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Robert Frost: Collected Poems, Prose, and Plays (Library of America) Hardcover – October 1, 1995


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Robert Frost: Collected Poems, Prose, and Plays (Library of America) + Wallace Stevens : Collected Poetry and Prose (Library of America) + Elizabeth Bishop: Poems, Prose and Letters (Library of America)
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Product Details

  • Series: Library of America (Book 81)
  • Hardcover: 1036 pages
  • Publisher: Library of America; 1ST edition (October 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 188301106X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1883011062
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.1 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #65,727 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Never before has there been a more comprehensive collection of Frost in a single volume. Included are all of the plays, a generous selection of prose, all collected poems, and 94 uncollected poems, as well as 17 poems that were previously unpublished. The 1949 Complete Poems is the principle source for the poetry. In The Clearing (1962), as the only subsequent volume Frost published, is given a separate contents entry. Sources are given for all published and unpublished work. The 45 pages of notes cover the "significant differences" between first editions and the Complete Poems, including deleted dedications, notes and dates, and changes in wording. The notes also include helpful definitions and frequent attribution of quotation. Of the prose we are told that most of what is included "bears directly on [Frost's] work as a poet." Many of these texts are based on significant new editorial work by Richardson. Recommended for most collections.-Steven R. Ellis, Pennsylvania State Univ. Libs., State Colleg.-- work as a poet." Many of these texts are based on significant new editorial work by Richardson. Recommended for most collections.
Steven R. Ellis, Pennsylvania State Univ. Libs., State College
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

A-wishing Well
Accidentally On Purpose
Acquainted With The Night
After Apple Picking
Afterflakes
The Aim Was Song
All Revelation
America Is Hard To See
An Answer
Any Size We Please
The Armful
Asking For Roses
Assurance
Astrometaphysical
At Woodward's Gardens
Atmosphere; Inscription For A Garden Wall
Auspex
Away!
The Ax-helve
The Bad Island -- Easter
The Bear
The Bearer Of Evil Tidings
A Bed In The Barn
Beech
Bereft
Beyond Words
Birches
The Birds Do Thus
The Birthplace
The Black Cottage
A Blue Ribbon At Amesbury
Blue-butterfly Day
Blueberries
Boeotian
Bond And Free
The Bonfire
A Boundless Moment
The Broken Drought
A Brook In The City
Brown's Descent, Or, The Willy-nilly Slide
Build Soil -- A Political Pastoral
Bursting Rapture
But Outer Space
A Cabin In The Clearing; For Alfred Edwards
Caesar's Lost Transport Ships
Canis Major
Carpe Diem
A Case For Jefferson
The Census-taker
Choose Something Like A Star
Christmas Trees; A Christmas Circular Letter
Class Hymn
Clear And Colder
Clear And Colder; Boston Common
A Cliff Dwelling
Closed For Good
Closed For Good
A Cloud Shadow
The Cocoon
The Code - Heroics
Come In
A Considerable Speck (microscopic)
A Correction
The Courage To Be New
The Cow In Apple Time
The Cow's In The Corn; A One-act Irish Play In Rhyme
The Death Of The Hired Man
The Demiurge's Laugh
Departmental
Desert Places
Design
Despair
Devotion
Directive
The Discovery Of The Madeiras; A Rhyme Of Hackluyt
Does No One At All Ever Feel This Way In The Least?
The Door In The Dark
Down The Brook
The Draft Horse
A Dream Of Julius Caesar
A Dream Pang
A Drumlin Woodchuck
Dust In The Eyes
Dust Of Snow
The Egg And The Machine
An Empty Threat
An Encounter
Ends
An Equalizer
Escapist -- Never
Etherealizing
Evening In A Sugar Orchard
Evensong
Evil Tendencies Cancel
The Exposed Nest
The Falls
The Fear
The Fear Of God
The Fear Of Man
The Figure In The Doorway
Fire And Ice
Fireflies In The Garden
Fish-leap Fall
Five Nocturnes: 1. The Night Light
Five Nocturnes: 2. Were I In Trouble
Five Nocturnes: 3. Bravado
Five Nocturnes: 4. On Making Certain Anything Has Happened
Five Nocturnes: 5. In The Long Night
The Flood
The Flower Boat
Flower Guidance
Flower-gathering
For Allan %who Wanted To See How I Wrote A Poem
For Once, Then, Something
For Travelers Going Sidereal
Forest Flowers
A Fountain, A Bottle, A Donkey's Ears, And Some Books
Four-room Shack Aspiring High
Fragmentary Blue
The Freedom Of The Moon
From Iron: Tools And Weapons; To Ahmed S. Bokhari
From Plane To Plane
Gathering Leaves
Genealogical
Ghost House
The Gift Outright
The Gift Outright
Gift Outright Of 'the Gift Outright'; With Some Preliminary History ..
A Girl's Garden
God's Garden
Going For Water
The Gold Hesperidee
Good Hours
Good Relief
Good-by And Keep Cold
Greece
The Grindstone
The Gum Gatherer
Haec Fabula Docet
Hannibal
Happiness Makes Up In Height For What It Lacks In Length
The Hardship Of Accounting
Her Husband Gave Her A Ring
The Hill Wife: House Fear
The Hill Wife: Loneliness
The Hill Wife: The Impulse
The Hill Wife: The Oft-repeated Dream
The Hill Wife: The Smile
A Hillside Thaw
Home Burial
The Housekeeper
How Hard It Is To Keep From Being King When It's In You ...
A Hundred Collars
Hyla Brook
I Am A Mede And Persian
I Could Give All To Time
I Only Go
I Will Sing You One-o
Immigrants
An Importer
In A Disused Graveyard
In A Glass Of Cider
In A Poem
In A Vale
In Dives' Dive
In England
In Equal Sacrifice
In Hardwood Groves
In Neglect
In The Clearing: Frontispiece
In The Home Stretch
In Time Of Cloudburst
In Winter In The Woods Alone
The Inequities Of Debt
Innate Helium
Into My Own
The Investment
Iota Subscript
Iris By Night
It Bids Pretty Fair
It Is The Year Two Thousand
It Takes All Sorts Of Indoor And Outdoor Schooling
The Kitchen Chimney
Kitty Hawk
La Noche Triste
The Last Mowing
The Last Word Of A Bluebird; As Told To A Child
A Late Walk
The Later Minstrel
A Leaf-treader
Leaves Compared With Flowers
The Lesson For Today
Let Congress Do It
Let's Not Think
Letter To Leonard Bacon
Letter To Louis Untermeyer, 1931
Letter To Louis Untermeyer, 1944
Letter To Stark Young
The Line-gang
A Line-storm Song
Lines Written In Dejection On The Eve Of Great Success
The Literate Farmer And The Planet Venus
A Little Kingdom
Locked Out; As Told To A Child
The Lockless Door
Lodged
A Lone Striker
Looking For A Sunset Bird In Winter
A Loose Mountain (telescopic)
The Lost Faith
The Lost Follower
Lost In Heaven
Love And A Question
Love Being All One
The Lovely Shall Be Choosers
Lowes Took The Obvious Position
Lucretius Versus The Lake Poets
A Man Is As Tall As His Height
Maple
Marx And Engels
A Masque Of Mercy
A Masque Of Reason
The Master Speed
Meeting And Passing
Mending Wall
The Middleness Of The Road
The Middletown Murder
Midsummer Birds
The Milky Way Is A Cowpath
The Mill City
A Minor Bird
Misgiving
A Missive Missile
A Mood Apart
Moon Compasses
The Most Of It
The Mountain
Mowing
My Butterfly
My Giving
My November Guest
A Nature Note
The Need Of Being Versed In Country Things
Neither Out Far Nor In Deep
Never Again Would Birds' Song Be The Same
A Never Naught Song
New Grief
New Hampshire
No Holy Wars For Them
Not All There
Not Of School Age
Not Quite Social
Not To Keep
Nothing Ever So Sincere
Nothing Gold Can Stay
November
Now Close The Windows
The Objection To Being Stepped On
October
Of The Stones Of The Place
The Offer
Oh Thou That Spinnest The Wheel
Old Age
The Old Barn At The Bottom Of The Fogs
An Old Man's Winter Night
On A Bird Singing In Its Sleep
On A Tree Fallen Across The Road (to Hear Us Talk)
On Being Chosen Poet Of Vermont
On Being Idolized
On Going Unnoticed
On Looking Up By Chance At The Constellations
On Our Sympathy With The Under Dog
On Taking From The Top To Broaden The Base
On Talk Of Peace At This Time
On The Heart's Beginning To Cloud The Mind
On The Inflation Of The Currency, 1919
On The Sale Of My Farm
Once By The Pacific
One Favored Acorn
One Guess
One More Brevity
One Step Backward Taken
The Onset
Our Camp; In The Autumn Woods
Our Doom To Bloom
Our Hold On The Planet
Our Singing Strength
'out, Out -'
The Oven Bird
Pan With Us
The Pans
Pares Continuas Fututiones
The Parlor Joke
Parting
A Passing Glimpse; To Ridge Torrence On Last Looking Into Hesperides
A Patch Of Old Snow
Paul's Wife
Pea Brush
The Peaceful Shepherd
A Peck Of Gold
Peril Of Hope
Pertinax
Place For A Third
The Planners
Plowmen
Pod Of The Milkweed
Poets Are Born Not Made
A Prayer In Spring
Precaution
Pride Of Ancestry
The Prophet
The Prophets Really Prophesy As Mystics, The Commentators ...
Provide, Provide
The Purpose Of The Universal Plan
Pursuit Of The Word
Pussy-willow Time
Putting In The Seed
Quandary
The Quest Of The Purple-fringed
A Question
Questioning Faces
The Rabbit-hunter
The Rain Bath
Range-finding
The Reason Of My Perfect Ease
A Record Stride
A Reflex
Reluctance
A Restoration
Revelation
Riders
The Road Not Taken
A Roadside Stand
A Rogers Group
The Rose Family
Rose Pogonias
The Rubaiyat Of Carl Burell
The Runaway
The Sachem Of The Clouds (a Thanksgiving Legend)
Sand Dunes
The Secret Sits
The Self-seeker
A Semi-revolution
A Serious Step Lightly Taken
A Servant To Servants
The Seven Arts
The Silken Tent
Sitting By A Bush In Broad Daylight
Skeptic
Snow
A Soldier
Some Science Fiction
Something For Hope
Song Of The Wave
The Sound Of The Trees
The Span Of Life
Spoils Of The Dead
Spring Pools
A Star In A Stone-boat; For Lincoln Macveagh
The Star-splitter
Stars
A Steeple On The House
Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening
Storm Fear
The Strong Are Saying Nothing
The Subverted Flower
A Summer's Garden
Summering
Sycamore
Sym-ball-ism
The Telephone
Ten Thirty A.m.
The Thatch
There Are Roughly Zones
They Were Welcome To Their Belief
The Three Generations Of Men
Time Out
A Time To Talk
The Times Table
To A Moth Seen In Winter
To A Thinker
To A Young Wretch (boethian)
To An Ancient
To E.t.
To Earthward
To Prayer I Think I Go
To The Right Person
To The Thawing Wind
Too Anxious For Rivers
Traces
The Traitor
Tree At My Window, Window Tree
Trespass
The Trial By Experience
A Trial Run
Triple Bronze
Trouble Rhyming
The Tuft Of Flowers
Twilight
Two Leading Lights
Two Look At Two
Two Tramps In Mud Time
Two Witches: 1. The Witch Of Coos
Two Witches: 2. The Pauper Witch Of Grafton
U.s. 1946 King's X
Unharvested
An Unhistoric Spot
Unless I Call It A Pewter Tray
An Unstamped Letter In Our Rural Letter Box
The Valley's Singing Day
The Vanishing Red
The Vantage Point
Version
The Vindictives
Voice Ways
Waiting Afield At Dusk
Wanton Waste
Warning
Waspish
Waste Or Cod Fish Eggs
We Vainly Wrestle With The Blind Belief
Were That Star Shining There By Name
West-running Brook
What Fifty Said
What Thing A Bird Would Love
When The Speed Comes
The White-tailed Hornet
Why Wait For Science
Wild Grapes
Willful Homing
The Wind And The Rain
Wind And Window Flower
A Winter Eden
Winter Ownership
Winter Winds
A Winter's Night
A Wish To Comply
The Wood-pile
The Wrights' Biplane
The Young Birch
-- Table of Poems from Poem Finder®

Here is the canonical Frost ... devotedly and richly presented. -- Derek Walcott, The New Republic

[P]resenting Frost ... fully and intelligently, The Library of America has exceeded its usual high standards and produced a book you can't afford not to own. -- William Pritchard, The Boston Globe

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
20
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
This is as good as it gets.
Beverley R. Enright
The Collected Poems is the reprint that takes up most of the book and has its own table of contents as well.
Craig Matteson
Robert Frost was an amazing poet.
David J. Gluck

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By NotATameLion on October 4, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I do not really I believe that all the stuff here merits five stars (books like these throw in the kitchen sink when covering their subjects). Yet, when I ask myself--"how can I possibly not give some of the stuff here more than five stars?" I cannot sufficiently answer the question.
A poet like Frost comes around maybe once in a generation (if we're lucky). Some of his works are undeniably for the ages. This volume is filled with the treasures Frost left to us.
Works like "The Tuft of Flowers," "The Death of the Hired Man," "Blueberries," "The Road Not Taken," "Fire and Ice," and "Mending Wall" (a poem that literally changed my life) are genuine contributions to world literature.
A ton of Frost's poetry is to be found in this edition. I am struck by how consistent and sure he is in his poetry. This man was a great poet. I am not a big fan of reading plays. I'd rather see them interpreted by actors on a stage. I'm not going to lie and say Frost was a great playwright--he was not. But all the same, I am glad to have read the works contained in this volume.
I must say that The Library of America's volume are all handsomely done and attractively presented. The texts are extremely readable for only being in ten-point font. For the most point, I ignored the notes (I prefer to make heads or tales of things on my own.) The few that I read surprised me because they actually were enlightening.
I recommend this volume most highly.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Jay Dee on May 3, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Are you someone who buys for the art of the book as much for the art of the contents? If so, you can't do better than any of the stellar titles from the Library Of America series of books... This splendid collection of Frost will not dissapoint...One of the many treats of this volume as is virtually true with all of the Library Of America volumes is the ease with which you can hold it comfortably in your hand...Exclusively thin acid free paper is the secret and this volume packs in a two inch thick volume what normal paper would weigh you down with five or six inches of...

What nice unedited and thorough Frost you get here!...Speaking of editing, the true Frost afficionado will want to be sure to avoid items edited by an Edward Latham...This edition is Latham free and contains Frost's work as he originally wrote it...Unfortunately, from the late sixties on, several editions of Frost went forward with unnecessary "clean up" editing by this very punctuation weilding word meister...He added to many editions extra commas and punctuation in places Frost never originally put it...If you'd like to read a much more thorough analysis of this than I can describe here, be sure to pick up a copy of writer Donald Hall's " Breakfast Served Anytime" and read the article he wrote exposing Latham and his added cleansing of Frost's work...This Library Of America edition captures Frost unedited and at his purest and best...

The reader can choose here from a smorgasbord of outstanding selections and offerings...Poetry, prose, plays...there is quite a variety of choice fare offered here...

In the words of Mr. Frost.." I'm going up to the meadow to check the newborn calf,...I shan't be long...You come too!"
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Richard on April 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Reading Robert Frost aloud is one of the most peaceful interludes in life. I live in New England and taking this volume for a walk in the woods and reading it there makes me more appreciative of nature and the creativity of this great author. I learned to enjoy him at Amherst College, where he once taught, reading an American Literature assignment outdooors on a warm Octobee afternoon. This is the best of the three collections I own. The Library of America publishes quality books and I'm sure this particular volume will outlive the other Frost collections I own.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By offeck on February 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Very attractive, solid and sturdy, materials are very well organized. Not the cheapest, but well worth it -- especially at the discount Amazon provides... And then there's the content -- top notch stuff, perfect.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David J. Gluck on May 1, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Robert Frost was an amazing poet. This is the most complete collection of his writings to include his essays and lectures, which are very instructional for writing and understanding poetry, as well as some letters and short plays. His ideas and explanations were new at the time and not necessarily accepted as he would first "put them out there", but today, our greatest poets seem to have followed his lead with their own creations.

Frost was bold, this collection is evasive of time (still relevant today), and complete. I highly recommend this volume to all who are interested in American Literature and one of the best poets America has offered to the world up to and through the 1960's.

David J. Gluck author of "Life's Pages"
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Mchenry on March 1, 2002
Format: Hardcover
An excellent book that contains all of this works to perfect form. This book as letters that he sent to other people. I have read this whole book a few times, it is perfect. Get the book.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Craig Matteson HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Robert Frost is a unique American voice that many people love. A few reject him, but the majority of those whom he was writing for still love and admire his poetry. His fans always have favorites and can quote lines and whole poems from memory. When a poet gets into people's memories and hearts it is not a sure sign of greatness, but it is a good indicator of something special.

In some ways his works have aged because they are about an America that has passed. One poem that I think catches a lot of the issues surround Frost is "The Literate Farmer and the Planet Venus". This piece is about the electrification of rural America and the strangeness of it all. It talks about the speeding up of life and wonders if the future will simply do away with beds because there won't be time to sleep. The poem is set in 1926, but was published in 1942 as part of "A Witness Tree". I don't know when it was written, but if it was written around the Second World War its nostalgia seems a bit more cynical to me (which I suspect to be the case). However, if it was written back in the late 1920s then it has more whimsy and an earnest wonder.

This poet does have a capacity for irony and bite as well as humor and whimsy. His words are more conversational than lyric and that is fine. They have less music, but a great deal of color and subtle observation. It really doesn't matter what any critic says about Frost. He will outlast all of them. What matters is what he says to you. He is certainly a more worthwhile read than most of what gets published nowadays, just expect to have to deal with some words and references to an America from a century ago.

This volume from the Library of America is terrific. The table of contents in the front refers to the whole volume.
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