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The Road to Yesterday (L.M. Montgomery Books) Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1993


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 800L (What's this?)
  • Series: L.M. Montgomery Books
  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Laurel Leaf (January 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553560689
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553560688
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #340,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

For Anne and Gilbert Blythe, life in a small village is never dull because of all the entertaining gossip, and what strange and funny tales they hear: about the mischievous twins whose dearest wish comes true when they meet up with a bored and haunted millionaire; or clever Penelope Craig, who considers herself an expert on children -- until she adopts a boy of her own; or Timothy Randebush, a man so eager to keep his brother out of the clutches of a dangerous woman that he spirits her away -- only to fall prey to her charms himself. Filled with unexpected surprises, laughter, and tears, here are fourteen of the Blythes' favorite tales.

From the Inside Flap

For Anne and Gilbert Blythe, life in a small village is never dull because of all the entertaining gossip, and what strange and funny tales they hear: about the mischievous twins whose dearest wish comes true when they meet up with a bored and haunted millionaire; or clever Penelope Craig, who considers herself an expert on children -- until she adopts a boy of her own; or Timothy Randebush, a man so eager to keep his brother out of the clutches of a dangerous woman that he spirits her away -- only to fall prey to her charms himself. Filled with unexpected surprises, laughter, and tears, here are fourteen of the Blythes' favorite tales.

More About the Author

Lucy Maude Montgomery (1874-1942) was born on Prince Edward Island, Canada, the setting for Anne of Green Gables. She left to attend college, but returned to Prince Edward Island to teach. In 1911, she married the Reverend Ewan MacDonald. Anne of Green Gables, the first in a series of "Anne" books by Montgomery, was published in 1908 to immediate success and continues to be a perennial favorite.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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That story alone is worth buying the book.
"garydebweb"
The stories are sweet but a little frustrating because they feel like they should tie the comunity and characters together somehow but they dont.
A. D. Carroll
I read and re-read this book throughout my teenage years.
CarrieTown

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 73 people found the following review helpful By K. A. Bruce on January 8, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Road to Yesterday was the last collection of tales that L.M.Montgomery wrote before she died. Her son, Stuart McDonald, found the manuscript among her papers, and had it published post-humously. Originally, Montgomery had called the work The Blythes Are Quoted, and had framed the tales with accounts of the Blythes at home listening to their favorite stories. This frame-narrative was removed, and the stories were rearranged into their current order.

In many ways, The Road to Yesterday displays both the strengths and the weaknesses of Montgomery's work. It shows her genuine ability to tell stories of the community in the voice of the community. Her narrative voice is that of the neighborhood gossip, who doesn't wish ill on her neighbours but who delights nonetheless in their poor decisions, their misfortunes and their downfalls as an interesting tale. It also shows her command of irony and satire, two qualities with which she is seldom credited. At the same time, though, it reveals how she could never quite break away from the narrative patterns of magazine literature with its improbable coincidences and inevitable happy endings. Most of the stories revolved around love and romance, and tend to be rather implausibly constructed. For instance, "Fool's Errand" tells of a man who becomes lonely after his mother dies and remembers a promise he made long ago to a young girl to return and marry her, while "The Pot and the Kettle" is the tale of a young woman who has to marry a certain man to gain an inheritance and who refuses to do so, only to fall in love with him when he courts her by another name.

Only two stories in the collection are genuinely startling and unconventional. "A Commonplace Woman" is striking in its refusal to conform to generally-accepted standards of morality.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By "garydebweb" on April 1, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
While this is not my most favorite of LMM's short story collections, it does have very good stories. It offers a few extra tidbits about the Blythes, although I agree with others, that it seems a bit forced at times. However, I want to make a point of saying that this book includes what I think may be LMM's most powerful short story: A Commonplace Woman. That story alone is worth buying the book. It is an incredible tale of the life of one woman, who everyone thinks is simply an old boring woman, who never did anything of interest in her life. As she lies in a bed upstairs dying, her relatives sit around downstairs waiting for her to die and talking about how boring her life was. Meanwhile, the woman, Ursula, is remembering her life and the one secret that made her and her life extremely rewarding and interesting, and if anyone had known of it, they would change their opinion of her in a hurry. I don't want to give away what the secret is, but, believe me, it's a wonderful story, easily the most beautiful, sad, thought-provoking and rich of LMM's short stories, once you get past the somewhat long- winded beginning! Besides this one, I highly recommend all of Lucy Montgomery's books, they are all excellent. I re-read most of mine very year!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 3, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Road to Yesterday contains many many wonderful stories about Glen St. Mary, where Anne and Gilbert and their children live. It gives a bit of insight into the Blythe family from the townspeople, as well as a few tidbits as to what became of the Blythe children (and even a little bit about the grandchildren) after the book Rilla of Ingleside. This is a wonderful book.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 16, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a Lucy Maud Montgomery fan I loved this book. It showcases her amazing ability to make a character live and breath...even across 70 years. The only thing I did not like was the almost forced inclusion of the Blythe family. I bought this book BECAUSE it had further references to beloved Anne, however the insertion of a Blythe into every story was a bit of a drawback at times because the stories were not about the Blythes and just gave enough information to make you wish they were. Over all I would definately reccomend this to any reader who enjoys classic tales about human nature in all of its derivations. And after all, who ever wants to let go of Anne-with-an-e.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 6, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Road To Yesterday is my favourite of Lucy Montgomery's collection of stories. It makes you want to live vicariously through the experiences of the characters. What is also lovely is that you read more about Anne's descendents and more about her as well. I cannot count the amount of times I have reread this book. You will not regret your purchase.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By kat on September 27, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I gave up reading the Montgomery short story collections (e.g. Akin to Anne) after a while because they were obviously written simply to make money and had little or no literary merit or originality. They were not intended to be published in book form anyway. However 'The Road to Yesterday' was. The stories are well up to Montgomery's standard and are very varied - some romantic, some sad - but all very good. Especially worthy of mention is 'Here Comes the Bride' which very cleverly builds up a story from many different viewpoints. 'Penelope Struts her Theories' has to be read just because of the title.

As another reviewer has noted, the inclusion of the Blythes into every story does seem somewhat forced in parts, but provides a common link which truns the book more into a book rather than just a random selection of stories.
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