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Robert Frost Reads: The Road Not Taken (20136) Audio, Cassette – November 1, 1987


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Audio, Cassette, November 1, 1987
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Series: 20136
  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Recorded Books (November 1987)
  • ISBN-10: 999884956X
  • ISBN-13: 978-9998849563
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,749,839 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Originally recorded between 1950 and 1952 at New York City's Poetry Center, the first of these two cassettes captures Frost reading some of his most famous poems ("Fire and Ice," "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"), using his voice's dramatic strength and surprising flexibility to bring full life to the diverse characters he shaped with his written words. The second cassette, recorded at his New England home in 1956, presents Frost at his most evocative: crusty, warm, deeply moving and contemplative. Poems include "The Road Not Taken," "Mending Wall," and "Death of a Hired Man." In each, Frost reads with a generous spirit, infusing his naturalistic images with subtle meanings and precise wordings, a perfect blend for his uniquely realized language. Listen to Robert Frost read "The Pasture." Visit our audio help page for more information. (Running time: 1.75 hours, 2 cassettes) --George Laney --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Born in San Francisco in 1874, Robert Frost was one of America's leading 20th-century poets and a four-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize. An essentially pastoral poet often associated with rural New England, Frost wrote poems whose philosophical dimensions transcEND any region.

After his father's death in 1885, when young Frost was 11, the family left California and settled in Massachusetts. Frost attended high school in that state, entered Dartmouth College, but remained less than one semester. Returning to Massachusetts, he taught school and worked in a mill and as a newspaper reporter. In 1894 he sold "My Butterfly: An Elegy" to The Independent, a New York literary journal. A year later he married Elinor White. From 1897 to 1899 he attended Harvard College as a special student but left without a degree. Over the next ten years he wrote (but rarely published) poems, operated a farm in Derry, New Hampshire (purchased for him by his paternal grandfather), and supplemented his income by teaching at Derry's Pinkerton Academy.

In 1912, at the age of 38, he sold the farm and used the proceeds to take his family to England, where he could devote himself entirely to writing. His efforts to establish himself and his work were almost immediately successful. A Boy's Will was accepted by a London publisher and brought out in 1913, followed a year later by North of Boston.

The Frosts sailed for the United States in February 1915 and landed in New York City two days after the U.S. publication of North of Boston (the first of his books to be published in America). Sales of that book and of A Boy's Will enabled Frost to buy a farm in Franconia, New Hampshire; to place new poems in literary periodicals and publish a third book, Mountain Interval (1916); and to embark on a long career of writing, teaching, and lecturing. In 1924 he received a Pulitzer Prize in poetry for New Hampshire (1923). He was lauded again for Collected Poems (1930), A Further Range (1936), and A Witness Tree (1942). Over the years he received an unprecedented number and range of literary, academic, and public honors.

Frost's importance as a poet derives from the power and memorability ofparticular poems. "The Death of the Hired Man" (from North of Boston)combines lyric and dramatic poetry in blank verse. "After Apple-Picking"(from the same volume) is a free-verse dream poem with philosophicalundertones. "The Road Not Taken" and "Birches" (from MountainInterval) and the oft-studied "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" (fromNew Hampshire) exemplify Frost's ability to join the pastoral andphilosophical modes in lyrics of unforgettable beauty.

Frost's poetic and political conservatism caused him to lose favor with someliterary critics, but his reputation as a major poet is secure. Frost died in Boston in 1963. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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By Jacqueline M. Haber on November 23, 2013
Format: Audio Cassette Verified Purchase
How lucky for us that we can still hear his real voice reading his beloved poems. I listen too it while I drive.
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5 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 30, 1999
Format: Audio Cassette
I bought this book for my father as a present. when i gave it to him he loved it.
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