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Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox (1882-1940) Kindle Edition

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Length: 547 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“A case study unmatched in American political writings.” —Newsweek
 
“A sensitive, shrewd, and challenging book” —The New York Times
 
“An absorbing narrative, rich in detail . . . a brilliant full-length portrait of Franklin Roosevelt the politician.” —The Christian Science Monitor

About the Author

James MacGregor Burns (b. 1918) is a bestselling American historian and political scientist whose work has earned both the National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize. Born in Boston, Burns fell in love with politics and history at an early age. He earned his BA at Williams College, where he returned to teach history and political science after obtaining his PhD at Harvard and serving in World War II. Burns’s two-volume biography of Franklin Roosevelt is considered the definitive examination of the politician’s rise to power, and his groundbreaking writing on the subject of political leadership has influenced scholars for decades. He currently serves as the Woodrow Wilson Professor of Government Emeritus at Williams College and as Distinguished Leadership Scholar at the University of Maryland.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

87 of 91 people found the following review helpful By Steven S. Berizzi on April 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
I recently had occasion to re-read James MacGregor Burns's marvelous Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox and was deeply impressed by how well its has withstood the test of time. The early paperback edition of this book, which was originally published in 1956 and covers the period from 1882 until 1940, characterized it as the "first political biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt," and it continues to be the authoritative study of Roosevelt's preparation for and then conduct of his first two terms as president, when domestic affairs demanded most of his attention. This remains a wonderful book about this country's greatest politician of the 20th century, and it also offers many penetrating insights into the American political system.
Burns's treatment of Roosevelt is comprehensive, "[treating] much of [Roosevelt's] personal as well as his public life, because a great politician's career remorselessly sucks everything into its vortex." Roosevelt was the only child of a member of the upstate New York landed gentry, and he could have led a life of leisure. Instead, he was sent to Groton School in Massachusetts, where the headmaster, according to Burns, "made much of his eagerness to educate his boys for political leadership." Roosevelt completed his formal education at Harvard College and Columbia University Law School. Burns writes that Roosevelt's first elective office, as a New York State Senator was a "political education," and he became a "Young Lion" in Albany. Roosevelt served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy in Washington, D.C., during World War I and was the candidate for Vice President on the Democrat Party's unsuccessful ticket in 1920. In 1921, Roosevelt was stricken with polio, and the crippling disease would have ended the public career of a less ambitious and determined man.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By James S. MacDuff on March 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
Gives a fantastic account of FDR from his privileged childhood and days at Groton, to his harsh induction into the world of politics; the skill at which he maneuvered the political currents to the New York Capital in Albany, and ultimately the White House. Once there Burns gives an account of passionate dedication to the American people, both during the Depression and WWII, that most likely was not seen since Lincoln. A must for anyone's Presidential Biographical collection.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Wayne A. Smith VINE VOICE on August 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
FDR was perhaps the craftiest politician to occupy the White House since Lincoln. The Title, "...Lion and the Fox" is an allusion to Machiavelli's dictum that one must be stouthearted like a lion and crafty like a fox. FDR combined these qualities to achieve political mastery of his time.
This book focus on his life up to the start of WWII. It paints a thorough life portrait of the president and illustrates the events and experiences that shaped this master politician. Although enjoying congressional majorities like no other president (that certainly aided the implementation of his program), FDR had to over come the reluctance of both GOP and Democrat conservatives to rework the federal government into the active economic and social player it is today. McGreggor's book explains how FDR the man made the New Deal possible.
This is a well written book that gives evidence of being thoroughly researched. For anyone interested in presidential history, I'd recommend this book.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 18, 1997
Format: Hardcover
This is the best account of pre-WWII FDR that has been
written. Burns combines established facts with a commentary
that examines the 32nd President's possible psychological
views on issues. From major decisions during the New Deal
to relationships with Eleanor and staff members, Burns
paints an objective picture of FDR. The picture is neither
rosy nor clouded, but is an intimate portrait of the longest-
serving President in American history.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By crafty lefthander on April 25, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Now in his nineties, the eminent historian James MacGregor Burns devoted much of his career to the study of leadership, and how leaders interacted with others to persuade them to follow in their direction. While Burns was personally an unabashed admirer of Franklin Roosevelt and voted for him four times, The Lion and the Fox, the first of a two-volume work, is not a slavish devotional. Hardly showing any bias, Burns wrote the book as a true academic study of FDR 'S life through his first two presidential terms. Another historian, the octogenarian Paul Johnson, hardly an admirer of the New Deal, called Burns Roosevelt's best biographer. He may well be right.

Roosevelt had strengths and weaknesses. He believed in little except Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the idea that he was elected to do something, anything, to alleviate the Depression. He was not analytical, preferring to learn by discussion. He knew nothing about economics. He thought government was ripe for experimentation, never caring about the potential nuances of the law he executed. He did what he had to do to gain support, never committing to anything until he gathered sufficient backing for this program or that. On the surface, and to the public, he appeared affable, but had a mean streak. He was upper class, but appealed to all sorts of people through his ability to communicate.

This is not the book for analysis of New Deal policies or their effects. Burns is uninterested in the subject of what those policies accomplished, or how they failed, which they essentially did. What matters to the author is how Roosevelt could get liberals and sometimes, old line Democrat conservatives to follow his lead, how he interacted with them. He even backed Republicans for office in the 1934 off-year election if they were of help.
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