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Dr. Rob's Guide to Raising Fit Kids: A Family-Centered Approach to Achieving Optimal Health Paperback – July 15, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: DiaMedica (July 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979356431
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979356438
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,319,353 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Robert S. Gotlin is the Director of Orthopaedic and Sports Rehabilitation in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. His practice includes orthopaedic, sports, and spine rehabilitation.

Dr. Gotlin frequently appears on radio, television and in print. He hosts The Dr. Rob Says…Sports Health and Fitness Show, which airs every Saturday morning on 1050 ESPN Radio. The show reviews health related topics and offer expertise on sports and fitness-related issues. In particular, controversial topics related to youth sports and youth development are detailed with point-counterpoint discussions among listeners and select experts. He has been guest host for television’s ABC Now - Healthy Living, a daily television program that features breaking medical news and practical health advice.

He has served on the medical team for the New York Knickerbockers (NBA Basketball) the New York Liberty (WNBA Basketball), and consulted for the the New York Yankees (MLB Baseball) and New Jersey Nets (NBA Basketball). He is the Team Physician for the Harlem Wizards Basketball team and a member of the medical team for Woman’s Rugby, U.S National Team. He is the father of three; coaches’ several youth sports teams, and is the medical liaison to several youth sports organizations. His opinion is internationally sought on several topics, including but not limited to equipment design, safety precautions, and athletic skill development. Dr. Gotlin volunteers’ countless hours working with children age 13-16 teaching sportsmanship, community values, and fostering athletic excellence.

Customer Reviews

Overall I thought this was a very good book with a lot of useful information.
Amazon Customer
Healthy diet for active lifestyles is substantially covered as well, in simple, basic terms with specific examples and sample menus and choices.
Amazon Customer
There is an indication that an index will be included in the completed version of this book.
L M Bell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Allison R. King on July 14, 2008
Format: Paperback
"Dr. Rob's Guide to Raising Fit Kids" seems more of an attempt to get kids to play sports, then to actually get fit. I wanted to like this book and do to some extent, but it was more focused on team sports then exercise. A majority of kids do not play team/individual sports because of the cost issues, so the majority of the book wouldn't help most kids. Also, over half the book deals with meal plans and recipes which seems a bit overboard (he could have used this space for more content). Dr. Gotlin does a good job explaining to parents how to get their kids involved in sports and how to deal with injuries. His style of writing made the book easy to read and understand. Maybe it was the `name' of the book that gave me the impression of a more `fitness' book for kids to help get them outside and away from inside gaming! If your kids are in to sports I would say read the book. If you're looking for a more fitness oriented book to guide you, I would pass on this one.

Advanced reader copy received from Res Marketing Alliance
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By A. Kim on June 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
When I picked up this book, I was under the impression I would be getting information on how to raise fit kids - all ages, all kinds of fitness. However while this book included a small amount of information that would benefit parents of all children, it was very much geared toward the sports playing 6-11 year old set.
Chapters 1-2 give a general overview of the childhood obesity epidemic and some things you can do to build fitness habits into your children. Also included are some basic exercises for children.
Chapter 3 starts the focus on sports for 6-11 year olds. There is a basic overview of the different ages and what skills they may have as well as the parent's role at that time.
Chapter 4 goes over sports equipment and how to choose what is best for your child. I would think if you have a child in sports this would be a very helpful chapter.
Chapter 5 goes over the parent coach relationship. Dr. Rob is a coach and a parent so he is able to speak from both sides.
Chapter 6 goes over safety in sports and also addresses specific injuries and how to handle them. Helpful information for anyone.
Chapter 7 is a short talk on alcohol and drugs.
Chapter 8-9 go into some menu plans and a few recipes. The plans each have a sports title such as Home Run Breakfast to encourage your children to eat healthful food. Not sure if this will actually work or not, not having a sports-obsessed child myself.
The last couple chapters are a Q&A with Dr. Rob and some resources.
I think that if you do have a child 6-11 years old who plays or is interested in sports, that this will be a very useful and helpful book for you. If you don't have a child that falls into that category, while this was an interesting book, I would not recommend it for you.
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By M. Poush on April 29, 2008
Format: Paperback
I was interested in reviewing this book for LibraryThing's Early Reviewers program because I am a mother who has herself struggled with obesity. Having not been raised in a fit family, I am very interested in tips on how to convey to my children the joy I am increasingly finding in being active and eating well. This book aims to give many of the tips needed to do that successfully: "Dr. Rob's Guide to Raising Fit Kids emphasizes that fitness in children is a family issue, and that it's not just about food--it's about how kids and their families spend their time."

The information presented in the book is accurate as far as it goes. However, the organization and editing are all over the place, making it hard to extract the information the book does contain. It leaves gaping holes in the topics it purports to cover, and the paragraphs in any particular section bounce around in subject matter so much that it is easy to wonder if you accidentally turned too many pages.

The problems begin with the first page of chapter one. The opening paragraph talks about today's family lifestyle: "Are you always on the run? Rushing from a hockey game to a school play to a quick dinner? Hurrying to get something out of the fridge and into the microwave?"

From this, the author concludes that we live in a "sit-down society." Huh?

Similar leaps in logic and train of thought are common throughout the rest of the book. While they may be valid conclusions, a lot of the intermediate reasoning or facts are left out.

Subheadings in the chapters often don't fit the content. For example, the section under subheading "Fitness Is Not Only for Children" contains text examining how body image is low among overweight children.
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Format: Paperback
Dr. Rob's Guide to Raising Fit Kids by Dr. Robert S. Gotlin.
Overall I thought this was a very good book with a lot of useful information. In first chapter, Fitness is a family affair, Dr. Rob states, "Our sit-down lifestyle often leads to obesity, which has the potential to kill us and our children. "The American lifestyle is toxic." (Pg. 7) I really appreciated Dr. Rob's perspective that if we are to have fit and healthy kids, we have to do it as a family - parents must model the behavior changes they want to see in their children. We home school our two children and physical fitness is definitely a family issue for us. The book is full of excellent ideas and suggestions, along with helpful information about safety and necessary equipment for different sports. I do have a few criticisms, though. One is that his section on caloric requirements for children and the meal plans are a little too complex for the average reader and do not correspond to each other. If the average calorie requirement for a 9 to 13 year old boy is 2,600, then why do most of the meal plans for active, athletic children playing basketball, baseball, Lacrosse, soccer, track and field, etc, have only 1,200 to 1,800 calories? That just doesn't add up. Otherwise, I really appreciated the important information on things such as; how to correctly fit athletic shoes, how to avoid common injuries and the glycemic index and protein gram charts. Altogether, a worthwhile book if you don't mind getting out your calculator to adjust the meal plans for your own kids and family.
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