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Comment: 1961 Hardcover [1st ed.] . 341 p. Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
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The Road Past Mandalay Hardcover – Import, 1961


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Harper and Brothers; First Edition edition (1961)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0718103211
  • ISBN-13: 978-0718103217
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.8 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #807,065 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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He spent much time there and know much of its history.
Mr. Herman K. Sarkisian
This book appealed to me as a fascinating piece of history, & great , true life adventure tale.
Blue Ridge Runner
An excellent military memoir, a must read also if you're interested in India.
whistler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Michael Short on August 11, 2005
Format: Paperback
John Master's second volume in his autobiography details his time during WWII as a British officer in the Indian Army. Masters--an eloquent writer with keen insight--spent most of the war as a staff officer, with time in command of one of the Chindit Brigades. Masters provides details on what it takes to be a staff officer, but also to command high-quality troops under extremely difficult conditions. Pay particular attention to the part of the book where Masters writes about ordering the mercy killing of several of his troops. Masters was forced to make a horrifically difficult decision, and would have to live with it for the rest of his life.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Richard J. White on June 2, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The second book of author John Master's autobiography, The Road Past Mandalay covers Master's service with the old Indian Army during World War 2.
The book begins with Masters as a young adjutant in a Gurkha regiment and ends with him a much-promoted divisional chief of staff. In between, Masters serves in Persia, attends staff college, falls in love ,has a child, gets married, operates behind enemy lines in Burma,and participates in the liberation of Burma from the Japanese.
All of the book is well written and insightful. Some of the book is extremely grim , (as when Masters orders his most severely wounded men to be shot rather than left for the Japanese). This is not a valentine to India and to his beloved Gurkhas, as is Master's prior "Bugles and a Tiger". Instead , it is a superb war memoir of an articulate mid-level officer who saw his share of triumph and suffering. A first-class work.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jersey Kid on October 15, 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In the second of what became a three volume autobiography, John Masters describes his combat experience during the Second World War. This story, a superb and well written narrative is unlike most popular memoirs - be they military, political, social or whatever - in that it is not about the notional a 'mover and shaker.'

Masters was a mid-level (i.e. infantry brigade) staff officer who has been formally trained in the role. This being the case, he understood the needs and requirements that were behind the orders. Becasue of this, thestory is imbibed with a rich layer of detail related to the behind the scense aspects of warfare. Field-grade officers plan battles; people like Masters made them happen.

Masters was also never involved in what I call 'name battles.' His unit fought in the desert but not the El Alamein/Tunisia desert. Instead, they invaded Iraq - by way of Basra - to depose a fascist regime. From there, via the Staff College in Quetta, India (now Pakistan), he joined Wingate's Chindits with the Forgotten Fourteenth Army in Burma.

Another favorable point is that this book is written without a ghost-writer; something fitting of a man who would go on to be a screenwriter. There is a candor and emotional honesty in what is described...even when it is at his own cost. Of course, you are still left with one man's view of himself and his experiences. It's possible that another story might be told by the soon-to-be-divorced husband of the love of his life or by those he attacks in relation to events behind Japanese lines. I urge you to discount such thoughts and enjoy a story which could only be made better if iu were related in person.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Chris Robbins on September 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a captivating and superbly written World War II chronicle that tells a remarkable story of how well trained soldiers from countries/cultures throughout the British Empire learned to work together as a tight knit team and fought under extreme conditions to defeat a ruthless enemy. One dimension of this book is about the intricacies and nature of leadership and how one leads to motivate individuals and organizations to do the impossible and win. These same skills can be applied to today's war time challenges and corporate global competitiion.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Blue Ridge Runner on August 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book appealed to me as a fascinating piece of history, & great , true life adventure tale. Speaking as a former student & teacher, I found American schools turn students OFF to history. In contrast, I have found John Masters
turns people ON.

I first became acquainted with John Masters via his three historical novels, set in India during British rule. Enthralled with the first one to come my way --- [ "The Deceivers" - based on the the very real problem the British had rooting out the "Thugs". Yeah, folks, Indiana Jones & "The Temple of Doom" was based upon "Gunga Din" --- & both were based upon these very real cultic robbers & assassins. ---SCARED ME SILLY !!! ] --- I found it difficult to find the other two novels.
[Thanks to Amazon & perseverance, I finally did. ] Then came the author's partial autobiography -- "Bugles & a Tiger" -- describing his life as a young British officer in India, choosing to lead Gurkha infantry. It was only recently that I came upon the continuation of his story --- namely his service in the Middle East & Burma during WW!!

It was having read these four books that caused me to snatch up this final one, as soon as I came across it on Amazon.
It came to me from the UK.
I find it is not as well written as his other books. [ Which I rate EXCELLENT!] Yet, it intrigues me, filling in a piece of the great void of history left by our grossly inadequate educational system. Our current involvement in places such as Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan are very much repetitions of the British experiences -- i.e.: history repeating itself. Masters' writings really bring home the fact that what is happening now is grounded upon what has gone before.
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