Buy New
$14.46
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $3.49 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Rome's Enemies (1): Germanics and Dacians (Men at Arms Series, 129) Paperback


Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.46
$8.35 $7.18

Frequently Bought Together

Rome's Enemies (1): Germanics and Dacians (Men at Arms Series, 129) + Rome's Enemies (2): Gallic and British Celts (Men-at-Arms) + Saxon, Viking and Norman (Men at Arms Series, 85)
Price for all three: $42.90

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Series: Men-at-Arms
  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (November 25, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0850454735
  • ISBN-13: 978-0850454734
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.2 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #505,731 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Packed with specially commissioned artwork, maps and diagrams, the Men-at-Arms series is an unrivalled illustrated reference on the history, organisation, uniforms and equipment of the world's military forces, past and present.

About the Author

Peter Wilcox has written numerous articles on Ancient civilisations, and has also authored numerous Osprey Ancient Warfare titles.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Erik Muller on December 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
Being a junior History buff, I looked into this book, interested in learning a little more about the traditional enemies (and allies) of Rome. This book wasn't too awfully dissapointing, but it wasn't all that great either, hence the 4 stars.

For one, there was a decisive lack of Dacians in this book. There was 1 Illustation for the Dacians (the cover illustration), and about a page and a half about them. Indeed, even with the Germans, there is a woefully short amount of imformation about THEM. The couple pages of historical quotes about them and their bearing in battle was interesting, but other than that, there was hardly anything of substance about these two people.

One thing though - if you are interested in Germanic and Dacians Standards, swords, axes, or shields, get this book. Half of the book, quite literally, is about the evolution of weapons and armor, their exact sizes, their shapes, etc. I did find this part helpful, since my father is in to weapons-making, especially archaic weapons. Using the diagrams in this book, we made 2 Franciscas, which came out quite nicely made.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By K. Murphy on April 1, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book touches on most of Rome's major barbarians, Early Germans, Suebian/Marcomannic tribes, Goths, Franks, Anglo-Saxons, and Dacians, and also provides some information on the contemporary Gauls, Sarmatians, and Huns. As a previous reviewer has noted, the Dacians, one of the most exciting peoples of Ancient Eastern Europe, only get about two pages and one plate, when they really deserve their own men-at-arms title. The plates are some of G A Embleton's better and are finely detailed. I suppose this book captures the whole point of the men-at-arms, giving a brief overview of the subject's history and appearance, and thus laying the foundation for the reader to pursue a deeper knowledge of the subject.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By David A. Howarth on May 25, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For the book itself, 5 stars, for this particular (PoD) printing, 2 stars. Excellent, compendious semi-scholarly coverage of an interesting topic, with great illustrations. BUT, Osprey has evidently shifted the production of all of its titles to Print on Demand, and it shows. While the printing and quality of the materials seem comparable (e.g., I cannot discern much difference in the art plates, even), whatever process they use for the bindings is NOT. I have owned a handful of older Osprey Men-at-arms books for years, and they are rock solid. I've received four Print-on-Demand Osprey books in the last week, and two of the ALREADY SHOW SIGNS OF FALLING APART. Not cool, Osprey. Selecting out PoD titles in the search criteria needs to be a priority, Amazon. Some of us can tell, and at very least you owe it to us to inform...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search
ARRAY(0xa8b1fc84)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?