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Robot Haiku: Poems for Humans to Read Until Their Robots Decide It's Kill Time Paperback – Bargain Price, January 14, 2011


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About the Author

Ray Salemi is a twenty-year veteran of the high-tech market, whose writing has appeared in BusinessWeek and Fast Company. He's never faced a robot uprising, but he's seen enough movies to know that he could take them (with Shia LaBeouf's help, of course). Salemi lives in Boston, MA.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Adams Media (January 14, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1440511977
  • ISBN-13: 978-1440511974
  • ASIN: B005MZBYEE
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 6.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,990,938 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Ray Salemi is a senior verification consultant with Mentor Graphics.

Salemi started his career in Electronic Design Automation with Gateway Design Automation, the inventors of Verilog. Since then he has worked for Cadence Design Systems, Sun Microsystems, and several startups.

Ray Salemi is the author of the popular introduction to simulation, FPGA SIMULATION.

Customer Reviews

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Bojan Tunguz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 4, 2011
Format: Paperback
Haiku is the ancient Japanese poetry form that consists of three phrases (lines) that total seventeen syllables. Despite these stringent minimalist constraints, the form allows for a lot of innovation and poetic expression. Over the years haiku has found its way to the western poets, and these have managed to imprint their own influence on it. Haiku seems to be especially adapted for today's texting and twittering forms of expression, and there have been books dedicated to these particular themes.

"Robot Haiku" is conceived as a collection of amusing and humorous haikus purportedly written by robots. There are a total of 184 haikus - one per page, which looks like a serious waste of space. To add to the liveliness of the pages they are illustrated either with industrial patterns or stylized images of robots. To add to the robot theme the fonts are also reminiscent of the early block computer fonts. All of these little tricks and gimmicks are amusing, but when it comes to the actual haikus they don't really cut it in the humor department. Many of the "jokes" are either too inane or they verge on the absurdist humor. Overall, in the whole book I have not come across a single haiku that even elicited a chuckle.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 10, 2011
Format: Paperback
Japanese haiku poetry is easily one of the most disciplined and difficult forms of literature, requiring exactly 17 moras (similar to syllables but not exactly) allowing the reader to experience a moment in nature within a season. Haiku is ...a bridge between the "here and now", and a "then and there" that feels just as real.
While "Robot Haiku" may not be exactly haiku in the Japanese sense, the bridge that author Ray Salemi creates in his short pieces is equally profound - the comparison of life to artificial life, and how one has become a part of the other.
Wile I enjoyed some of his pieces more than others,
(my favorite)
"droid makes sausages
Spicy new taste sensation.
Hey! Where is the cat?"
I have to say that there is an almost surreal interaction we have between our interpersonal lives and the ever encroaching liberties we give to computers and automation to make decision for us. Kind of reminiscent of "Colossus, The Forbin Project"
The book makes light of this trend and yet keeps us aware of its existence in our lives.
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Format: Paperback
I was given this book as a gift and am now on line getting it as xmas presents for some friends who would enjoy the humor. I'm not a big robot-teur, but definitely found myself laughing out loud. A great, fun read!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tilia Klebenov Jacobs on November 1, 2011
Format: Paperback
I don't know what inspired Ray Salemi to write an entire book of Haiku from the robot perspective, but the result is a sly, witty, and occasionally surreal foray into a previously unexplored genre. If you're looking for bite-sized poetry that makes you giggle, wince, and sometimes scratch your head, this slender volume is for you. If you're looking for the perfect gift for anyone with a bookshelf, get two copies and keep one for yourself.

--Tilia Klebenov Jacobs
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