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Road to Nowhere (Blu-ray)

41 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

There s a murky tenuous balance between reality and fiction; particularly when it involves a beautiful young woman, murder, a powerful politico, a missing fortune and suicide.

A passionate filmmaker, creating a film based upon a true crime, casts an unknown mysterious young woman bearing a disturbing resemblance to the femme fatale in the story. He finds himself unsuspectingly drawn into a complex web of haunting intrigue, obsessed with the woman, the crime, her possibly notorious past and the disturbing complexity between art and truth.

From the Smoky Mountains of North Carolina to Verona, Rome and London, new truths are revealed and clues to other crimes and passions, darker and even more complex are uncovered.

Review

A certifiable masterpiece…. sculpted with light and movement, bodies and sounds, Hellman goes for the essence: hurt and doubt. --Film Comment

Road to Nowhere may also be as significant to the indie feature as Avatar is to the popcorn movie. --The New York Times

Monte Hellman s first feature film in 21 years is one of his finest and deepest, a twin peak to his 1971 masterpiece Two Lane Blacktop. --Variety

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: John Diehl, Waylon Payne, Shannyn Sossamon, Dominique Swain, Tygh Runyan
  • Directors: Monte Hellman
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, NTSC, Surround Sound, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: MONTEREY VIDEO
  • DVD Release Date: August 23, 2011
  • Run Time: 122 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0051J160I
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #132,971 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By G. Teslovich on December 3, 2011
Format: DVD
Is it a one or a five? Usually a five comes about because of creative writing; directing that has a flow that is engaging; acting as natural as breathing; props and sets that capture you into the world of the story; cinematography that has a wow factor and finally attention to detail is always present in greatness.

So, sorry, "Road to Nowhere" was a road to nowhere. The story lacked clarity and believability; it was too fragmented and jumped so much that nausea was beginning to set in; acting had a robotic read-a-line artificiality with an overly staged feel to it; filming largely took place in a few cost saving settings - house, park and roadway; low quality audio and no subtitles made it hard to follow along with the story; there's an inverse relationship between the number of acknowledgements and thank you for assistance credits and the quality of a movie. In this case around 130 such special thanks e.g. Joe's Pizza for the doughnuts, Mike's Hardware for the water, Dr. Dentist for use of his storeroom with patient's folders, etc.

Suggestion: Watch "Le Quattro Volte" and compare writing, directing, acting, cinematography yourself.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tony Sac on March 26, 2012
Format: DVD
it's a b-movie about a low budget movie within a waste of two hours. I found the reviews trying to explain and praise this movie more entertaining than the film itself. Shannyn Sossamon's talent is wasted once again on inferior material and i'm sorry to say that whatever promise Dominique Swain showed is now merely a waste. The one star is for the Tom Russell songs. On a side note it seems that the word masterpiece, in describing motion pictures, is being overused and undervalued. Keep Watching.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Doug Anderson VINE VOICE on March 14, 2013
Format: DVD
Pretty much everything that critics (amateur and professional) have said about this movie is true, both the positive and the negative. And yet....this is one of those failures/successes (like The Paperboy) that you do not want to miss. Monte Hellman made a masterpiece back in 1971 called Two-Lane Blacktop which starred two non-actors (James Taylor and Dennis Wilson), and that film established Hellman as one of the most interesting filmmakers of the early 70's but his entire reputation rests on that one effort. He made other films but none received much attention, until Road to Nowhere, a film which many see as a return to form. Be that as it may, this film stands on its own. It doesn't need the Hellman or Two-Lane mythos to seduce you. Its got plenty of seductive power of its own.

In a way, Road to Nowhere is a chance for Hellman (or any cinephile in the audience) to examine his or her own relationship to cinema. On the one hand, the film is full of references to favorite films (The Lady Eve, The Seventh Seal, Spirit of the Beehive) and can be read as an homage to cinema and to a life spent in the company of grand illusions and magnificent obsessions, but it can also be read as a deconstruction of the grand illusions and magnificent obessions that drive people to make or spend their lives around art. Formally, the film resembles Altman's The Player in that Road to Nowhere is a story of an industry type who gets caught up in a real-world film noir. But tonally and thematically the film is a closer cousin to Hitchcock's Vertigo and an even closer cousin to David Lynch's Twin Peaks and Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive...films in which players try out alternative identities/realities and live in a kind of nowhere somewhere between fact and fiction.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert Beveridge HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 3, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video
Road to Nowhere (Monte Hellman, 2010)

Like everyone else, I knew the name Monte Hellman thanks to his cult favorite Two-Lane Blacktop (which stars a young James Taylor, of all people); I had no idea he was still making movies until a few years ago, at which point I set out to try and track a few down. Netflix Instant Streaming was my friend, first pointing me to the anthology flick Trapped Ashes, of which Hellman's entry is the best by a country mile, and then to this wonderful little talk-piece-[censored for Amazon consumption]-slow-thriller, the kind of avant-garde nightmare that tends to make fans of more accessible thrillers cringe (thus, I would assume, its low ratings at the usual suspects; 5.5 at IMDB, 38% public on Rotten Tomatoes—but, as I am fond of noting when I see it, the gulf between the public and the critical receptions to this movie is massive. The critical rating at RT: 79%). I'll add to the gap: I think it's [censored for Amazon consumption] brilliant, though I have to agree with Roger Ebert's pithy quote that the film “plays like an exercise in frustrating audiences.” This is a thriller for Apichatpong Weerasethakul fans, at least if I am any yardstick to judge by.

Steven [do I REALLY have to not include the name of the scriptwriter, geniuses? You need a better "obscenity" filter] (All Men Are Mortal)' script is an ensemble piece masquerading as a straightforward thriller. The surface plot: a hot young filmmaker, Mitchell Haven (Snakes on a Plane's Tygh Runyan), heads into the backwoods of the deep south to make a movie based on a local unsolved mystery.
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Road to Nowhere (Blu-ray)
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