Ron Paul vs. Paul Krugman and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$8.09
Qty:1
  • List Price: $8.99
  • Save: $0.90 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Ron Paul vs. Paul Krugman: Austrian vs. Keynesian economics in the financial crisis Paperback – April 1, 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.09
$6.20 $5.50

Frequently Bought Together

Ron Paul vs. Paul Krugman: Austrian vs. Keynesian economics in the financial crisis + Dirty Wars: The World Is A Battlefield
Price for both: $27.85

Buy the selected items together
  • Dirty Wars: The World Is A Battlefield $19.76

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $1.99 (Save 60%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1470070723
  • ISBN-13: 978-1470070724
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #778,898 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Any work of economics that can make you laugh is at least worth a look. If in less than 100 pages it also informs you about a subject of great importance, it might just qualify as a must-read.

"Jeremy Hammond, a political journalist self-taught in economics and a writer of rare skill, has produced such a book." -- Gene Epstein, Barron's

"The reader does not have to be highly knowledgeable about the world of economic theory to understand Ron Paul vs. Paul Krugman. Clearly written, and with an obvious and well supported perspective..." -- Jim Miles, Foreign Policy Journal

About the Author

Jeremy R. Hammond is an independent political analyst and recipient of the Project Censored Award for Outstanding Investigative Journalism. He is the founder and editor of ForeignPolicyJournal.com and can also be found on the web at JeremyRHammond.com. He is the author of Ron Paul vs. Paul Krugman: Austrian vs. Keynesian economics in the financial crisis and The Rejection of Palestinian Self-Determination: The Struggle for Palestine and the Roots of the Israeli-Arab Conflict. His forthcoming book is on the contemporary U.S. role in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

More About the Author

Jeremy R. Hammond is an independent political analyst and recipient of the Project Censored Award for Outstanding Investigative Journalism. He is the founding editor of Foreign Policy Journal (www.foreignpolicyjournal.com) and may also be found on the web at JeremyRHammond.com.

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Roger Smith on December 10, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This book is mis-titled. It should be called "Why Paul Krugman Is A Moron," since the book's little more than a case of the author hurling the kitchen sink at Paul Krugman's head. Not that there's anything wrong with criticism, but when you're comparing one economic writer to another, the fair thing to do is accurately summarize the views, qualifications, and successes and failures of both. In this book, Ron Paul never errs, Krugman never gets it right, and as for qualifications, Paul, a Republican Congressman (what better claim to intellectual distinction?), has it all over dummy Krugman, whom, as we never learn from the author, is merely professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton University, the Ford International Professor of Economics at MIT, and 2008 winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics. Clearly a dope!

The author seems to regard the Austrian School's theory of business cycles, Paul's particular obsession, as close to absolute truth as one gets. This theory holds that economic bubbles arise from government artificially boosting the money supply. This leads to over-investment and 'malinvestment' and a quick boom, but is always followed by a nasty crash. Krugman disagrees (so, incidentally did super-capitalist Milton Friedman, who in 1969 pointed out that the theory is just not consistent with empirical evidence. Using newer data in 1993, Friedman reached the same conclusion.) Undeterred, the author simply repeats that every time the government tampers with the money supply, disaster follows as dusk follows day.

Krugman addressed this issue directly in a New York Times article on Paul. After Lehmann Brothers caved, the government began a policy of not only expanding the monetary base, but tripling it. What happened?
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By John Carter on September 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was disappointed as I follow and respect both of these individual's opinions. What let me down is the one sided presentation and lack of depth. Also it appears to be self published. Congratulations to the author, one fool at a time.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By S. Shaw on November 25, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book makes me feel like a sucker for expecting that it would teach me something about our recent economic history. It is instead a political screed based on secondary and tertiary sources. And if you care to notice, one of the editorial reviews is by an employee of Mr. Hammond, since he is the founder and editor of Foreign Policy Journal, a self-published journal. Save time and money by getting your facts elsewhere.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Gjörwell on June 3, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The author is clearly in the camp of the Austrian economic school. Chapter by chapter Krugman is destroyed by both logic and quotations. While I both agree with the premise and the conclusion presented, it would have been nice if Krugman where to have been asked directly about the subjects in the book. I just find it a little one-sided to give it a 5/5 rating but it is very much a great read for anyone interested in what mainstream economists fail to recognize.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alex P. Keaton on October 26, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Are you disturbed by the fact that you've worked hard and diligently saved your money, but now your savings account yields less than 1% interest? Are you curious as to which economists think punishing savers is a good idea?

Mr.Hammond has written a timely book regarding the current economic misery in America and its intellectual foundations. I am quite stunned to read the reviews that claim Mr.Hammond is being biased; he provides COMPLETE references to all his quotes so you can see that nothing is taken out of context. Facts vindicate those who are correct and expose those who are not. There's no bias here. It is crucial to note that this book discusses economic theory. This is not a "Republican vs. Democrat" issue! There are PLENTY of big government republicans out there. Democrats can appreciate Austrian economics as much as Libertarians do. This book is about acknowledging the fact that economics is a behavioral science. Paul Krugman assumed that a housing bubble would be acceptable because it would slowly fade away as the economy improved; he was wrong. His understanding of the economy is parochial. His inability to admit his mistakes is obvious. His fundamental dishonesty is disgusting. Skeptical democrats need look no further than Jan 2013, (NY Times, "Be Ready To Mint That Coin"), when the good professor suggested a trillion dollar coin. Seriously? If you're a liberal and even Jon Stewart is mocking you, you know you've done something wrong.

All kidding aside, Krugman is a poor economist and more than a decade of editorials and blog posts confirm this. Krugman pays homage to Keynes, a splendid mathematician but a poor economist, (not surprisingly, there isn't a single Fabian Socialist that you can call a competent economist).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jim Cox on June 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This short book gives the relevant quotes from Ron Paul and Paul Krugman. I don't know of any other source for such a comprehensive comparison of what these two leaders had to say about monetary policy and the housing bust. Two thumbs up!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Jatin S on May 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One comes away reading this book with little or no doubt as to who's been right and who's been wrong. The method the author uses for this is very difficult to take issue with. It's basically a timeline of who said what when (based on public record), whether they stayed consistent, or whether they backtracked or contradicted themselves after the fact.

Even if you agree with Krugman (as many do), it's startling and worthwhile to see how his writings have evolved over time, and how many mistakes he's made with his economic predictions and refused to acknowledge. While this may not be the best reflection on the opposing economic theories, it is a good reflection on the two individuals. I highly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search