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136 of 143 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon July 9, 2012
Please note: This title is heavily abridged and aimed at children but, the Amazon title doesn't tell you this. From the inside cover of the book:

"This Great classic for Children by Dalmation press has been carefully condensed and adapted from the original version ... We kept the well-known phrases for you. We kept the author's style. And we kept the important imagery and heart of the tale."

With its large font and many illustrations the book comes out to 181 pages; whereas, the Sterling Classic unabridged with its regular sized font and no illustrations comes out to 232 pages. This gives an indication of how condensed this version is.

This one has its place as a kids version and should be clearly marked as such.
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183 of 197 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon September 8, 2007
Treasure Island is perhaps THE classic pirate's tale. Robert Louis Stevenson, the author, created a rich story of adventure and treachery on the high seas all seen through the eyes of a boy named Jim Hawkins. Jim starts off as the son of tavern owners in a humble little port village. When an old seaman stays at the tavern, trouble soon follows him in the form of a pirate crew seeking revenge. I will not give away any more specific plot points, but events move forward to a great treasure hunt, treachery, and a surprisingly engaging story for adults as well as children.

Jim Hawkins is the hero of the story and he's a good lad with a stout heart. Long John Silver is the real star, however, and his character is a fascinating character study in moral ambiguity... or perhaps a study in amoral perfection. The pirate language is good and thick but this edition has plenty of notes to help you decipher some of the references that have become too obscure for today's readers. The plot moves along very briskly with no wasted scenes.

In short, Treasure Island well deserves its status as a beloved classic. It's a story of suspense and adventure that can be enjoyed at a child's level, but has substance for adults as well. I would recommend without reserve it to virtually anyone.
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59 of 60 people found the following review helpful
on February 11, 2010
I am a high school English teacher, and I am a huge fan of the original Treasure Island. That said, I love the Classic Start series as a mother who believes in introducing my children to the classics from a very early age. I began using the series with my daughter when she was five. We have read Black Beauty, The Little Princess, Heidi, and Pollyanna to name a few, so I am very familiar with the content of the series, and I keep coming back for more.

My son just turned six. There is no way that he would be able to sit through nor understand the original, but with this abridged version, he not only becomes familiar with the story, he falls in love with it as well. We began reading Treasure Island last night, and he begged for more and more. Finally, after six chapters I insisted that I needed to read to his older sister. While I did, this little kindegartner slugged through another chapter, struggling over every word to try to get more of the story. I couldn't have been more thrilled; that is the love of reading and the love of good literature with which I am trying to bless my children.

Classic Starts are a fantastic way to begin, in my opinion. I see no difference between a beginning pianist first learning an easy version of a classical piano concerto and a young reader first introduced to an abridged version of a classic that, in it's original form would be above both his context and vocabulary level. I am sure that when my son does encounter the original, and he will--I'll make sure of that--he will not only be more ready, he will be more excited to get the rest of the story, thanks to his familiarity with and fondness for Billy Bones, Jim, and Long John Silver. My thanks, Classic Starts.
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151 of 166 people found the following review helpful
on August 21, 1999
How can you even review the ultimate pirate book of all time? I read it when I was 9 and loved it. I read it again when I was 34 and loved it again! (Actually, I read it several times between, as well.) Long John Silver is arguably one of the most Macchiavellian characters you will ever find between the covers of a book. (I'm mainly reviewing it to raise the average rating. Anyone who thinks this book is boring has to have a screw loose!) From the arrival of the mysterious Billy Bones, to the attack on the inn, to the sea voyage, to the mutiny, to the battle for the island, to the treasure hunt, even to the final fate of John Silver, this book is a stunning rollercoaster of suspense and adventure! I'd give it ten stars if I could.
Here's a bit of information you other readers might enjoy: the meaning of the pirates' song--
Fifteen men on a dead man's chest Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum!
The real-life pirate, Edward Teach (Blackbeard the Pirate) once marooned 15 of his men on a small island named Dead Man's Chest. He put them ashore with no weapons, equipment or supplies--just a bottle of rum.
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on April 7, 2008
I have a copy of this as well as the one with Wyeth illustrations. I prefer this for the kids as there are more illustrations throughout the book, it is a bit larger and pages printed to give a parchment look. The quality of the illustrations is outstanding. This is a beautiful book.
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36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
on November 23, 2005
Treasure Island

Retold by Chris Tait Original story by Robert Louis Stevenson

I am ten-years-old and my Teacher, Mrs. McAuley asked us to write a book review on the book we read. This is mine.

This book is just one of the Classic Starts series. These books are easy to read and good for all ages. I highly recommend this book as a good family novel because it's easy to make a mind image of putting yourself in the story. I would like to see this made into a movie.

The story has many different settings, first you start out in Admiral BenBow Inn and then we go on board the Hispanola ship, eventually it all ends up on Treasure Island. At the Inn we meet Jim Hawkins and his mom who rents a room to Billy Bones. Billy Bones turned out to be a pirate with Captain Flint's secret treasure map that Jim Hawkins found.

Jim shares the map with his trusted friends and they all decide to buy a ship, hire a crew, and set sail for the treasure. Chapter Seven describes the crew which includes: The captain (Captain Smollet), the ships doctor (Doctor Livesey), the cook (Long John Silvers), 2nd mate (Officer Trelawney), 1st mate (Arrow), and 19 additional crew members. Can you tell which crew members are evil and which are good, read the book and see. However, it'll be hard to tell whether Long John Silvers is either a friend or a foe.

With so many crew members and only one treasure, a battle is about to spawn. Good sailors, and evil pirates, who will become victorious and receive Flint's treasure,?

Near the end they finally land on Treasure Island. While searching for the treasure suddenly... "Fifteen men on a deadmans chest--- Yo ho ho in a bottle of rum" everyone screams in fear, at the familiar voice... but if Flint's dead and the Island is uninhabited, who can it be?
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on April 29, 2005
These three stories are amongst London's best fictional works- some say they *are* the best, especially, "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang", it all depends on one's taste, of course, but rest assured, these stories are gripping and the intrigue of their moving plots keeps one glued to the book.

As a freind once said of "Call..." and "...Fang": "These are just about the two doggone best [canine] stories I have ever had the pleasure to read!". Indeed.

All three stories are set in Alaska during the gold rush days of the late 1800's and London spent time there to absorb the feeling of this beautiful, but unforgiving land. He is so descriptive of the landscape, one feels like they are there themselves. This is the magic of London's writing- he so expertly drops the reader right into the scenery and the characters. Indeed, we see and feel what they see and feel- even the animals- especially, the animals, for they have personalities that engage and create both sympathy and admiration for their trials, tribulations and triumphs. London is one of those that the measure of literary genius is judged by and taking in just about any of his works will demonstrate why.

The basic storyline of the "The Call of the Wild" has a dog named "Buck" who is living in a comfortable setting in California, suddenly yanked away by black-market dog thieves who are selling them to the ravenous needs of the gold prospector's supply market where they are then pressed into the tortuous dogsled industry. Buck eventually gets free and joins his native soul-brothers, the wolves. From the human world back to his ancestral roots, hence, the calling of the wild instinct.

"White Fang" is the antithesis of Buck`s situation: a wolf pup raised partly by Indians, wolves, and eventually being absorbed all the way into the human world... you guessed it, in California where he settles into the same basic comfortable world that Buck was torn from. The tale of how that turn-of-events happens is as engaging as Buck's story.

"To Build A Fire" is a very short read and describes a man and the unforgiving, harsh winter of the Alaskan outback. He finds himself trapped by an intense snow storm and soon realizes that this normally easy trek is turning dangerous. What will happen? London skillfully gives us the psychological drama of harsh realities setting in.

For those that have not yet taken in any of London's work, this book is a good place to start. One might then want to take in more, including London's non-fictional work.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
All four things mentioned above can be found at your fingertips with Robert Louis Stevenson's "Treasure Island." Before Johnny Depp stumbled off of the Black Pearl, before Errol Flynn took us on swashbuckling journeys, and even before "Lucky" Jack Aubrey took to the water, Long John Silver and Jim Hawkins thrilled fans of high-seas adventure. "Treasure Island" tells the story of one young Jim Hawkins. It starts off in the simple setting of a family-owned inn where we are introduced to Billy Bones, an old seadog who has a secret. After a couple of visits from some strange characters, a confrontation occurs and a treasure map lands into the hands of Hawkins. From there, we set sail on the Hispaniola with Hawkins, the squire Trelawney, Dr. Livesey, the sea cook Silver, and a whole slew of pirates and scoundrels in general. All are after the treasure of Captain Flint, who graciously marked his treasure map with an "X" to show the way to the riches.

This is a wonderful tale of intrigue, double-crossing, greed, and swordplay. Promoted as a children's book, I'm sure that any adult will find this story captivating as well. Robert Louis Stevenson is a literary legend and deserves that honor based on this book alone. However, if you read this book and are interested to read more of Stevenson's work, check out "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," "Kidnapped," and "The Black Arrow." He also wrote a number of traveling books which are also fun to read.

Highly recommended.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 25, 2007
I sure hope that kids, and adults too, are still out there reading this book. What an amazing gift to English literature. I can still see in my mind the worn hardback copy of Treasure Island at my hometown library. This is the one book that I can remember reading two or three times over when I was a kid. I recently read it again to my own kids, and delighted in the masterful storytelling and drama of the book. The story is complex but well-known: Jim Hawkins, the resourceful son of an infirm innkeeper, finds himself the possesser of a pirate's treasure map. The benevolent greed that grips the town's merchants who want to exploit the map eventually leads to the malicious greed of a band of murderous and mutinous pirates led by the cunning and deceitful Long John Silver (who would enjoy a second career as a fried fish pitchman). The single-minded pursuit of GOLD leads all of these men to face the sea, disease, and privation, and to kill each other. The story ends well enough from our protagonist's point of view, but it all seems quite "realistic" and gritty. Don't pass this one over - a classic, richly told and written well, that deserves a place in your canon.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on October 26, 2012
This fantastic edition has a velvety-to-the-touch black hardcover with Wyeth's art emblazoned on the front. The illustrations inside have been given new life with vibrant color. The inside front and back covers include enlarged and mono-chromatic illustrations of Long John Silver and company that bleed off the borders. The pages are thick and leafy. This edition of "Treasure" is exactly that--it was made to be durably read over and over again and enjoyed for generations.
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