Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.99
  • Save: $1.50 (9%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Rock My Soul: Black Peopl... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good - Standard used condition book with the text inside being clean and unmarked - Exterior of the book shows moderate signs of usage
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem Paperback – January 6, 2004

14 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.49
$4.99 $2.99
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$2,342.74

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$14.49 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem + Salvation: Black People and Love + The Will to Change: Men, Masculinity, and Love
Price for all three: $41.13

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Prolific cultural commentator hooks (Communion) returns with another timely, provocative book on a thorny issue currently being debated in the black community. While popular books by black conservatives place the lack of significant social progress squarely on the shoulders of African-Americans, hooks cleverly repositions the argument, stating articulately that the symptoms of the stagnation (e.g., violence, self-sabotage, malaise and symbolic suicide) are old challenges only intensified by ongoing government neglect, racism, psychological trauma and patriarchy. In typical hooks fashion, she employs diverse sources to provide support for her penetrating, frank views on the troubles that often block blacks from achieving healthy self-esteem. While she admits the power of white racism has lessened, she believes the transition from rigid segregation toward full integration has resulted in crippling emotional and psychological trauma, breeding fear, paranoia, self-hatred, self-doubt and addiction as blacks try to emulate whites and compete in the workplace. Her take on how revised mental health approaches can ease some of these ills is worthwhile and informative. Despite a tendency to repeat some key points, hooks is especially effective when she addresses the devastating toll of low self-esteem and self-hate on black women and families, linking much of the damage to traditional and religious values. With each new book, hooks is deeply exploring the inner terrain of the black community, calling for a return to sound values, self-love and commonsense solutions while seeking new ways to cope with a modern world gone slightly mad. Overall, this is one of hooks's best efforts in recent years.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

This is a passionate examination of the role self-esteem plays in the lives of African Americans, who, insists cultural critic hooks (Salvation), have been unable to address this issue openly as a crisis. She shows how historical movements for racial uplift have fallen short in this area and identifies the political and cultural barriers that keep blacks from emotional well-being.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Washington Square Press (January 6, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743456068
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743456067
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #426,498 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Bell Hooks is a cultural critic, feminist theorist, and writer. Celebrated as one of our nation's leading public intellectual by The Atlantic Monthly, as well as one of Utne Reader's 100 Visionaries Who Could Change Your Life, she is a charismatic speaker who divides her time among teaching, writing, and lecturing around the world. Previously a professor in the English departments at Yale University and Oberlin College, hooks is now a Distinguished Professor of English at City College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She is the author of more than seventeen books, including All About Love: New Visions; Remembered Rapture: The Writer at Work; Wounds of Passion: A Writing Life; Bone Black: Memories of Girlhood; Killing Rage: Ending Racism; Art on My Mind: Visual Politics; and Breaking Bread: Insurgent Black Intellectual Life. She lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Alvin C. Romer on April 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover
ROCK MY SOUL: BLACK PEOPLE AND SELF-ESTEEM By bell hooks
Lest we forget the importance of feeling good about ourselves, bell hooks, the quintessential black feminist writer has added yet another tome to the many outstanding references to the literary canon of African-American culture. Here, she gives us Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem. No less provocative, but ever so poignant, the panache is intact as she talks with passion on a highly debated topic that is always at the cutting edge of discussion in our communities. There's no book that this author has contributed that doesn't get the overall treatment with candid and insightful analogy. Self esteem and what it means to people of color will always be high profile and a force to be reckoned with due to the scars of slavery and unbalanced scales . Without self-esteem everyone loses his or her sense of meaning, purpose, and power. For too long, African Americans in particular have been unable to openly and honestly address the crisis of self-esteem and how it affects the way they perceive themselves and are perceived by others.
In her most challenging and provocative book to date, bell hooks gives voice to what many black people have thought and felt, but seldom articulated in a way where doubt would hold sway. She offers readers a clear, passionate examination of the role of projecting positive images and having the confidence to allow the playing field to be equaled to play in the African-American experience. This is essential in determining whether success is individual or collective. In gathering research for the project, the author delves into the methods and reasons why she used the paradigms to construct this project.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Alvin C. Romer on May 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Lest we forget the importance of feeling good about ourselves, bell hooks, the quintessential black feminist writer has added yet another tome to the many outstanding references to the literary canon of African-American culture. Here, she gives us Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem. No less provocative, but ever so poignant, the panache is intact as she talks with passion on a highly debated topic that is always at the cutting edge of discussion in our communities. There's no book that this author has contributed that doesn't get the overall treatment with candid and insightful analogy. Self esteem and what it means to people of color will always be high profile and a force to be reckoned with due to the scars of slavery and unbalanced scales . Without self-esteem everyone loses his or her sense of meaning, purpose, and power. For too long, African Americans in particular have been unable to openly and honestly address the crisis of self-esteem and how it affects the way they perceive themselves and are perceived by others.
In her most challenging and provocative book to date, bell hooks gives voice to what many black people have thought and felt, but seldom articulated in a way where doubt would hold sway. She offers readers a clear, passionate examination of the role of projecting positive images and having the confidence to allow the playing field to be equaled to play in the African-American experience. This is essential in determining whether success is individual or collective. In gathering research for the project, the author delves into the methods and reasons why she used the paradigms to construct this project.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers on May 2, 2003
Format: Hardcover
ROCK MY SOUL: BLACK PEOPLE AND SELF-ESTEEM by bell hooks is a detailed
analysis of self image issues in African-Americans. Ms. hooks examines the
dynamics which have oppressed the development of a healthy sense of self in
African-Americans. A history of enslavement, the belittling of racial worth,
and internalized racism were a few of the phenomenon cited by hooks as a cause
of the pervasive lack of self esteem in Black people.
While hooks provides interesting discourse on the subject matter, she often
comes off sounding like a text book in her discussion of the different sides
of this issue. As such, this is not a casual read or a self help book. It is
an informative, thought-provoking, volume with historical and psychological
references that provides food for thought and information for further study
among those interested in this subject matter.
Reviewed by Diane Marbury (HonestD)
The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
hooks continues her path down the self-help genre with this latest book about black people and self-esteem. hooks posits that for several decades black people have pointed to racism as their only barrier at the expense of examining personal matters like the loss of self-esteem. In this text, she tries to find a middle ground in which racism is acknowledged but low self-esteem is addressed. Unfortunately, assessing racism takes up so much of the text that many readers may completely forget the message about self-esteem. Further, while hooks affectively points to where black self-esteem is lacking, she says very little about how it can be regained.
In so many ways, hooks is beating a dying horse. Her book Salvation could have been attached to her book All about Love and Rock My Sould could have been attached to Salvation. Whereas in her love books, she clearly spells out the definition of love and emphasizes love in every chapter, here self-esteem gets lost in the mix and is given charecteristics but never concretely defined.
hooks loves patting herself on the back for being able to talk about race, class, and gender simultaneously. In this book, her love of male heroes Malcolm X and Dr. King shines through. Though consistently pro-black, in this book hooks actually praises whites for their resistance to sexism and rigid gender roles and condemns blacks for embracing those two oppressions. Still, hooks uses kid gloves when critiquing McWhorter and other black conservatives in contrast to her complete trashing of Wolf, Roiphe, and Paglia in her book Outlaw Culture.
hooks is great at summarizing black history. She re-illustrates how thoroughly and widely she reads.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem
This item: Rock My Soul: Black People and Self-Esteem
Price: $14.49
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: &