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Robotic Exploration of the Solar System, Part 3: The Modern Era 1997-2009 (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration) Paperback – August 13, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0387096278 ISBN-10: 0387096272 Edition: 2012th

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Robotic Exploration of the Solar System, Part 3: The Modern Era 1997-2009 (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration) + Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part 2: Hiatus and Renewal, 1983-1996 (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration) + Robotic Exploration of the Solar System: Part I: The Golden Age 1957-1982 (Springer Praxis Books / Space Exploration)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Praxis; 2012 edition (August 13, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0387096272
  • ISBN-13: 978-0387096278
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 1.1 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #711,904 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

From the reviews:

Selected by Choice magazine as an "Outstanding Academic Title" for 2013

“Ulivi and Harland remedy this by providing rich, detailed overviews of Cassini, the Spirit and Opportunity rovers, and a number of less-well-known missions, such as Stardust. … The book features many illustrations, including images from the missions themselves, diagrams of the trajectories followed, and schematics of the spacecraft. … The book is well-researched and documented and is essential reading for anyone with an interest in the exploration of Earth’s solar system. … Summing Up: Essential. All space history collections.” (C. Palma, Choice, Vol. 50 (7), March, 2013)

From the Back Cover

In Robotic Exploration of the Solar System, Paolo Ulivi and David Harland provide a comprehensive account of the design and managment of deep-space missions, the spacecraft involved - some flown, others not - their instruments, and their scientific results.

This third volume in the series covers launches in the period 1997 to 2003 and features:

- a chapter entirely devoted to the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn;

- coverage of planetary missions of the period, including the Deep Space 1 mission and the Stardust and Hayabusa sample returns from comets and asteroids;

- extensive coverage of Mars exploration, the failed 1999 missions, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, and the twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity.

The story will continue in Part 4.


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By James Knapper on September 9, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It was a long time coming after volume 2, but this book doesn't disappoint! This is not a book just about NASA missions, but also includes missions from other countries such as those from Europe, Japan and India. Many of the more recent missions are covered in detail I have never seen in book-form before. For example, the Cassini mission has an entire section devoted to it. This section goes all the way back to the early 70s planning for a Saturn orbiter and probe through the plans for the mission through 2017. The Mars rovers are covered through Spirit's last move and Opportunities continuing mission. There is also a section on the Hayabussa mission which covers the mission in its entirety. The book also covers missions that were not successful such as the Mars Polar Lander. Many books skip over coverage for failed missions, but I love to read about what could have been, as well as what was learned from failures. The photographs in this book are amazing as well (many I have never seen before, and I have several books on the subject). This is a must have for anyone who is interested in solar system exploration. I can't wait for volume 4 to come out next!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Haubrechts Patrick on November 10, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is the 3rd volume of a series spanning from 1957 to 2003 as of today. This series is aimed at those interested with details of the design and the completion of the robotic deep space missions. For those having already the volumes 1 and 2, it is a logical continuation. The volume 3 spends around 190 pages on the Cassini mission, with a great emphasis on scientific experiments and their results. This must be compared with the book from Harlan, `Cassini at Saturn', which is dedicated exclusively to this mission, but was published in 2007, instead of 2011 for this volume. As far as the Cassini mission description, there is a lot in common between the two books, but one can see each other as complementary. There are many pictures, unfortunately, all in black and white, nevertheless extremely interesting. The book continues with Deepspace 1, Stardust, and many others landmarks such as the Martian missions till 2003. As in the other volumes, the authors spend some time on the genesis of the projects, design tradeoffs and the solution adopted. Also a lot of detailed references are given for each chapter. An excellent book, and I am looking forward for the volume 4.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jim Davis on March 31, 2013
Format: Paperback
Robotic Exploration of the Solar System, Part 3, Wows and Woes 1997-2003 continues seamlessly from the previous volume. As its subtitle hints, the book covers in depth spacecraft launched beyond the Earth-Moon system in the 7 years 1997-2003 inclusive.

The book is divided into three chapters. The first chapter covers the outstandingly successful Cassini-Huygens mission from conception to the present with a summary of future activities (the mission is still ongoing). The mission is covered in great detail through the first 200 pages. While one might expect that Titan encounter after Titan encounter would tend to get very repetitive after a while the author recognizes the difficulty and makes each encounter as fresh as possible. He largely succeeds.

Next, we have about 90 pages devoted to the asteroid and comet missions undertaken during this period, not only the ones flown but the ones planned as well. Both successful as well as failures are documented meticulously.

The final 180 page chapter is devoted to the plethora of Mars missions planned and flown during this period with pride of place being given to the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, the latter which is still in service.

Throughout the book illustrations are very well chosen. The spacecraft are illustrated usually with line drawings as well as detailed photographs. Some of the more complex multiple encounters are well illustrated with drawings. The traverses of Spirit and Opportunity are also well illustrated. If a particularly interesting planetary feature is mentioned in the text it is invariably accompanied by a photograph. There are only two complaints to be made. One is the lack of color but the internet adequately covers that base.
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