Road Food

October 14, 2008 | Format: MP3

$8.91
Song Title
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2:40
30
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4:54
30
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2:23
30
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2:20
30
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5:27
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4:16
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3:18
30
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3:39
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9
7:15
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 14, 2008
  • Release Date: October 14, 2008
  • Label: RCA/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 36:12
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001HDYFCS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #96,577 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
62%
4 star
33%
3 star
0%
2 star
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1 star
5%
See all 21 customer reviews
His voice is an instrument!
Steven L. Benaszeski
Again, there are informative liner notes which help to make this an essential purchase.
Michael A. Despeghel
Go ahead....get these, if you are a true GW fan and enjoy.
R. M. Silkey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Michael A. Despeghel on August 15, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This was my introduction to The Guess Who and it's my absolute favorite GW album. As with #10, I compared this new cd to the old Canada cd, as well as the 2-fer disc from 2004. This new reissue of Road Food sounds great. The louder it is played, the better it sounds. Again, there are informative liner notes which help to make this an essential purchase. The bonus tracks are very interesting. First up, there's a remix of Sona Sona without the 1988 overdubs, which makes for an interesting listen. It's mixed quite well. And then there's a run-through of One Way Road To Hell. This song is clearly a run-though, as Burton's voice sounds rough. But it's nice to hear the song in an embryonic state. After the track ends, there's some blank space and then a hidden track with 1:22 left...it's a nice piano/bass/drums juzz-style shuffle and just Burton, Gary and Bill fooling around. It was a pleasant surprise to hear that hidden track.

This new reissue blows the doors off of the 2004 2-fer disc, so please avoid that piece of junk. This new Iconoclassic cd is the best way to own a copy of "Road Food". The cd sounds full and dynamic. Run, don't walk and sang this disc. Here's to hoping Iconoclassic reissues more Guess Who product in the future.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R.J. on December 26, 2004
Format: Audio CD
It's hard to quibble with these Guess Who CD releases. Road Food and Power In the Music are two of their later releases, featuring some excellent tracks such as "Road Food", "Clap For The Wolfman", "Star Baby" and "When The Band Was Singing Shakin' All Over". The real value lies in the album tracks, in which there are some excellent finds for the uninitiated. Both these albums were either unavailable or impossible to find in CD version before, so it's great to see these come out. Next up, when are they ever going to release the lost album "The Way They Were" on CD?
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By The Green Man on August 20, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Yes, what you may have read about the sound quality of the 4 two-albums-on-one-CD reissues of Guess Who RCA-era albums is true. The sound is not quite up to the standard of original CD reissues. But, you can compensate fairly well with a graphic equalizer or bass and treble controls on your stereo system. (Of course, you probably can't do much about the sound when playing on a portable CD player these days, since some marketing genius decided that bass-boost was the only tone control that anyone needs anymore.) But what about the actual muusic offered here? Well, the first album is "Road Food," the band's suprise comeback hit of 1974. I still find that it is simply the best album they ever did. Every song is quality material. This reissue returns the songs to their original LP sequence, which is something of a plus. (For some reason, the original reissue put the LP side 2 songs first, just as the cassette version did. I suppose that was to draw attention to the top 10 hit "Clap for the Wolfman.") Though the material here is mostly about their adventures as an endlessly touring band, the lyrics are light years ahead of the usual "the road is hell" stuff written for previous albums. This is a band having a good time, and the music reflects it. "Straighten Out" and "Don't You Want Me" (an improvement over the original from "Rockin'") are flat-out joyus fun. You wish that you could be there while it's being committed to tape. If you can't find a copy of the original "Road Food" used somewhere, this is the next best thing. 5 stars for "Road Food." The second LP is their final RCA offering, "Power in the Music." This time the band seems to be getting too pretentious for its own good.Read more ›
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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Steve Marshall on May 17, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The pairing of these albums has nothing to do with each other aside from the fact that they would fit on a single disc. Most of the tracks on Road Food lack bass, and all of them suffer from too much compression. Burton Cummings' lead vocals are mixed too low on "Attila's Blues" and "Don't You Want Me." "One Way Road to Hell" fades out early. "Pleasin' for Reason" and the title track have too much bass, and the latter fades out slightly early.
Power in the Music doesn't fare any better. The entire album (especially the first half) is compressed. The high end is boosted a bit on "Down and Out Woman." The end vocals on "Dreams" are buried in the mix, and Bill Wallace's intricate bass work is now lost in the mix. Cummings' spoken word parts in "Rich World, Poor World" are buried as well. One of the worst jobs on any of the tracks is on "Rosanne," when the intro is actually faded in. The title track (which is incorrectly listed as "Shopping Bag Lady" in the lyrics) has dropouts at 6:12 and 6:21 into the song.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Delaronde on August 28, 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Hats off to Iconoclassic for their great work putting together this Guess Who reissue series. Every one so far (and I have 'em all) seems like it was a labor of love and, as a fan, what more can one ask? Each album is worth it for the liner notes alone, which offer an overview of the state of the band at the time of the recording, and descriptions and comments for every track from the band members themselves. Sweet.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By B. E Jackson on December 22, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Road Food is a surprise to me. Not just because it's been neglected over the years, and not just because it's actually good, but I'm mainly referring to the way it *sounds*. Cleaner production. MUCH cleaner. Not a problem though. In addition to that obvious aspect, I also notice more experimenting (a bonus there- I thought these guys were washed up by now- I was wrong) and a slightly different feel to the songwriting... this is a very different album compared to the period of Canned Wheat through #10 (in my opinion, at least).

"Ballad of the Last Five Years" reminds me quite a bit of the Van Morrison classic "Cyprus Avenue" from his classic Astral Weeks album. In this songs particular case, the orchestra really gives it some flavor and adds to the already pretty awesome vocal melody (sung in typically sincere Burton Cummings style, of course!). This is quite a fantastic song regardless of any similarities. It also seems to indicate an update is sound and production. Hey, it was going to happen anyway- *all* bands updated their sound as the years rolled forward back in the 70's. Sometimes it was for the worse (Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin anyone?) but in the case of the Guess Who, it's fine either way.

"Attila's Blues" is a pretty catchy, vocal melody-driven blues rocker. There's a brief guitar solo but the song never advances (nor *needs* to advance, might I add) past that really solid vocal melody. There's actually a surprising amount of carefully implemented vocal melody tricks so it never resorts to simplicity- it's definitely a well-constructed song. I'm giving the band a compliment here for going the extra mile to make it even better. "One Way Road to Hell" is a frightening song title! The piano in the beginning sounds ideal for a horror flick!
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