Haydn: The Creation

October 27, 1992 | Format: MP3

$17.98
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:01
30
2
2:41
30
3
4:05
30
4
2:06
30
5
2:10
30
6
0:43
30
7
4:23
30
8
0:29
30
9
5:43
30
10
0:10
30
11
2:09
30
12
0:39
30
13
2:44
30
14
4:02
30
15
0:26
30
16
8:13
30
17
2:01
30
18
0:22
30
19
7:05
Disc 2
30
1
0:27
30
2
3:24
30
3
3:43
30
4
0:38
30
5
3:58
30
6
0:25
30
7
8:10
30
8
4:04
30
9
10:52
30
10
2:38
30
11
8:11
30
12
0:29
30
13
3:31
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 27, 1992
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Telarc
  • Total Length: 1:46:42
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0019O0WEA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,155 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Very poetic and very touching.
David C. Green
One piece that is very well sung and is particularly uplifting is the hymn of thanks and praise to God which Adam and Eve sing.
booklover
Still, this is a minor quibble in a recording so good in all respects.
Larry VanDeSande

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Larry VanDeSande VINE VOICE on July 14, 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I looked around for a new English language version of Haydn's "Creation" to use for practice before I sang in the chorus for my local choral society's performance of Haydn's "Creation" earlier this year. I am not naturally drawn to Robert Shaw or his work, having been disappointed by him in recordings of Poulenc, Bach, Penderecki and other composers.
I wanted a new recording to replace the one I'd been listening to -- Hogwood's version. It was fine in a hyperactive English way. Many of the choruses were taken at presto and the enunciation of his very large group was never very clear. I considered Rattle and borrowed a copy from my local library. After hearing it I dismissed it from consideration, since I would not enjoy it over an extended period. I tried a couple German language versions, too. The famous Karajan has a starry quartet but is a might overdone in my book. Bruno Weil's traversal if forgettable, as is Gardiner. I found someone willing to sell me the Shaw version for $15 which was a good deal even by resale shop standards.
I would agree with almost everything written in the Amazon review of this music and would add this: what makes this version sparkle, aside from lustrous singing by everyone involved, is Shaw's deep understanding of Haydn and his performance method. Above all things, Josef Haydn was a moderate. He loved a good joke and even fell in love once, but his linchpin emotion was temperance and moderation. Performances of his music that go beyond this fail, in my opinion.
Shaw's version uses judicious speeds and an approach that is consistent throughout. His soloists are all exceptional and I would point out the notable contributions of Heidi Grant Murphy and James McGuire as Eve and Adam, respectively.
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44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 15, 2003
Format: Audio CD
The person who wrote the "arrogant SOB" review should know that Shaw was the opposite-- generous, good-hearted, and with high ideals.
But let's forget about that. What's interesting about this remark is the misconception of "service" and "arrogance." Haydn published The Creation with a German and an English text. Why? Well, partly because it was commissioned in London, but partly because composers back then expected the audience to actually understand the text. Unfortunately, Haydn's librettist, Baron von Swieten, did not have very idiomatic English. So you end up with lines like "The large and arching front sublime, of wisdom deep declares the seat." Got it? Now imagine hearing it sung. Huh?
Robert Shaw worked out a text that actually can be understood at first hearing by English-speaking audiences, but also fits the music perfectly. That line becomes, with Shaw, "His broad and arching, noble brow proclaims of wisdom's deep abode." Actually understandable, for a change. Great music deserves this.
Shaw had the same aim as composers once had: giving the audience something meaningful, not just voices singing incomprehensible texts.
If you're a native German speaker, or fluent in the language, there's no reason not get a fine recording of the German text (Karajan or Gardiner). But if you're an Anglophone (or a choral conductor with Anglophone audiences) Shaw's the text to use. In his recording you get a complete, integrated experience of words and music. Haydn would have have loved it.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By D. Seymour on April 26, 2002
Format: Audio CD
If the Messiah is an oratorio for the Christmas season, then the Creation is the perfect oratorio for spring. It captures the same excitement and wonder as a case of spring fever when all you want to do is jump in your car & drive with your head out the window pondering why the sky is blue. The choppy opening depicts chaos from which God begins to organize his creation. Right after "and there was light" there is the perfect orchestral moment of the light piercing the darkness. You will be taken up with the aria and chorus 'What wonder doth his work reveal'. Dawn Upshaw is nothing short of magnificent throughout the recording - she really does have the voice of an angel. She joyously reigns over her aria 'On mighty wings' without the slightest hint of effort. The chorus bursts forth splendidly for 'Awake the harp', especially on the line "Rejoice in the Lord, the Mighty Lord!". And if you like that, just wait a few minutes until they fire up 'The heavens are telling'. Jon Humphrey makes out believably well during his tunefully saccharine aria 'In native worth'. The fun comes bounding back, however, with the chorus 'Fulfilled at last the glorious work'. Just when you thought it was created already, Adam & Eve join the party to sing "Ah, sweet mystery of life" sentiments to each other for about 20 minutes. Quite silly. But, all is forgiven for the final, spirited choral fugue 'Sing to God'. Shaw and Parker's English translation rests perfectly on top of the music. This disc is a sheer delight!
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By "vamusicbuff" on March 14, 2001
Format: Audio CD
This was the first Creation recording I ever listened to--7 years ago (which dates me but anyways). Shaw is at his best when conducting music like the Creation, the Verdi, the Brahms' Requiem. It is also one of the FEW recordings of the work in English. The pacing is nice and even, and the soloists (Dawn Upshaw and Anthony Rolf Johnson) are superb in their roles.
Haydn conceived of the work as a bi-lingual oratorio, meaning you could present it in either language. Well, when Baron von Swieten who re-translated the work (originally an English text, then translated into German) back in to English, it had some major problems.
The 19th century English music publisher Novello did a fairly good job at correcting his mistakes, and set the standard for community choruses singing the work. Others like musicologist Nicholas Temperley look to texts that more faithfully interpret the original English. And Mr. Shaw is no exception--except he was working more from a poetic sense of the libretto instead of a strict, literal view of the words. So some of the lyrics have been changed. One could certainly make a case for any change, esp. in the soloists' parts. But to change certain lines in the big choruses, like "Achieved is the Glorious Work" and "The Heavens are Telling" is tantamount to musical vandalism. But it's a minor annoyance for me, and since there are fewer choruses in this work than for Mendelssohn's Elijah (which he also re-translates), I can live with it (and insert my own words as I drive along and sing in my car).
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