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Roadfood: Revised Edition Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Broadway; Revised edition (April 12, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0767922646
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767922647
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.2 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,268,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"America's leading authorities on the culinary delights to be found while driving"
-- Newsweek magazine

About the Author

JANE and MICHAEL STERN are the authors of more than thirty books about America. Their “Roadfood” column for Gourmet has won three James Beard awards, and their interactive website, www.roadfood.com, has been named as a Top Site by PC Magazine and has been named Best of the Web by Forbes.com. They contribute a weekly “Two for the Road” segment to Public Radio’s “The Splendid Table” and frequent reviews to The New York Times Book Review. When not eating their way around the country, the Sterns live in West Redding, Connecticut.

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Customer Reviews

I had to run out and find myself something good to eat after just a few pages.
D. Roth
As an example seems strange that several restaurants are listed for Key West but few other places in Florida.
R. Beaton
Whenever we travel, we consult Jane and Michael Stern's excellent "Road Food" a guide to some great eats.
Three Guys from Miami

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

181 of 202 people found the following review helpful By Jeanette L. Skwor on August 10, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just bought this book and am really disappointed. I had expected something like the reviewers said, "a bible for motorists", "dining options along America's highways and back roads", "regional maps", etc. I checked out Wisconsin first, because that's where I live and what I know best. 18 places reviewed and 10 of them are in Milwaukee, with 3 more in the 'burbs. 2 in Green Bay, neither of which I would put in a book on great food - 'tis true, Krolls is good, but it's the East side Krolls (different owners, vastly better food), not the West side one, although of course with the West side, you do get to mention Lambeau Field, Green Bay's Mecca.

Racine, Sheboygan and Manitowoc get the other state listings. Recap: 18 in Wisconsin, 13 of which are in Milwaukee. Two of the places virtually every Wisconsinite will cite as great food options are Madison and Door County, neither of which get a mention.

OK, maybe I'm being too hard on the authors. Maybe I should forget about the ethnic smorgasbord in Madison and all the tasty home made ice creams and other places in Door County and just admit Milwaukee has all the great road food - but see folks, the problem is, I wasn't expecting listings like Watts Tea Room or Karl Ratzsch's ($79 Porterhouse for 2). Guess my roadfood budget is different than others roadfood budget.

So get over Wisconsin. How about Illinois? 24 listings, guess where 18 are? Yup, Chicago. So if you didn't fill up, or shoot your budget in Milwaukee, just drive south an hour or so, and cruise the highways and backroads of the Windy City.

Hey, get out of the Midwest. Let's go South. How about Kentucky? I'm fairly familiar with that state, mmm, not a lot of good food in Kentucky apparently, only 5 listings.
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51 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Nancy H on June 23, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
We recently purchased the new edition of 'Roadfood' to take along with us on our recent road trip through the Southwest. In the course of the trip, we tried three places recommended in this guide. The first, the Nevada Dinner House, had been acquired by new owners and our dinners bore little resemblance to those described in the guide. The second meal, at Pasqual's in New Mexico, was excellent. Unfortunately, the total bill was not the $30-40 predicted by the guide, but rather $100 dollars for three diners (including tip). We ordered no alcohol, shared a dessert, and one of the diners was a child. Our final shot with the guide, at Old Smokey's Diner in Arizona was also a miss. The guide described the excellence of the five varieties of bread, along with a number of sweet breakfast bread options included with the breakfast or available for sale by the loaf. In actuality, the restaurant's bread was the standard store-bought bread, available at any Denny's and NOT for sale by the loaf.

While I'm sure that all of the places mentioned in the guide were at one time as wonderful as described, it appears that the authors may not be doing careful research on the continuing quality of some of their old favorites.

Despite this, I'm still giving the book two stars because it is excellent, mouth-watering reading. I wish the places they described actually existed, though!
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By wogan TOP 100 REVIEWER on April 8, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As usual the Sterns have published another delicious book. They list eating places all over the 48 states. These are those road food diners and joints where you might not stop, sometimes because you wonder what might lie in wait for you behind that door. This even includes new ideas for places you might not have known about in your own area. With this book you can have confidence that here is real food, not that processed, frozen brought to the building and warmed up stuff that passes for most food you get when traveling or even eating locally; but food like your mother - if she was a fantastic cook would have made you. It is true you can get this information and more on their web site, but this is so wonderful to carry in the car. I have never been to a place that they recommended and been sorry. In fact sometimes the places we have stopped have led to the highlights of a trip. We have met locals, gone down roads and stopped at spots we would not have traveled to. It has been our experience that when we enter these mostly beloved local eateries, we are welcomed and we know we are visiting the real America.
With this edition some much needed corrections have been done; there were a couple eating places that had been closed for a long time before their previous edition.
I do wish that more of an effort was made to review and include places that are nearer well traveled tourist sites, so we can avoid the chains and the same restaurants we could eat at while at home. There is a huge lack of information for central Florida and that would have been very welcome. There is almost nothing for traveling along the east coastline in ocean areas and the Outer Banks area with the exception of along the Maine coast; and some western states especially have very little listed. I know it would add to the effort and bulk of the book, but some more directions from interstates would really be nice.
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35 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Konrad Baumeister VINE VOICE on February 1, 2006
Format: Paperback
Roadfood isn't exactly the American Michelin Guide to fine dining, but it fills perhaps an even more important niche, in the sense that it covers the types of places real people might actually find themselves eating at. As such, it aims at finding places serving food unique or typical of the region, joints that do the seemingly ordinary, extraordinarily well.

The book is organized by region and then by state within that region. New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the Deep South are likely the best covered area, the Great Plains the least. The maps won't help you find a place, and directions are hardly ever included in the reviews, but phone numbers are listed and a reader with a cell phone can do the rest. The Sterns visit lobster shacks in Maine, ethnic delis in New York, barbecue and oyster joints in the south, and so on. Their taste runs very much to the real and indisputably authentic; good service, friendly people and atmosphere, and pride in cooking always win out over fancy decorations. I have been to over 40 of the establishments listed here over the years, and only very few fall into the `fine dining' category of any other guidebook. There are some pricey places listed, but they are far outnumbered by places where a meal and a soda or beer can be had for under $15.

There are cities that are more thoroughly covered than others; but let's face it, Chicago and New York have a lot more and better places that fit the Roadfood mission than Billings, Montana might. It's not a guide to your neighborhood eateries, it's a guide to funky places around the country, wherever they may be. Someone looking for cheap and good grub in their hometown should consult their local phone book.

I take this book with me on every road trip.
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