Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part 2: Hiatus and Renewal, 1983-1996 (Springer Praxis Books) 2009th Edition

5 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0387789040
ISBN-10: 0387789049
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Trade in your item
Get a $3.10
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$20.69 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$31.65 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
40 New from $21.99 17 Used from $20.69
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Must-read books
A Brief History of Time
A Brief History of Time
A Brief History of Time
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part 2: Hiatus and Renewal, 1983-1996 (Springer Praxis Books)
  • +
  • Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part I: The Golden Age 1957-1982 (Springer Praxis Books)
  • +
  • Robotic Exploration of the Solar System, Part 3: The Modern Era 1997-2009 (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration)
Total price: $103.23
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

From the reviews:

“Robotic Exploration of the Solar System Part 2 Hiatus and Renewal 1983-1989 is the second book in this comprehensive series describing planetary (and interplanetary) space missions. It’s a hefty 535 pages packed with information. … The book describes all the missions in great detail from earliest proposals to last signal. … The illustrations complement the text very well. … All in all an outstanding book … .” (Jim Davis, Amazon, March, 2011)

“In this thick, heavy tome, Mr. Harland and co-author Paolo Ulivi turn their exceptional narrative skills, technical knowledge and attention to detail to the story of American, Soviet and European unmanned planetary missions … . the presentation of the material is outstanding. … I never found this volume to be at all boring. About 250 illustrations perfectly complement the text … and all of them clearly and usefully captioned. If you want to know something about unmanned planetary exploration, this is the book for you.” (Terry Sunday, Amazon, August, 2011)

“This is the second volume of a three-book series chronicling solar system exploration from the dawn of the space age to the present. The authors describe not only the missions themselves but also their design, management, and instrumentation and the political backdrop to the selection and execution of these missions … . the book covers two of the big successes of the period in question, the Magellan and Galileo missions. … an excellent book and an excellent series.” (Liftoff, Issue 260, November-December, 2010)

About the Author

The Second World War left among its many and painful heritages a new technology, ballistic missiles, that was to change the world, providing a way to carry into space instruments, satellites and probes that revolutionized science and technology.

Prior to launching artificial satellites, both the then Soviet Union and the United States developed more powerful intercontinental missiles with a range of thousands of miles. In the 1950s, the Soviets designed the huge 8K71 "Semiorka" (little seven, after the military designator R 7), a single staged rocket equipped with four large boosters and able to carry an heavy thermonuclear warhead to the continental US. In the USA, competition between the different armed forces prevailed, and the Army developed the medium range Redstone and Jupiter missiles, whilst the Air Force developed the Thor and two different ICBMs, Atlas and Titan and the Navy developed the Polaris submarine launched missiles.

The potential of all of these rockets to boost spacecraft were huge, but while in the Soviet Union it was decided to modify an 8K71 to carry a scientific payload into space, the United States decided that the Navy would develop a tiny new rocket called Vanguard, specifically designed for the task. This decision was to have grave repercussions: on 4 October 1957 the Soviet Union launched its PS-1 satellite, better known as Sputnik, which rocked the USA. This was compounded a month later by the launch of the PS-2, carrying the dog Laika. Following the explosion of the first Vanguard on December 6, the US Army then had the task to restore the American confidence by successfully carrying Explorer 1 into space on 1 February 1958 using themodified Redstone rocket called Juno 1. During the same year, the superpowers started working on new versions of their missiles able to carry small payloads to the Moon and, potentially, to the near planets. The space race had begun.

DAVID HARLAND is an expert on international law serving with the UN.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Springer Praxis Books
  • Paperback: 550 pages
  • Publisher: Praxis; 2009 edition (November 25, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0387789049
  • ISBN-13: 978-0387789040
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 1.3 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #947,029 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Terry Sunday TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 12, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you're familiar with the Springer/Praxis series of books on spaceflight history and technology, then "Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part 2--Hiatus and Renewal 1983-1996" needs no introduction. You already know what a superb series it is, with fine production values, well-made volumes designed to stand up to being read repeatedly, authoritative text and liberal use of black-and-white photos, line drawings, charts and tables. You also already know what a great job prolific contributor David M. Harland, and the other series authors, do in bringing space exploration to life.

If you're not familiar with the series or the authors, but are interested in the subject, then this is a great place to dig in. In this thick, heavy tome, Mr. Harland and co-author Paolo Ulivi turn their exceptional narrative skills, technical knowledge and attention to detail to the story of American, Soviet and European unmanned planetary missions during a pivotal time when shock waves from the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy reverberated through much of the global spaceflight community. Despite the resulting uncertainties, and the need to redesign missions and spacecraft when the Shuttle fleet was grounded and then operationally restricted after it returned to flight status, the period saw many of the most impressive planetary missions to date. The first section of about 140 pages (labeled as Chapter 4 because it continues from "Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part I: The Golden Age, 1957-1982") covers in great detail the many international missions to Halley's Comet, taking advantage of an observational and scientific opportunity that occurs only once every 76 years.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Robotic Exploration of the Solar System Part 2 Hiatus and Renewal 1983-1989 is the second book in this comprehensive series describing planetary (and interplanetary) space missions. It's a hefty 535 pages packed with information. A glance at the long list of references will quell any doubts about whether the authors did their homework.

Where the first book in the series covered dozens and dozens of missions in the so called Golden Age this book describes only 19. The decline was due to the priorities given to the Shuttle and Space Station in the US while the USSR was in a terminal decline. Partially filling in the void were the emergence of the ESA and Japan in the planetary field.

The book describes all the missions in great detail from earliest proposals to last signal. The Galileo mission in particular is an orbit by orbit, encounter by encounter description lasting over a hundred pages. Not only are the flown missions described but the greater context of proposals and cancelled missions are provided.

This is not a book for the space tyro; there is very little in the way of explanations of scientific and technical matters. The wide variety of the instruments these probes carried and experiments performed will include some that even the most dedicated and long standing will not fully understand.

The illustrations complement the text very well. The only complaint is that there are no color illustrations in the book and the originals of some graphs and charts required color to fully understand them.

While not strictly necessary, I would strongly urge reading Part 1 before reading this book. While the authors seem to have picked as good a division as possible there is a certain loss of continuity if Part 1 is not read first.

All in all an outstanding book; I can't wait for Part 3.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
By far this is the best book series I have read on planetary science. It gives you a description of the spacecraft and the mission and the outputs of said mission. My quips have more to do with things that the authors were not able to know at the time of publication (2009), such as that Ulysses was not contacted in 2013 or that Russia did try to launch another planetary mission after Mars 96, Phobos Grunt. It has the nest description I have seen for Galileo or Magellan
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent explanation of robotics use in recent space exploration missions. Includes considerations of how the robot will function in the environment it will be going to as well as how they actually performed upon arrival at the destination. The book includes technical information but can be understood by the reader.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fantastic book. Excellent information. The robotic exploration of the solar system is one of the most interesting topic in modern science and technology because it involves politics, science, risk and exploration of new worlds, plus many amazing discoveries. It is absolutely fascinating and emotive. I have read many books about unmanned science exploration and this –and also part one– is very well written and structured.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part 2: Hiatus and Renewal, 1983-1996 (Springer Praxis Books)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part 2: Hiatus and Renewal, 1983-1996 (Springer Praxis Books)