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The Roman World 44 BC-AD 180 (The Routledge History of the Ancient World) Hardcover – August 28, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0415049696 ISBN-10: 0415049695 Edition: 0th

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Product Details

  • Series: The Routledge History of the Ancient World
  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (August 28, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415049695
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415049696
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,330,104 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Martin Goodman is positioned at the Oriental Institute, Oxford. He has written numerous books, including The Ruling Class of Judaea (1987), State and Society in Roman Galilee (1983) and contributed to The History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ (1986).

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Reader on December 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is an insightful summary of the Roman empire, and the way it worked. Professor Goodman's analysis of the underlying power structure of the empire and how the subjects persuaded themselves to accept what today we would call a military dictatorship is compelling, and contains insights for our own time. For example, a) just why did the Romans need such a large army anyway ? b) why would anyone want to be a senator, when it's the emperor who calls all the shots ?
If you want to know the answers, but this book.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By E. Jenkinson on July 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
I originally bought this book back in about 2000 or so, and decided this summer to finally read it - wow, am I glad I did. It is as some have commented, a work with many names, and references - but does come with a Notes section at the end, so you can look up all the information as you go along. I think that the book is well written, and gives a nice topographical view of the Roman world from 44BC - the death of J. Caesar to 180AD the advent of Commodus (if you saw Gladiator, you know who he is). It's coverage of the whole Roman Empire, into economical, religious, and society is quite riveting, and well thought out. It is not a difficult book to read, and has short chapters, with headings for each section - this will make it easier for you to read, and follow along.
He uses archaeological, and written sources, and does this quite well. I wholly recommend this book, and think most will find it good to read.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Pen Name on June 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book was easy to read and to follow, had a number of helpful illustration and provided an fair amount of information pertaining to the foundation of the Empire and the running of both Rome and the provinces. While this book would be excellent for novices in the field of Roman antiquity, it was not an adequate read for any student of the ancient world. The lives of emperors were summed up in a few pages (usually around 2-5, some as short as 1/2 of a page), the governing of the country was presented in a superficial manner, and the general history was bland and without depth. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to learn the 'basics' of the Roman Empire, however, more serious scholars should look elsewhere.
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Eve B. on March 23, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is good if you are only looking for a summary of the Roman economy, military, religions, etc. To get a better overall view of Roman, or any other Western history, though, I highly recommend the various collaboration efforts of Professor John Reich.
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