost immediately, but Mrs. Bradley doesn't appear for 100 pages, so it's mostly the boys observations that carry the story.

My one minor gripe is the absence of a map of the area, since there are so many descriptions of the layout of the town and various canals, bridges, streets, farms, manor houses, etc., that it would have been fun to follow the travels along graphically.

Recommended.
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By Liv on August 27, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author writes beautifully and is a master at evoking emotion. This story is particularly fascinating because it is told through the eyes of a young boy. The only reason I didn't give 5 stars is that I really like more development of motives and understanding of the criminal in my mysteries. There were hints at why the crime was committed but I like that really satisfying "no loose ends" kind of an ending, and this one seemed almost hurried when you consider how carefully and slowly the rest of the story is spun.
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