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3.9 out of 5 stars
Riviera: The Promised Land - Sony PSP
Platform for Display: Sony PSPChange
Price:$99.99 - $199.88
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on October 25, 2008
Platform for Display: Sony PSP
Graphics: 7.5/10
PSP > GBA
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The graphics of Riviera are simple, a throwback to the days of sprite-based RPGs. That said, the graphics are very well done. Though the animation and details of the sprites of the characters and enemy are simple, they are well done. The environments of the game are very simple backdrops, but again they are very well made.

What really makes the game pop graphic-wise, however, are the CG animations and the character portraits. They are in an anime-style, and very well made, helping to you picture the story in your head, instead of leaving you to wonder what's really going on in that 2D world.

The bigger, crisper screen of the PSP helps to make the graphics much better than the GBA counter-part.

Sound: 7/10
PSP=GBA
--
The PSP version of Riviera has a CD-quality remastered soundtrack, and is now completely voice-acted. The voices are available in English and Japanese. This is a plus, especially if you want either 1) a different experience in another play though or 2) think the english voices are annoying.

However, in battles the music and sound effects seem flat compared the the GBA version of the game, particularly with the use of the OverDrive skills.

Gameplay: 8/10
PSP > GBA
--
Riviera's gameplay is solid, but can get a little repetitive. You are not able to move around as you normally do in RPGs, but instead travel between rooms by using the directional buttons, and look around those rooms using ques call 'Triggers'. What this is is a little balloon on the screen with a directional arrow and description of what you'll be looking at. This is a very unique way of driving an RPG, but as stated earlier, can get a little repetitive.

The battle system is completely turn-based. When entering battle, you will be asked to pick a formation (either 2 in front, one in back; or one in front, two in back) and which three party members you will want to battle. Then, you will pick 4 items to bring with you. These can be anything from weapons, to potions to defensive items. The battle progresses turns based upon 'Wait'. When 'wait' reaches 0, it is that persons turn. The amount of wait is based upon which items you use, and skills you use.

Riviera does not used levels for your characters, like most RPGs. To grow stronger you do something called 'Skil up' by using weapons and gaining experience with that weapon. When you 'Skill up', your health and various attributes increase, and you gain a skill which can be used with that item.

The game also makes extensive use of the OverDrive meter. This meters has 4 tiers. Levels 0-3. At level 0, you can't use any skills. When it reaches level 1, you can use level 1 skill. The same is for level 2 and 3. The meter is filled by damaging your enemies, and being damaged by your enemies.

Overall: 7.5/10
--
Overall, Riviera is a solid RPG, and I would recommend it to casual to moderate RPG players. More hardcore players might not like it.

Compared to the GBA version, the PSP version is not quite as energetic, however, it makes up for it by better driving the storyline with the full vocal tracks.

If you already own the GBA version, then you need not worry about this version (Unless you want to see the new cutscenes and extra episode, and want to hear the full vocals). If you have not purchased this game, then I recommend the PSP version over the GBA version.

(Review based upon ~35 hours of GBA play and ~15 of PSP)
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on July 27, 2007
Platform for Display: Sony PSP
Considering the fact that I own the Gameboy Advance version of this game and gave it a good review sometime back, I decided to rent this version to see how much better this version is compared to my Gameboy Advance version and give you my honest opinion on it. In some ways, I'm glad that I did rent it first. Yet, seeing as to how I'm a big fan of Riviera, I'll probably buy it at some point but not for obvious reasons concerning this PSP version. For the most part, the PSP Riviera is the exact same game I played on the Gameboy Advance. The noticable differences in the game are that they improved the graphics as well as the soundtrack, have more voiceacting in the game, added a few new cutscenes, included a dual language functional and reworked the controls all for the PSP port. You play Ein, a Grim Angel, who's been sent to Riviera to start 'the Retribution' that will destroy Riviera, and all the demons that have taken over there, once and for all. That's where the story begins. For those of you new to Riviera, Riviera is not your 'typical' traditional style RPG(like Final Fantasy, Breath of Fire or Golden Sun). Combat and Navigation in the game is alot different than your normal traditional RPG and that is what makes this game so unique & so much fun to play. I won't go into detail about it myself. I'd simply like to direct you to the Gameboy Advance reviews of this game as there are plenty of reviews there that will explain it to you. Either that or look back here later on as I'm sure someone will, eventually, explain it in these reviews. Depending on how you play the game, you'll get more than 40+ hours of gameplay and, as I stated in my GBA Riviera review, RPGs like this one only come along only once in awhile. It'd be a crime missing this one. Yet, I will have to say that if you already own the GBA Riviera- you're better off sticking with that game as there's not much new here to warrant a purchase. But, if you're new to the game, I would suggest you purchase the PSP version. I would have loved to have seen a new episode in the Riviera saga, myself, but Developer Sting thought it was necessary to do another port of the original for the PSP. Knowing our luck, next up will probably be a port of their next game after Riviera which was Yggdra Union. I just hope, at some point, they give us fans the game we want.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2007
Platform for Display: Sony PSP
This is NOT your typical "dungeon-crawl" style RPG. Each battle is "graded," and how well you do determines the number of actions you can take later. There's also many places where you will be required to match buttons, hit a button at a certain time as a meter moves up and down, or numerous other tricks-of-dexterity.

That said, the graphics and sound is amazing and the story is really easy to get into. If you can handle a little frustration and some thinking, you may want to look at this game.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 2, 2011
Platform for Display: Sony PSP
I bought Riviera the day it came out on a Nintendo system, because I knew that it would have a limited print run. I was right - a month after Riviera came out, I could not see it anywhere. This PSP game gives people who waited too long to try to grab the copy they missed.

Riviera is a game filled with choices. Do I spend time looking for treasure, or do I move on? The time spent on even mundane decisions affects what happens in the game. For the optimist, it gives a feeling of adventure. For the pessimist, it feels like every decision made in the game could have been wrong. I found myself doing every level twice just to see what happened if I changed my decision. The originally didn't appeal to me, but it is an okay anime RPG.
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Platform for Display: Sony PSPVerified Purchase
In 2002, the Sting Entertainment-developed Yakusoku no Chi Riviera saw its release in Japan for the Japanese-exclusive handheld WonderSwan Color. Two years afterward the game saw a port to the Game Boy Advance, and the following year saw its North American release, thanks to Atlus, as Riviera: The Promised Land. The year afterward saw an enhanced port, with full voice acting, to the PlayStation Portable, the remake seeing its release outside Japan in 2007, and providing a solid twist on the typical role-playing game experience in spite of some flaws.

Long ago, Asgard, home of the gods, and Utgard, home of the demons, fought a war, Ragnarok, that brought chaos to the world, with the former suffering gravely, and breaking an ancient taboo, the gods sacrificing their lives to bring black-winged reapers known as Grim Angels into battle, which, through their fierce fighting, successfully terminated the war. The gods sealed away the demons in the heavenly island of Riviera, the gods soon following. A millennium later, signs of the demons’ return are imminent, and the Seven Magi, proxies of the gods, decide to unleash the hidden power within Riviera through the Retribution, with a pair of Grim Angels descending upon the sacred isle…

Riviera is divided into several chapters, most of which commence in the town of Elendia for a few story events, and afterward progress to a dungeon with several floors and rooms, where exploration is rather simplistic, the player able to alternate between movement and exploration modes, where in the latter mode, players can expend TP to trigger story events such as observing part of the scenery or opening a treasure chest. Sometimes, the player, during one of these events, must input a sequence of button presses to disarm a trap or avoid an environmental hazard. Rooms may occasionally have sets of monsters the player must fight to advance the game.

Before battle, the player can choose up to three of five characters to participate in combat in a formation consisting of one character in front row and two in the back row, or two characters in the front row and one in the back row. During character selection, the player can also glimpse the encountered enemies to decide which weapons to bring into battle, which is helpful since most foes have exploitable elemental weaknesses. After confirming the fighting party, the player can select up to four items to bring into battle, each with a limited number of uses within battle except for protagonist Ein’s Einherjar sword, whose use is infinite.

The real fun begins once the player has confirmed their item selection. The player’s characters and the enemy take turns depending upon agility, each having a wait gauge that, once empty, triggers their respective turns. During a character’s turn, the player can choose one of the four items to use against the enemy or on that particular character. Each character has an affinity for certain items, something to consider before battle when setting things up; for instance, if a character is not proficient in use of a certain weapon, they’ll simply “throw” it at the enemy for weaker damage and a high miss rate, but otherwise, the item will normally strike an enemy or have an effect on the user.

As the player and the enemy exchange blows, an overdrive gauge gradually fills up to three levels, and allows characters, if they’ve used certain items a specific number of times (with item mastery coming after battle if a character is still alive), to consume one, two, or three of the levels for a special effect on the party or enemy. Some overdrive skills, such as that which comes with the Einherjar weapon, shatter the overdrive gauge, forbidding overdrive skill use for the battle’s remainder. Overdrive skills are, in some instances, the difference between victory and defeat against tough enemies, specifically story bosses, with the enemy having their own gauge that fills gradually that, when full, will trigger a powerful skill on their part that completely empties their gauge.

Battle ultimately ends in either the player’s favor or the enemies once all members of one side are deceased. Player death results in a Game Over that gives players the opportunity to retry the same battle with items reset to their pre-battle uses, each enemy’s HP partially drained, and the overdrive gauge filled one level. A secondary death results in the same pre-battle setup of item uses, enemy HP drained even more, and the overdrive gauge filled two levels, while a tertiary death does the same with respect to item uses while completely filling the player’s overdrive gauge and reducing antagonist HP to its lowest level, with no health decrease in subsequent attempts.

If the player is victorious, however, characters that have completely filled item skill levels and are still alive will gain a special overdrive skill to use with that item as well as an increase in stats, alongside TP usable within dungeons. The player also receives a ranking based on battle performance and their number of retries, not to mention the occasional item, the game capping the number of weapons and other consumables they can carry at a time, which slightly gives Riviera the feel of a survivor-horror game. Outside story battles, the player can fight “practice” battles in which limited item uses don’t expend (but are still vulnerable to durability-decreasing abilities by slime foes, so avoiding practice fights containing slimes is definitely a recommendation), but skill levels still increase, and given the game’s occasional difficulty spikes, taking time to practice with the player’s items is certainly a must.

So long as the player takes the time to master items, Riviera is not a terribly difficult title, with this reviewer, for instance, barely winning the final boss fight without any retries and one character standing despite dying a few times against a few prior bosses. The game mechanics tend to work well in spite of unskippable ability animations on both sides that tend to drag out fights (there is an option to turn off part of enemy overdrive sequences, but that’s it), alongside the inability in all but perhaps one or two dungeons to back out of a floor to save and fight practice battles, but otherwise, the battle system certainly helps the game more than hurts.

Aside from the slight stinginess of the save system and frequent points of no returns in dungeons, the game interface is okay, with a linear structure that always keeps the player moving in the right direction and in-game maps, although one dungeon-wide puzzle necessitates heavy note-taking, with no in-game preservation of said puzzle’s critical information. In the end, interaction is passable.

The story is perhaps Riviera’s low point, putting quantity above quality, given the frequency of story events that do little to advance the central storyline let alone develop Ein and his fully-feminine party members, although the ending can vary depending upon Ein’s relationships with his comrades, and the translation, in spite of a few errors and oddities such as Lina’s addressing herself in the third person, is more than adequate.

The audio, however, is one of the game’s high points, with plenty of catchy tracks such as a few of the battle themes and beautiful pieces such as the serene song for the town of Elendia. The voice acting is decent, as well, in spite of some squeaky-sounding characters such as the fairies and Lina, not to mention occasional audio glitches, but otherwise, Riviera is fairly easy on the ears.

The visuals, though, could have used some polish, with the character sprites showing little emotion, their character designs doing most of the work in this regard, and the game heavily recycling dungeon room visuals, featuring palette-swapped enemies, and battle animations consisting of the player’s characters and enemies telekinetically using their abilities against one another without actual physical contact. The static anime scenes are the high point of the graphics, which are otherwise lackluster.

Finally, the game isn’t terribly lengthy, taking somewhere from fifteen to twenty-five hours to complete, with few sidequests although good replayability in the form of the aforementioned multiple endings.

Overall, Riviera: The Promised Land was in its time a decent start to Sting’s Dept. Heaven series, what with its strategic combat system that, while slightly sluggish in execution, is largely solid, alongside great aurals. Its other aspects, however, leave some room for improvement, what with its countless points of no return, slightly-stingy save system, weak storyline, and lackluster visual presentation. Despite these shortcomings, the development of further installments of the Dept. Heaven franchise, not to mention the number of ports for the game, indicate a solid legacy for the series’ first installment.
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Platform for Display: Sony PSP
The Good: Voices, mini-games mix up gameplay, lengthy story, easy to use battle system, being able to re-direct your path is great, interesting story

The Bad: Voices can be grating and irritating after awhile, music isn't anything memorable, not being able to move and level up in typical RPG fashion may turn most off, 2D sprite graphics makes the game feel really old, difficulty is widely unbalanced

Who would have known Atlus would be the one to finally answer gamers cries? I was really skeptical about this when I first played. I expected the typical JRPG setup but I was very wrong. This game feels tailored just for the PSP and portability.

This isn't your average portable RPG though there are some very unique elements that make Riviera different from all the others. Of course this doesn't impress graphically it's your usual isometric sprite RPG but what this DOES have is voices! Yes voices everywhere not just in cut scenes or key moments. Of course the voices aren't top quality but they fit the characters and are charming. Another great feat here is being able to change your path and the outcome of everything. Instead of moving around and hitting random battles you move from screen to screen (YES NO loading anywhere!) then you can change to look mode which will highlight things in that screen such as items, treasure chests, people, key items you name it.

Now let's say you open a chest and there could be a trap in it. This activates a timed button pressing mini game and these mini games are for A LOT of things. You can also look at a certain item and activate demons, or you will make the ground crumble and in turn makes your path different. This game gameplay wise provides well. You're probably asking how you level up? Well buy aquiring new weapons you can gain experience (one point every time you use it) and when you do you earn an over drive skill which will level you up. The over drive meter lets you unleash powerful attacks according to your skill level which is one, two, three, and excelled. Excelled shatters the bar and you can no longer perform over drives but it's very devastating.

You level up by training anytime in the game but what's great here is any items you use are "dummy" items and you don't really use them. The story is pretty good as well you have to save Riviera from the Accursed which are unleashing demons throughout the land...simple but interesting. There's so many details here it's insane just play the game and find out yourself!
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on April 2, 2013
Platform for Display: Sony PSPVerified Purchase
I loved the Gamboy version but the PSP version was even better. You can hear the characters voice acting during cut scenes, and when they use their Over Limit skills. The turn-based combat is excellent, the characters all had their own personalities and the bosses were a challenge to beat. I do enjoy a RPG that gives me a good challenge. I just wish there was a Ps3 version of the game of a sequel to it.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on February 1, 2008
Platform for Display: Sony PSP
A while ago, my friend told me to try this game. Well, now I've tried it (well, the PSP version, not the GBA!) and I am VERY impressed with it. The leveling system and the overall game is very different from traditional RPGs, so enjoy this unique and awesome game!
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on October 26, 2014
Platform for Display: Sony PSP
all good
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on February 9, 2015
Platform for Display: Sony PSPVerified Purchase
Great
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