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Robot Alchemic Drive

by Enix
PlayStation2
Teen
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews) 79 / 100


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Product Details

  • ASIN: B000071OWY
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches ; 6.4 ounces
  • Media: CD-ROM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,245 in Video Games (See Top 100 in Video Games)
  • Discontinued by manufacturer: Yes

Product Description

Product Description

Yes, Robot Alchemic Drive is yet another giant robot game, but this one is different, I swear. The main difference is in the way you control your robot--not from a cockpit inside the robot's skull, or from a dynamic third-person perspective, but by remote control from the point of view of a human character on the ground.

This means you have to position your human character someplace where you can see the action (rooftops are good), but not so close that you get killed. This makes for some interesting strategic issues: when a battle rages from one end of the city to the other, you must decide if you should continue trying to control your robot, who has now become a distant figure on the horizon, or move your human character in for a closer look, temporarily leaving your robot helpless to defend itself. But the best part of the game's human element is that, while in other giant robot games you eventually feel like the buildings are stage props and you are just some normal-sized guy in a metal suit, R.A.D. never loses its dramatic sense of scale. The heavy, lumbering movement of the robots also adds to the sense of realism. Each limb of your robot is controlled individually (R1 and L2 for the legs, left and right analog sticks for the arms), so every step you take is an earth-shaking, control-rumbling event.

The game's story and characters (designed by Toshihiro Kawamoto, creator of Cowboy Bebop) are very much in the style of Japanese anime, which is good or bad depending on how you feel about science fiction melodramas with soft-voiced, big-eyed teenage orphans.

Here are the only really annoying features of the game: 1) though you can fast-forward through each individual line of dialogue, it's impossible to skip it altogether, even if you've heard it 10 times, and 2) the action is often interrupted with pointless communications from "headquarters." Despite a few design flaws, though, this is a fun game that finally puts the "giant" bac

Amazon.com

Yes, Robot Alchemic Drive is yet another giant robot game, but this one is different, I swear. The main difference is in the way you control your robot--not from a cockpit inside the robot's skull, or from a dynamic third-person perspective, but by remote control from the point of view of a human character on the ground.

This means you have to position your human character someplace where you can see the action (rooftops are good), but not so close that you get killed. This makes for some interesting strategic issues: when a battle rages from one end of the city to the other, you must decide if you should continue trying to control your robot, who has now become a distant figure on the horizon, or move your human character in for a closer look, temporarily leaving your robot helpless to defend itself. But the best part of the game’s human element is that, while in other giant robot games you eventually feel like the buildings are stage props and you are just some normal-sized guy in a metal suit, R.A.D. never loses its dramatic sense of scale. The heavy, lumbering movement of the robots also adds to the sense of realism. Each limb of your robot is controlled individually (R1 and L2 for the legs, left and right analog sticks for the arms), so every step you take is an earth-shaking, control-rumbling event.

The game's story and characters (designed by Toshihiro Kawamoto, creator of Cowboy Bebop) are very much in the style of Japanese anime, which is good or bad depending on how you feel about science fiction melodramas with soft-voiced, big-eyed teenage orphans.

Here are the only really annoying features of the game: 1) though you can fast-forward through each individual line of dialogue, it's impossible to skip it altogether, even if you've heard it 10 times, and 2) the action is often interrupted with pointless communications from "headquarters." Despite a few design flaws, though, this is a fun game that finally puts the "giant" back into giant robots. --David Stoesz

Pros:

  • Interesting strategic elements introduced by the remote-control system
  • Dramatic sense of scale
  • Fun, lumbering combat
  • Sweet, charming characters
Cons:
  • Impossible to skip cutscenes and dialogue
  • Too many interruptions
  • Excessive load times

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Ultimate MECH-ROMP!! March 19, 2003
By J W
Don't listen to the other review whatever you do, becuase if you do you would have missed out on the greatest mech game yet. The game as you probably know is just plain revolutionary. It uses the analog sticks to control the arms, and the L and R Buttons to control the legs, while giving you the perspective of the young man or woman that you play. There are three Mecha Robots, each with alternate modes, and as a bonus you can also play Almost every other monster etc. after you have beaten it. The game did have some uneven diffuculty, but if you are of the elite mecha robot fans, you will take to the controls after a few missions. Being able to skip the cinemas and transmissions would have been nice, but you may fast-forward. The voice-acting and dialogue is mostly horrible, but it was done to capture the Japanese dubbing of The older Japanese Giant-Robot films. The graphics for people and mechs are great, the mechs are the best I have seen in a game, EAT THAT X BOX j/k however the surroundings could have used some work as they look sort of plain sometimes and the tries are a little pop-uppy, but it's all good. I love this game, I did from the first play of the demo at Sam Goody, buy this game, love the game, love it for it's flaws and pros. Do it for yourself or one you love!!!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars fun versus mode, slow story mode December 9, 2002
Verified Purchase
Upon playing RAD for the first time, my brother and I immediately started "versus" mode and had an absolute blast...we each controlled huge, lumbering robots and tried our best to beat the pulp out of one another. We quickly learned, however, that our fighting skills were only half the battle. You see, your viewpoint of the fighting is from that of a little character running around the city...you're character is supposedly "controlling" the robot. Getting a good vantage point of the battle is key...with buildings in your way and debris falling all over the place, keeping your little character out of harm's way can be quite tricky. And while you move your character to the best place available, your robot is completely vulnerable...so you have to manage two characters at once...it's a lot of hectic fun.
The "story mode" for this game, however, can be tough to endure. Long sequences of tangential, repetitive dialog that can't be skipped are intermixed with some long cut scenes and bad voice acting.
Having said that, I just completed the story mode and found that it got less annoying the farther I progressed through the game. There are 50+ episodes of robot battles and story, and though the in-game story has a lot of holes and irrelevant plot threads, it does get exciting about 2/3 of the way through, when your robot takes on a life of his own. It reminded me very much of GIANT ROBO and THE BIG O. Unfortunately, the plodding, unavoidable narrative of the story is the biggest drawback of the game. Minus one star, at least.
If you have someone to play against, this game will provide hours of a unique, robot fighting gameplay with original controls (I recommend going through the tutorial) and enjoyable interactivity. But if you're only going to play this in single player mode, you might want to rent it first. The fighting is still great, but the story you have to endure can be bothersome.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Frustratingly fun April 2, 2004
I've played a LOT of games, and have always found that the best games are the ones that make me so mad that I throw my controller across the room and smash it to pieces. I've repaired more controllers than I can count. However, R.A.D. makes me want to throw my controller for a different reason. Just as mention in the other reviews, the plot and mid-fight conversations are not only mind-numbing, but frustrating to no end. But to make it even worse, the voice actors are monotone, making the story even less interesting, and irritating to sit through (when forced to). One character in particular (Mika Banhara) is voiced by a Japanese woman, that basically screams monotone Engrish. It shatters the ears. My conclusion is that the actors were given a list of 1 to 10 word phrases to say, with no idea what they were talking about, and it came out all sorts of wrong. Characters screaming in agony can sound like a sigh of relief. The character Ellen falls victim to this constantly. The picture of the character will be blushing happily, while the voice actor is screaming angrily.
Besides all that stuff though, the game is a HUGE step forward in Mech games. I bought it expecting it to be something like Rampage for the Sega Master System. And the controls seemed intimidating at first. I've played all the levels, and still don't have complete control, but it's still a blast. the walking can get frustrating, and you really gotta be coordinated to navigate tight city streets. But the real cornerstone of this game is the Arm control. The anolog sticks provide control that takes very little thought. Whatever way you move the sticks is the way the arms move (to a degree). You can't to ANYTHING you want, but the difference between an uppercut and a jab don't require any real thought.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Assault Knuckle fire!! December 12, 2002
Robot Alchemic Drive (R.A.D.) is a fun, exciting, and revolutionary "Mecha" game. Why? Read on.
In R.A.D. you assume the role of a young "hero" who is called upon to pilot a "giant robot" to save the world from an invasion of alien "giant robots." You begin with simple training exercises, and proceed through missions that gradually increase in difficulty as you master the controls of your robot and use funds earned from defeating other robots to increase the abilities of your machine.
First, I will touch on what is bad about this game. The voice-overs are terrible. I am tempted to say they were done tongue-in-cheek to remind those of my generation of the terrible voice acting we saw in giant robot cartoons (Tranzor Z anyone?), but there is nothing to indicate that this is supposed to be funny. If the dialog were more over-the-top, as in Godzilla Destroy All Monsters Melee, that would be fine. As it is, it is just poorly done and very amateurish.
Another bad part is the constant interferance of plot elements into the game's action scenes. Nothing is more irritating when trying to move your hero or robot and you get stuck half-way through because an annoying pop-up box shows up to "keep you informed" on what is happening in the game. Bad idea. Keep the pop-up, but don't let it pause the action...
Finally, and most annoying, is that there is NO way to skip over plot scenes or FMV pieces. The best you can do is hold down START to speed them up, but even so, this is extremely irritating.
Having said that, once you get into the action, this game is incredible! The blurb on the box basically tells you that you will feel like you are in the game, and they are right.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars GREAT game at a great value
This game is so much fun! It arrived in good quality with no scratches. The game play definately takes getting used to but nothing that can't be overcome. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Krogers
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Giant Robot Game EVER!!!
RAD is Pacific Rim 2002, both are incredible, and both were criminally underrated, the controls for the Meganites were perfect, and seeing it from the eyes of the pilot on the... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Elee29
5.0 out of 5 stars Totally Awesome.
The whole game play is one to check out. Especially the whole mechanics on the gameplay control. You don't simply control a humongous robot, instead you control a character who in... Read more
Published 3 months ago by Frank
4.0 out of 5 stars Criminally underrated game
If I could describe this game in one word it would be EPIC.
Published 3 months ago by Boddicker
5.0 out of 5 stars Pacific Rim-like
I watched Pacific Rim and then heard about this game and thought
"Hey! That looks like Pacific Rim! Cool! Read more
Published 6 months ago by William Henley
5.0 out of 5 stars Radical and fun little game
This game is hilarious and serious at the same time. Real fun to play. It's frustrating at first because you're trying so hard not to touch or tap any of the buildings. Read more
Published 7 months ago by Gabriel Arthur Petrie
3.0 out of 5 stars Clunky Controls, Slow
This game has a cool concept and attention to detail. However the controls and viewpoints are just a little too bizarre to make a good game. Read more
Published 17 months ago by John Dandell
5.0 out of 5 stars The right blend of action and stupidity makes this game hilarious and...
The game-play is awesome.
The voice-acting and main story are so absurdly silly and poorly written that it's laughable. They reeeeally phoned in the voice acting. Read more
Published 20 months ago by JC
5.0 out of 5 stars The name of the game says it all.
While the graphics are out-dated, it's a PS2 game so duh. However, the controls and concept of this game is awesome! Read more
Published 21 months ago by Ailingforale
5.0 out of 5 stars A Forgotten Gem
One of the best games on PS2. Has an utterly unique control scheme that makes even the simple act of throwing a punch an arduous task -- so that when you pull it off, and send an... Read more
Published on November 17, 2012 by Brandon Carbaugh
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