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Rose Marie [Remaster]


List Price: $19.99
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Rose Marie  [Remaster] + The Student Prince (1954)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Ann Blyth, Howard Keel, Fernando Lamas, Bert Lahr, Marjorie Main
  • Directors: Mervyn Leroy
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: MGM
  • DVD Release Date: June 27, 2011
  • Run Time: 104 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004X63SFG
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #111,508 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Musical fans, we're calling you, oo-oo-oo, oo-oo-oo! Howard Keel and Ann Blyth (who would later team for Kismet) play stalwart Mountie and backwoods hellion in this grand color and CinemaScope version of the beloved operetta. Filmed largely on location in the Canadian Rockies, Rose Marie combines a charming tale of a tomboy becoming a lady with two love triangles, a murder mystery, settler-vs.-Indian strife and glorious music, including four of the original stage production's tunes: Rose Marie, The Indian Love Call, The Mounties and in a knockout production number staged by Busby Berkeley, Totem Tom Tom. Another highlight: Bert Lahr's comic turn warbling The Mountie Who Never Got His Man. SPECIAL FEATURE: Outtake Musical Number Love and Kisses with Bert Lahr and Marjorie Main

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Customer Reviews

I thought the movie was good and the singing and music superb.
Robert G. Brown
In any case, if you like musicals, this is one you should definitely have in your collection.
Chrijeff
I saw this musical when it first came out and loved the music as well as the scenery.
James N. Sorensen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By CodeMaster Talon on March 6, 2012
Format: DVD
Having grown up watching the immortal Nelson Eddy/Jeanette MacDonald version of "Rose Marie", I admit to complete ignorance that a gorgeous, more faithful 1954 version existed. But lo and behold, this lovely musical has been unceremoniously dumped on DVD, and if you are a fan of golden-age MGM, you might want to pick up a copy.

Based on a 1924 Broadway musical with music by Rudolf Friml, "Rose Marie" has been filmed three times, once in 1928 (with Joan Crawford!), the famous 1936 MacDonald/Eddy version, and lastly this film. Starring a perfectly cast Howard Keel and the also perfectly cast Canadian Rockies, the film is lush, tuneful, romantic and fun.

Keel is Mike Malone, Canadian Mountie, lone wolf, and man's man. Ann Blyth is Rose Marie, orphan and wild woman living alone out in the deep woods after the death of her trapper father. Keel brings her back kicking and screaming to his Mountie outpost, where he proceeds to raise her as his own personal mini-me. This works out fine for a while, until his superiors notice he's got a woman dressed up as a mountie and good grief what will people say? So he packs her off to town "to learn to be a lady" and deposits her with Saloon Gal Lady Jane Dunstock, played by a barely used Majorie Main. Enter Fernando Lamas.

Lamas is sultry French Canadian James Duval; shifty character, devil with the women, and secretly soulful. He and Rose Marie hit it off as friends the moment they meet, but it is during a robbery gone wrong that they connect as something more, in the film's best scene and one of my favorite scenes in any movie.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Byron Kolln HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 14, 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Lovely Ann Blyth starred in two MGM musicals in 1954. One was "The Student Prince", and the other was ROSE MARIE, which has the distinction of being the first MGM musical filmed in the CinemaScope process. It plays fast and loose with the original operetta, but is a fantastically fun time all the same.

Blyth plays the title role, Rose Marie Lemaitre, a tomboyish orphan who has been left in the care of Mike Malone (Howard Keel), captain of the Royal Canadian Mounties. After it becomes apparent that Rose Marie needs to be schooled in the art of being a lady, Mike installs her with saloon owner Lady Jane Dunstock (Marjorie Main). Rose Marie happily swaps her coonskin cap for hair-ribbons and her buckskins for dresses. In the meantime, Rose Marie's head is turned by trapper Jim Duval (Fernando Lamas), the local "bad boy" who soon is implicated in a murder involving local Indian chief, Black Eagle.

ROSE MARIE had been filmed twice before - first in 1928 as a silent starring Joan Crawford (Blyth's screen mother in "Mildred Pierce") and most famously in 1936 with Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy. This 1954 screen version was filmed on location in Mammoth, California (doubling for the Canadian Rockies), and the results show on the screen.

Ann Blyth had been singing since she was a child, but film producers curiously only started showcasing her in full-length musical roles quite late into her screen career. She had co-starred with Mario Lanza in 1951's "The Great Caruso", and following ROSE MARIE was meant to reunite with him in MGM's 'Scope production of "The Student Prince" (Lanza was later replaced by Edmund Purdom). "Kismet" would follow in 1955, but musicals were fast becoming a dying breed, as MGM's studio system began to implode.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Swissangel on May 7, 2011
Format: DVD-R Verified Purchase
Well... it's nice of Warner Brothers to bring out those classic MGM movies on DVD in their Warner Archive Collection.

The movie, filmed in a bright Cinemascope (a lot) on location and glorious Technicolor, is great. Maybe not the best musical like "Seven Brides for seven Brothers" or "Hit the Deck" and "Kismet" (where Howard Keel and Ann Blyth stars again together).

Nice this time: its remastered and contains a unusued musical scene with Bert Lahr and Marjorie Maine as bonus.

the Picture-Format is 2.55:1 and looks great. The picture Quality is almost perfect and also the sound is in stereo. Of course, it could be better.

My biggest problem I have with Warner Archive: NOT RESTORED and NO SUBTITLES (for foreign speaking people or DEAF /hard-of-hearing people).

So I give only 3 Stars.

P.S. I hope they will do a better job for a Blu-Ray release.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A. J. De Koning on September 17, 2011
Format: DVD
I completely agree with the review from Toni Riess from Switzerland. If the Warner Archive series had SUBTITLES I would buy a lot of them. but without that, I only bought a few DVD's which I already regret because they are difficult to follow without subtitles. I will definitely buy no more now. For the price Warner is asking for those DVD's they could well have subtitled them and made a lot of people happy.
Ad de Koning, Almere, Holland
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 13, 2009
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
I recieved the item and it was defective and I was reimbursed , no questions asked it was very good customer service.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Chrijeff VINE VOICE on February 7, 2013
Format: DVD
In the beautiful Canadian Rockies in the late Victorian era, rugged Sgt. Mike Malone (Howard Keel) of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is on a mission: to find Rose Marie Lemaitre, the daughter of a trapper who took sick and died at his post the previous fall and asked his commanding officer to assume her care. He finds her, too--a buckskin-clad little wildcat (Ann Blyth) who begs him to leave her where she is ("I live in this country all my life, I love it here!"), and tries first to knife him and then to bite him when he insists that he "has his orders" and that a Mountie "always gets his man--or woman." At first their relationship is rocky, but when Mike teaches her to ride, she comes to like him, and before long she's the company's mascot and mounted drummer, complete with full uniform. Then their Inspector (Ray Collins) discovers she's female, and over her protests packs her off to Maple Rock to live with his cousin, "Lady Jane" Dunstock (Marjorie Main) and "learn to be [a] woman." Again Rose Marie balks at first, but a meeting with trapper Jim Duval (Ricardo Montalban, and, yes, he does his own singing--his accent is unmistakeable) and the gradual realization that Mike is falling in love with her keep her in place. Soon she finds herself caught between her feelings for the two men. Then Jim is accused of murdering an Indian chief (Chief Yowlachie) with whom he had quarrelled over some tribal land he wanted to buy. What will Rose Marie do, and who will she choose?

Besides the wonderful voices (Blyth, like Keel, was a trained singer) and Rudolf Friml music, the movie's high points include the splendid location scenery and somewhat more of a story than many musicals have. Comic relief is provided by Cons.
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