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  • Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow [ORIGINAL RECORDING REMASTERED]
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Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow [ORIGINAL RECORDING REMASTERED] Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered


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Audio CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, April 27, 1999
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Frequently Bought Together

Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow [ORIGINAL RECORDING REMASTERED] + Rainbow Rising (Remastered) + Long Live Rock `n' Roll [Remastered]
Price for all three: $17.26

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Editorial Reviews

Their 1975 debut (a #30 album!), with Sixteenth Century Greensleeves; Man on the Silver Mountain , and seven more.

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
  1. Man On The Silver Mountain (Album Version) 4:41$1.29  Buy MP3 
  2. Self Portrait 3:16$1.29  Buy MP3 
  3. Black Sheep Of The Family 3:22$1.29  Buy MP3 
  4. Catch The Rainbow (Album Version) 6:39$1.29  Buy MP3 
  5. Snake Charmer 4:32$1.29  Buy MP3 
  6. The Temple Of The King 4:44$1.29  Buy MP3 
  7. If You Don't Like Rock N Roll 2:37$1.29  Buy MP3 
  8. Sixteenth Century Greensleeves 3:31$1.29  Buy MP3 
  9. Still I'm Sad 3:53$1.29  Buy MP3 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 27, 1999)
  • Original Release Date: 1999
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Polydor
  • ASIN: B00000IMTE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (105 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,458 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Robert J. Schneider on April 26, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Rainbow was formed in 1975 by lead guitar legend Ritchie Blackmore immediately after leaving Deep Purple. He met and struck up a friendship with Ronnie James Dio, who was fronting the bluesy hard rock band Elf. Ritchie was so impressed with Ronnie and the band that he formed Rainbow out of Elf. In other words, when they first began, Rainbow was basically Elf (minus their own lead guitarist, of course) plus Ritchie Blackmore.
Although Elf was basically a bar-room boogie band, both Ritchie and Ronnie envisioned Rainbow to be more of a progressive metal outfit with lyrics concentrating on mystical, medieval, and occult themes. This is why Rainbow's first record has both of these styles represented on it.
It begins with what might be the greatest Rainbow song ever (certainly one of their greatest anyway, as well as one of THE best songs from 1975), a 4 1/2-minute song called "Man On The Silver Mountain." This is the original song that defined Rainbow's music: it starts with a good basic electric guitar riff, then the bass, drums and keyboards join in for support, and when Ronnie James Dio starts to sing, it quickly begins to take shape as the progressive heavy metal song it is. And it has one amazing guitar solo by Ritchie Blackmore!
"Self Portrait" is also a dynamic prog-metal tune, but "Black Sheep Of The Family" is a straight-ahead, slightly bluesy hard rock tune with some great slide guitar work by Blackmore, and is obviously one of the Elf-penned contributions to this record. It is also quite infectious; once you hear it, you can't get it out of your mind for hours.
"Catch The Rainbow," at six and a half minutes long, is the only long song on this album, and is also the most progressive-sounding.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jeff. D (jeffcone9@aol.com) on November 18, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This is one of the most amazing guitar oriented albums of all time. Every guitar solo is an absolute masterpiece. Each solo is a song within itself, brilliantly done with incredible feeling and restraint. None of this pointless rambling up and down, and all over scales, that we hear so much of today. So melodic and so well done. Dio is amazing as well! I even like the bass playing by Craig Gruber. This album is one of those few albums that have a real "feel" that carries through every tune. I remember back in 1975 and how it never left my turntable for an entire summer. This is Blackmore's best effort in the heavy genre. Try "Rainbow Rising" as well. If your a real fan of his playing check out the acoustic "Shadow of the Moon". The album is quite unique and again projects a certian kind of "feel"consistent with those albums that will be remembered.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 12, 1999
Format: Audio CD
It was pretty obvious that Deep Purple was getting tired and a little over ripe by '75, so Ritchie Blackmore decided he needed a new vechcle to showcase his soloing and riffing talents. What better vocalist to compliment him than one dimunitive Ronnie James Dio. Though Ronnie was little-known at the time, in fact only known as lead honky-tonker of rollicking band Elf, Ritchie could hear the startling talent that was sure to blossom into something mighty fine. Anyway, this album pretty much sounds like Elf's previous "Trying to Burn the Sun" with Ritchie on leads and a little mysticism. The sound here is considerably more down to earth than the grand sound they would acheive (with a new band) on "Rising." I really like this album for the old world warmth is displays. The tempos are often slow to mid, and the solos usually more delicate and restrained. Songs like "Man on the SIlver Mountain," "Temple of the KIng" and "Sixteenth Century Greensleves" are as good as Rainbow ever put out. Though "Snake Charmer" and "Black Sheep..." are a couple of missteps. Dig those cowbells on "Still I'm Sad."
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Wise_Guy on December 7, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I wish I had my old vinyl to run a comparison test. I seem to remember some really majestic singing on this album. This album has been "remastered" which more often than not appears to be a euphamism for made-substantially-worse-than-the-original. The instrumentals overpower the vocals on Man on the Silver Mountain and Black Sheep of the Family. If You Don't Like Rock-n-Roll may as well be an instrumental arrangement.

On the bright side, the sound is really brilliant so there is hope for the next remastering, perhaps someone with an appreciation for great rock can make this the 5 that it should be.

Here is a little hint for whoever runs these projects... If I wanted to listen to music that thumps, I would just open my window and listen to the sociopaths driving down the street.

Here is a question for Amazon... Why do the samples sound better than the CD? Whover produces the samples should be doing the entire album.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Gene Kodadek on May 11, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Guitarist Ritchie Blackmore had his work cut out for him trying to put together a project that would do justice to the work he had done in Deep Purple. Miraculously he managed it with Rainbow, recruiting singer Ronnie James Dio from Elf, a band that had been opening for Purple for several years. With Dio as a songwriting partner and using the other members of Elf (except for the guitarist) as session musicians he recorded Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow. Released in 1975, this powerful debut is at least as good as anything Deep Purple ever recorded and a springboard for even greater things to come.

First the performances. Maestro Ritchie Blackmore whips out his patented guitar histrionics while displaying a level of subtlety and finesse only hinted at in his previous work. Ronnie James Dio proves immediately that he is one of the two or three finest rock vocalists ever, letting loose in a captivating and powerful way. Dio's former Elf bandmates deliver here as well. Drummer Gary Driscoll and bassist Craig Gruber make for a funky and grooving rhythm section, and pianist Micky Lee Soule comports himself well, although he seems a bit restricted by the guitar-oriented sound Blackmore was trying to acheive with Rainbow. The album is reasonably well recorded, but not spectacularly so. This is suprising considering that it's the legendary Martin Birch in the producer's chair. One assumes that deadlines and budgetary restrictions compromised his efforts somewhat.

The songwriting team of Blackmore and Dio is immediately a winner, producing some of the finest rock music in the history of the genre. Dio's melodic sense and sword-and-sorcery lyricism works very well with Blackmore's trademark classically-inspired heavy riffage.
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Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow [ORIGINAL RECORDING REMASTERED]
This item: Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow [ORIGINAL RECORDING REMASTERED]
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