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Roman Military Clothing (1): 100 BC-AD 200 (Men-at-Arms) (Vol 1) Paperback – August 19, 2002


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Roman Military Clothing (1): 100 BC-AD 200 (Men-at-Arms) (Vol 1) + Roman Military Clothing (3): AD 400-640 (Men-at-Arms) (v. 3)
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Product Details

  • Series: Men-at-Arms (Book 374)
  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (August 19, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841764876
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841764870
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 7.2 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #853,094 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Packed with specially commissioned artwork, maps and diagrams, the Men-at-Arms series is an unrivalled illustrated reference on the history, organisation, uniforms and equipment of the world's military forces, past and present.

About the Author

GRAHAM SUMNER, who both wrote and illustrated this book, was born in 1958 and studied illustration at Wrexham Art School. He has specialised in archaeological reconstruction drawings; and has been involved with the Ermine Street Guard - the Roman experimental history group - for nearly 20 years. He has published a number of articles on the Roman army, and was the author of the popular Roman Army: Wars of the Empire (Brasseys). This is his first book for Osprey.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 1, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book has interesting reviews at Roman Army Talk. I liked the book but some will not agree with some of the tunic color theory. The book is really helpful for those who want to build an authentic re-enactor outfit, including information on the different styles of military shoes! The information about tunic construction and cloak types is invaluable. The color plates are nice, and realistic looking, while the line drawings and B&W illustrations are very good supporting materials. It is wonderful that this information is being made available in this format, and further volumes will follow!
If you study Romans, the Roman Army, or re-enact this time period you will want this resource close at hand. Even miniatures painters can benefit from the information presented.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By David S. Michaels on December 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
Having using this book as a resource for more than a year now, I have come to appreciate its value to the Roman reenactor, wargamer, and professional or amateur historian. After spending time going over the text in detail, I can only appreciate and admire the amount of painstaking research Mr. Sumner has compiled for this study. I admit to being a little miffed, initially, that Sumner did not once and for all end the vexing argument over the color of the Roman military tunic -- i.e. was it red, or white, or some other color, or was there no "uniform" color at all? In retrospect, if one reads between the lines, the evidence Mr. Sumner provides seems to advance the hypothesis that the Roman soldier wore a white tunic while "out of kit," and a red one under his armor when preparing for battle. The illustrations are quite nicely rendered, with an extraordinary amount of detail even by Osprey standards. In conclusion, this is definitely a worthwhile addition to the Roman military enthusiast's or reenactor's bookshelf.
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
Mr. David S. Michaels,
Forgive me, but Your review about the book "Roman military clothing nr. 1" gives the impression of a very superficial and approximate knowledge of the Roman military word, archaeology and way of life.
Roman paintings, mosaics and sculptures provide us with a snapshot of the past as one can easily observe from the black and white images of soldiers in this book. Unfortunately we too often presume to know more than the people who lived 2000 years ago who saw these soldiers for themselves.
For instance the Praetorian guardsman illustrated in Plate F1 may at first seem fanciful and dubious but in my opinion this is one the best reconstructions of a Praetorian ever attempted. Every detail of the equipment is based on actual archaeological sources including the original Neronian painting where even the hinges of the lorica are visible! For example the helmet can be seen in the definitive publication on the Armour of Imperial Rome by H. Russell Robinson, the greaves from Pompeii and the bronze Lorica segmentata is based on recently discovered bronze specimens from Nova, Bulgaria. Linking the Praetorian with the Prasina faction in the circus with the inclusion of a green tunic adds a touch of historical realism. Moreover this link, attested by ancient written sources, confirmed by other artistical images, reminds us that the personal tastes of both Praetorians and Emperors existed in an age where modern concepts of uniform did not exist.
The black and white illustrations in this publication are a mine of information and many are made available for the general reader for the first time. These include a unique representation of a slave merchant and a Diogmitas or Para-military policeman of Asia minor.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Splendid work. Author shows his expertise on the subject. Well researched, easy to read, and well written. A must for uniformologists, reenactors , miniature wargamers and antiquarians. As an historian, a military man and a miniature wargamer this work has special meaning for me.
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