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Rose (New Poets of America) y First printing Edition

18 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0918526533
ISBN-10: 0918526531
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Rose (New Poets of America) + The City in Which I Love You (American Poets Continuum) + Book of My Nights: Poems (American Poets Continuum, 68)
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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In this outstanding first book of poems, Lee is unafraid to show emotion, especially when writing about his father or his wife. "But there is wisdom/ in the hour in which a boy/ sits in his room listening," says the first poem, and Lee's silent willingness to step outside himself imbues Rose with a rare sensitivity. The images Lee findssuch as the rose and the appleare repeated throughout the book, crossing over from his father's China to his own America. Every word becomes transformative, as even his father's blindness and death can become beautiful. There is a strong enough technique here to make these poems of interest to an academic audience and enough originality to stun readers who demand alternative style and subject matter. Rochelle Ratner, formerly Poetry Editor, "Soho Weekly News," New York
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Always A Rose
Ash, Snow, Or Moonlight
Between Seasons
Braiding
Dreaming Of Hair
Early In The Morning
Eating Alone
Eating Together
Epistle
Falling: The Code
From Blossoms
The Gift
I Ask My Mother To Sing
Irises
The Life
Mnemonic
My Indigo
My Sleeping Loved Ones
Nocturne
Persimmons
Rain Diary
Visions And Interpretations
Water
The Weepers
The Weight Of Sweetness
-- Table of Poems from Poem Finder®

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Product Details

  • Series: New Poets of America (Book 9)
  • Paperback: 71 pages
  • Publisher: BOA Editions Ltd.; y First printing edition (March 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0918526531
  • ISBN-13: 978-0918526533
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #84,259 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Lowell on March 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
Mr Lee is one of my favorite poets, period. The Rose is a wonderful collection, and I think I like it a tiny bit better than The City In Which I Loved You. The way that Mr. Lee captures love & longing, subtle forms of love, nuances of parental relationships, and the physical world is amazing.
The first time I read 'Persimmons' it was in a Pushcart Prize Anthology, and I had never seen anything by Lee. It was years ago, and with no access to a printer or computer (stuck on holiday) I hand wrote at least 5 copies to immediately put in the mail to friends because I loved the poem so. Every poet resonates differently, it happens that Mr. Lee echoes some voice that I really understand and appreciate. If you love words, and how they can move together into something magical, he is one to read.
I wanted to include an excerpt, but I'm not sure that's right. Do a web-search on him if you want to see what sort of writing style it is. It's difficult to take a stanza out of context, and it's too hard to pick one. :)
p.s. If you happen to agree with my taste, and you don't know about The Weight of Oranges by Anne Michaels, that's another rewarding read.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By David P. Ryan on December 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
Like a child who possesses a sensual, adult relationship with the world, Li-Young Lee radiates with an open gentleness and delicate sensitivity that seems, at times, almost too fragile to allow him to walk the streets alone. Nothing escapes his keen eye and, as he so poignantly illustrates, the greatest art is all around us, in glimpses that, when combined with memory, produce a renewal of the spirit. Lee's poetry results in a clarification or awakening of feelings that summon the reader's desire to examine his or her feelings, and by examining them, express them. Thus, by reaching into our own self-awareness, we are able to seek redemption. We forgive ourselves. Li-Young Lee is at the leading edge of what is good about contemporary, American poetry. After devouring all his works, my only complaint is that there is too little of it. More, please.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 9, 1998
Format: Paperback
Li-Young Lee works as a commercial artist, and in his poetry, he paints masterful pictures in the readers mind. I believe that the "stand-out" poem from this selection is "From Blossoms."
The idea of "taking what we love inside, to carry within us an orchard" brings a new sense of gratefulness for the memories and knowledge we have, and a profound sense of regret for the experiences, emotions, and knowledge we have missed.
Don't miss the emotions that these poems will evoke in you. Read them, love them, and take them inside.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 26, 1996
Format: Paperback
Li-Young Lee's poetry is lucid in the way he captures the details of living with accuracy and tenderness, it moves the reader to awe.
In poems such as "The gift" and "Early in the morning," Lee reveals the way our families create who we are in a manner that heals the reader and makes us examine our own lives. Lee often writes about his father and his own attempt to understand his connection to him and the heritage bestowed on him.
In "The Gift" Lee uses a splinter as the union of everything that is valuable in his life and all our lives.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By My Inner Chick on February 27, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Kafka said... "We ought to only read books that stab us."
Li-Young Lee has stabbed me with "Rose." In these beautifully crafted poems, he has interlaced the past and the present, his Chinese heritage, mother, father, wife...but Oh, his father is so very present.
Reading Lee's poetry is like soaking in a warm bath, having a lovely dream, remembering something beautiful. The language dripped inside my ears and at times moved me to tears...
His memories about hair...
'The scent of it, hair falling against his face, his skin, brushing it,combing it, braiding it,unbraiding it, hair spilling over, her autumn hair, and finally, caught in his
mother's hair.
I love these imagages. I love Li-Young Lee for stabbing me in the heart and making me feel.
"In my dream I fly
past summers and moths,
to the thistle
caught in my mother's hair, the purple one
I touched and bled for,
to myself at three, sleeping
beside her, waking with her hair in my mouth." -Li-Young Lee-
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Haugh VINE VOICE on March 23, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very rarely does the inspiration for a book of poems make itself so clearly felt throughout. In this case, the shadow of the poet's father is cast clearly across nearly every page. Part I is the homage, Part II is the eulogy and Part III is the aftermath. Every section is cooled by this shadow of loss which doesn't dissipate, even in poems that at first seem to be about something else. Still, I was taken by how powerful & beautiful & even uplifting this book is. It has a working unity that is often missing in other collections.

The ever-present father figure is one key to this unity but so is the recurrence of certain images; particularly, growing things: persimmons, peaches, ivy, apples, roses, hair. His lover is a vegetable for harvest. Persimmons are a metaphor for knowledge. In "Eating Alone," the poem that closes Part I, Lee writes: "I've pulled the last of the year's young onions./The garden is bare now. The ground is cold..." Which brings us again to the poet's father and pears, but now the fruit is dead. The poet and his father walk "among the windfall pears" and his father bends "to lift and hold to my/eye a rotten pear." The poem concludes with the poet left with "my own loneliness./What more could I, a young man, want." A statement, not a question. These memories are the poet's muse, sad but necessary.

Part II is the title poem, Rose, which works as an extended eulogy. At first, it seems like it will free us from the father figure as we move into Part III, where the survivors, like the poet and his mother, take on more influence. Still, Lee never really shakes his father's influence. "The Weepers," for example, reminds us of the continuing presence of grief.

And yet, despite the melancholy that hangs over the book, it is a wonderful read.
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