Qty:1
  • List Price: $6.99
  • Save: $0.70 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ELIGIBLE FOR *FREE* SUPER SAVER SHIPPING. AMAZON CUSTOMER SERVICE WITH DELIVERY TRACKING. Book may have moderate wear to corners and edges. CD may or may not be included. Could be ex-library.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Rising Voices: Writings of Young Native Americans Mass Market Paperback – July 5, 1993


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.50
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.29
$2.89 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Frequently Bought Together

Rising Voices: Writings of Young Native Americans + The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
Price for both: $19.79

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Mass Market Paperback: 131 pages
  • Publisher: Ivy Books; Reprint edition (July 5, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0804111677
  • ISBN-13: 978-0804111676
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #668,417 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

An astonishing collection of poems and essays written by young contemporary Native Americans. Words of protest against prejudice and oppression, poems of estrangement and pain, cries for lost worlds and lost identities -- but also songs of celebration and joy for the future.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Bates on April 17, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
How often does a teacher find a book that is written totally on the level of their students? This is a little anthology of essays and poetry written by Native American students. It gives such insight into what these young people feel and think. The thoughts are contemporary but show us the heritage and its importance - but also the struggle it can cause. These selections range from third grade through high school. I consider it a must for teaching multi-cultural lit. The thoughts can be compared to what the students feel - especially when it comes to heritage. Some are sad - some defiant - some confident and joyful. These will get students thinking and discussing. A treasure!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mazza HALL OF FAME on January 1, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Rising Voices: Writings of Young Native Americans" is an anthology of pieces selected by Arlene Hirschfelder and Beverly R. Singer. There are more than 60 entries, most of them very short. About 140 pages long, the anthology encompasses both poetry and prose. Each piece is accompanied by a short blurb which tells about the author and, if applicable, describes the piece's prior publication history.

The anthology has a wide scope. Its authors represent many parts of the United States: New Mexico, Alaska, Arizona, Utah, Montana, and other states. Also represented are many Indian nations: Coeur d'Alene, Inuit, Navajo, Cree, Pima, Zuni, etc. The pieces span over a century, from the 1880s to the 1990s. The book is divided into six thematic sections: "Identity," "Family," "Homelands," "Ritual and Ceremony," "Education," and "Harsh Realities."

Some of my favorite selections are as follows. "My Poems," by Alan Barlow: a poem with particularly vivid imagery. "My Role as a Native American," by Kimberly Kai Rapada: an ironic prose memoir about receiving a role in a school production of "The Wizard of Oz." "As I Dance," by Autumn White Clay: an evocative poem that celebrates dance. "Misconceptions about the Aleutians," by Katie Mobeck: a feisty prose piece that challenges stereotypes about the author's people.

Other topics covered include jewelry, food, prayer, role models, Native language, and the Indian relationship to the bison. A particularly important recurring theme is the tension that comes with living between the white and Indian worlds. As in other youth anthologies I have read, some of the pieces struck me as somewhat underdeveloped. But the overall strength of the collection is impressive. The voices in this book are at times satiric, ironic, and resistant, but also celebrate the joys and beauty of the Indian peoples, their lands, and their cultures. A solid choice for both classroom use and individual reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By New Jersey Parent on July 4, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been reading this to my adopted 8-year-old who is 1/4 Native American. Even though the book is directed at kids a little older she still enjoys it. Many of the items in the book reflect feelings of being different or feelings of isolation and/or discrimination. This applies to my daughter who is sensitive about being adopted, and she can see that many other children feel the way she does for many different reasons. The book also gives her valuable insight into her background.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 10 people found the following review helpful By pintopride on May 18, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The book I'm reading is rising voices. I picked this book because Native Americans wrote it. T his book has poems about young Natives. The story I'm reading is " I'm a Navajo". The kid that is telling us about him being Navajo and he said " he don't act like a Navajo and also he said that a Navajo wears a lot of necklaces and belts that's pin by a Navajo silversmith .He also said that his mom never live in a taught him how to pray and he has pray for a little girl when she got sick. He had long hair and he didn't care to knot it into a ponytail.

The little boy has to live like a Navajo for the whole summer. The Navajo boy is to learn how to be a Navajo and how to speak the Navajo way. The boy's mom told him to learn how to a Navajo and to show everyone that he can be a true Navajo. The kid had to become one of the people that can do ceremony on other people and the way he can do that is to learn how to become a Navajo. The boy turned 15 then he had to learn how to kill and skin a sheep.

The boy has a girlfriend that's all into Navajo ways her family do all of the Navajo stuff like pow wow and all the stuff that Navajo people like to do over the summer. The girl met his family and she notice that his family is not like her family. So they help the boy become a true Navajo. So she took him to a Hogan and lived in there for three weeks. He didn't like the way they ate their food. He said that they eat a lot of mutton and fry bread. So one day he had to try the food because that was the only thing they had to eat in three weeks living in a Hogan. He told her that he never been inside a teepee in his life. So later that summer he finally become a true Navajo. His family was so happy for him and what he did for the summer.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?