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Road Hogs: Detroit's Big, Beautiful Luxury Performance Cars of the 1960s and 1970s Hardcover – June 13, 2011


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Road Hogs: Detroit's Big, Beautiful Luxury Performance Cars of the 1960s and 1970s + American Station Wagons: The Golden Era 1950-1975 (Those were the days...)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Motorbooks; First edition (June 13, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0760337640
  • ISBN-13: 978-0760337646
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 9.5 x 11.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #259,975 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Library Journal November 15, 2011

This tribute to the wretched automotive excesses of the 1960s and 1970s takes an affectionate look at the land yachts and whale-sized station wagons then produced by Detroit automakers. Every page contains full-color photos—many from ads and sales brochures—showing Cadillacs, Oldsmobiles, and Lincolns of the era. Automotive journalist Peters (Automotive Atrocities) delivers an amusing and somewhat snarky narrative, pausing to snicker over the behemoths of the highways while sharing stories with readers. With fins galore and enough chrome to blind oncoming drivers, these massive luxury cruisers featured sumptuous interiors with Tiffany clocks and fine Corinthian leather. With gas under a dollar a gallon and no worries about global warming, who cared whether the miles-per-gallon hovered around ten? These were the vehicles of Elvis and Frank Sinatra, a dream for the average worker bee. VERDICT A must-have for fans of big Detroit iron, and a fun choice to bring to family gatherings—“Didn’t grandpa have one of those?” A guaranteed conversation starter among baby boomers, especially those who learned how to parallel park in one of these mile-long cruisers.—Susan Belsky, Oshkosh P.L., WI



"A guaranteed conversation starter among baby boomers, especially
those who learned how to parallel park in one of these mile-long
cruisers." — Library Journal



This tribute to the wretched automotive excesses of the 1960s and 1970s takes an affectionate look at the land yachts and whale-sized station wagons then produced by Detroit automakers. Every page contains full-color photos—many from ads and sales brochures—showing Cadillacs, Oldsmobiles, and Lincolns of the era. Automotive journalist Peters (Automotive Atrocities) delivers an amusing and somewhat snarky narrative, pausing to snicker over the behemoths of the highways while sharing stories with readers. With fins galore and enough chrome to blind oncoming drivers, these massive luxury cruisers featured sumptuous interiors with Tiffany clocks and fine Corinthian leather. With gas under a dollar a gallon and no worries about global warming, who cared whether the miles-per-gallon hovered around ten? These were the vehicles of Elvis and Frank Sinatra, a dream for the average worker bee. VERDICT A must-have for fans of big Detroit iron, and a fun choice to bring to family gatherings—“Didn’t grandpa have one of those?” A guaranteed conversation starter among baby boomers, especially those who learned how to parallel park in one of these mile-long cruisers. - Library Journal Xpress

From the Inside Flap

 

Think back to the awe-inspiring automobiles you saw on the street when you were a kid, the sleek Chryslers and luxurious Oldsmobiles, the elegant Cadillacs and opulent Lincolns, big cars with giant engines that ruled the road. Road Hogs: Detroit’s Big, Beautiful Luxury Performance Cars of the 1960s and 1970s celebrates these cars, as well as the era they represent, a time when American automobiles were, without question, the best the world had to offer. This was a time when “made in America” meant “quality,” a time when the entire world aspired to own the cars rolling out of Detroit. Lavishly illustrated, this book will transport the reader back to a time when luxury, power, and style ruled the road.

 


More About the Author

Eric Peters has been writing about cars for the past 20 years; he is the author of "Automotive Atrocities" (2004) and "Road Hogs" (spring 2011), a former editorial writer/columnist for The Washington Times, a contributor to Cars.Com, The CarConnection.com and AOL Autos, among others. He has written for the Detroit News and Free Press, the Chicago Tribune, Investors Business Daily and National review. He currently lives with his wife in rural SW Virginia, where the traffic is light and the cops are few. Visit www.epautos.com for more, including write-ups of the latest cars and trucks, rants about politics and lots of other stuff, too.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Forrestcars on July 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A fun book with great pictures, but one that in fact spans the 50's well into the 80's (not focused on 60's and 70's), and unfortunately has a lot of factual "mis-cues" and innacurate information (a picture of a 58 Impala mis-identified as a Buick Electra, for example). Still, worth having in your auto library if you are a car nut...just grin and bear it when you see some of the glaring errors!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By LZO on July 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I don't know where to start on this poorly written and researched book, there are endless factual errors and completely incorrect statements, the copy seems intentionally vague to hide the authors poor grasp of his subject. I would recommend just looking at the pictures and ignore the pathetic commentary. The most classic mistake is a photo of a 1958 Chevrolet captioned as an Electra 225, perhaps in an effort to disguise the mistake the logo on the hood has been airbrushed out. All in all not a very special effort, half of the book comes from reprinting period ads and dealer literature. A number of the contemporary shots appear to be incorrectly painted and accessorized European sourced photos of vehicles in poor condition. Good book for someone who knows nothing about cars and wishes to learn nothing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michigan Reviewer on October 26, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book is a must read for anyone who had the privilege of ever having owned or driven these land yachts. I cut my teeth on a 70 Chrysler Newport Custom, so this book was right up my alley. Sorry for that pun. The author writes and describes these behemoths with tongue firmly planted in cheek. Those who grow up today will probably never understand the corporate or consumer mindset of the 1950s to early 1970s. For them this book might seem about as relevant as a walk on the moon. Nostalgia for what many opine as the "good old days" before global warming and OPEC oil embargoes can be revisited by thumbing through this tome. I know I was able to relive some memories by reading this book. As many say, you know you're old when the car you learned to drive in is considered an antique. Probably a niche book for a niche audience, but is it ever fun if you fit into that niche. Those with an interest in vintage American gas guzzling iron will love it. Those who drive Priuses or Volts, probably will not. I'll bet Bob Lutz would like it! I just wish MotorBooks would print their books here. The Chinese proofreaders miss a whole lot of mistakes.
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Format: Hardcover
Road Hogs: Detroit's Big,Beautiful Luxury Performance of the 1960's and 1970's. Not Politically Correct And I Love it! Although there is one part where the author jokes about George W Bush's Grammar or lack there of and another quip about Having A 427 Corvette or being an owner of one you won't enjoy as much as one of these Big Beasts(I Disagree with that as well,Being A Huge Corvette Fan.)Other than that,Mr.Peters wrote and put together a great book full of funny bits not about the Big Cars but on how puny modern Small cars and how Sissified Cars have become, using terms such as "SafetyN a z i s",These Bad Berthas and Behemoths are rolling pieces of Art,Although being a Child of the 80's I do recall experiencing/seeing some,My Aunt Had a Lincoln Continental,Black 2 Door with an Opera Window that was stolen.You have Cars in Here like The Pontiac GrandVille,(No Grand Prix though sadly which were big my dad had one a Big Block),Safari Wagon/Grand Safari/LeMans Safari, Ford LTD,Galaxie 500/XL/LTD Convertible(like The Omega Man Car)Country Squire Wagon(Remember The Family Truckster from National Lampoon?)Pontiac Catalina(My Uncle and Grandpa had several)Cadillac Eldorado,Coupe deVille,Sedan deVille,Fleetwood Sixty or 75 Limo,Chrysler Imperial/Imperial and Chrysler New Yorker,Cordoba and a nice 79' Cordoba 300,Buick Estate Wagon(No Century covered?)
Chevy Monte Carlo(again No Pontiac Grand Prix?)Buick Electra 225,Chevy Impala/Caprice(sadly the "Urban Crowd" here in Miami jacks them up on 26-30' Wheels call em' Donks,the opposite of a lowrider- hideous),Amc Matador(remember James Bond Movie the Man with the Golden Gun?
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Format: Hardcover
In this full-color hardcover volume, Eric Peters chronicles the history, and demise, of those 9 miles-per-gallon, two-and-a-half ton, 350 horsepower, nineteen-feet long, solid steel & chrome behemoths that us "real" car guys all loved...then, and, now. It was a book that needed to be written to remind those of us who "were there" of what we went through, and what we miss. And, for future generations of Automotive Historians to use as a textbook for learning about what they really missed: a time when "Made In America" was a given for the cars we drove, and Detroit was "The Motor City".

If you ever owned a Catalina, an Electra 225, a Coupe deVille, a Galaxie 500, a Continental, an Impala, or, an Ambassador 990, you're covered. The "...Things To Know" sidebar in every section also lists some special info on the models you just read about..and that's cool.

FINALLY, I'LL JUST SAY: This is a well thought out book, written in an easy-to-read, tongue-in-cheek manner, that's honest & true. It brings back a time and place in American History that will never be again. A time when those huge battering-ram-solid 4-wheeled conveyances, with bumpers that weighed more than a new Toyota, were seen everywhere and carried the passengers within them safely, swiftly, powerfully, and cushioned them in the comfort of seats that were comparable to their own living room couches...a time that many of us would go back to in a heartbeat.
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