Qty:1
  • List Price: $33.95
  • Save: $2.03 (6%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Routledge Philosophy Guid... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -Daily Deals-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This Book is in Good Condition. Clean Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason (Routledge Philosophy GuideBooks) Paperback – May 7, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0415119092 ISBN-10: 041511909X

Buy New
Price: $31.92
34 New from $25.31 21 Used from $12.95
Rent from Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$6.57
Paperback
"Please retry"
$31.92
$25.31 $12.95
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.


Frequently Bought Together

Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Kant and the Critique of Pure Reason (Routledge Philosophy GuideBooks) + Critique of Pure Reason (The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant)
Price for both: $64.33

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Routledge Philosophy GuideBooks
  • Paperback: 392 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (May 7, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 041511909X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415119092
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.8 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #79,299 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'This is a quite outstanding introduction to the Critique ... It will help students not only to study the Critique, but also to see why it is so worth studying ... deserves to find itself, and pretty certainly will find itself, at the very top of the reading list for any course on the Critique.' - The Philosophical Quarterly

'In his clear and well-organized book, Gardner succeeds in providing a charitable and compelling reading of the most important sections of Kant's text, while also offering fresh and lucid interpretations of Kant's most provocative arguments. The result is an invaluable companion to the Critique that helpfully illuminates a notoriously opaque work ... Gardner's book is an invaluable resource for any student of Kant and, thus, for any student or teacher of philosophy.' - Mind

The major virtues of Gardner's book are clarity, accuracy, and its focus on the key concepts and arguments of Kant's notoriously complex work. Both serious students and Kant scholars will benefit greatly from Gardner's contribution. - Philosophical Books

About the Author

Sebastian Gardner is a Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of London. He is the author of Irrationality and the Philosophy of Psychoanalysis (1993).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

A guidebook should help the inexperienced reader, not make the severest demands on his or her philosophical understanding.
William Shardlow
Gardner has written a superb guidebook to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, and by far the best available introduction to Kant, period.
meadowreader
The book is very highly recommended as a study guide to Kant's first critique for either graduate or advanced undergraduate students.
Oran Magal

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 46 people found the following review helpful By meadowreader on December 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
The person who develops an interest in philosophy is likely to discover that, much as you might prefer it weren't so, you can't get very far without a decent knowledge of Kant. Everywhere you turn, he keeps showing up. You can finesse Hegel, you can finesse Heidegger, but you can't finesse Kant. You have to bite that bullet, the only question is where to start. This is where to start.

Gardner has written a superb guidebook to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, and by far the best available introduction to Kant, period. This book has been reprinted four times since it was published in 2000, and I think that's because there is nothing else like it. A few reviewers have complained about a lack of clarity here and there. Well, maybe, (an early section on the problem of reality struck me that way on first reading), but we are talking about Kant here, after all. If you hit a patch like that, just plow ahead and come back and try that section again later on. If it's a discussion of some specialized topic that doesn't interest you, skip it. There is so much in Kant, that if you get most of it, you get a lot.

Besides describing and explaining Kant's ideas themselves, Gardner also does a terrific job of discussing the major issues and controversies connected with the interpretation and implications of those ideas. Some of those, like questions about the ontological and epistemological status of ultimate reality ("things in themselves"), have never receded from philosophical debate and probably never will. Near the back is an excellent chapter that locates the CPR within the larger body of Kant's work; the final chapter describes the kind of reception the CPR got when it was originally published, and the sort of influence it has had subsequently. The bibliography is outstanding, and if you want more, the philosophy department at University College London (Gardner is a faculty member there) has outstanding bibliographic resources available on-line.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
For those who are looking for a clear account of Kant's work, Gardner's introduction to the Critique of Pure Reason is an excellent choice. Due to the ambiguity in Kant's prose, the Critique of Pure Reason is virtually impossible for Kant beginners to fully comprehend on their own. This book provides an excellent foundation for further inquiry. I highly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By John C. Landon on July 28, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Correctly assessing the argument in Kant's first Critique is one of the most difficult exercises in philosophy and often overly stylized summaries induce illusions of clarity, when the real argument is in the background, almost too arcane to be grasped, and leaving one in the distressing condition of realizing one hasn't understood a thing. This account has to be the best of the lot, attempting without compromises to survey the whole majestic range. Good job.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brian Tracz on May 4, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The nice thing about this book is that the reader feels like the author is "reading the critique" with the reader herself. Major argumentative difficulties are taken up as they occur, and Gardner analyses Kant's support for his framework keenly.

Another pleasant aspect of Gardner's reading is his attempt to show how Kant's transcendental idealism is systematic, that is, how the first Critique is not merely a compendium of conveniently assembled arguments (as some great interpreters like P.F. Strawson have claimed). Rather, by viewing Kant's project as a "metaphysics of experience" in light of the "Copernican revolution" (in which objects must conform, in some way, to the subjects who know them), Gardner unapologetically reviews the plausibility of Kant's views as a system, not as a list of claims that are supported via analytic argumentation.

At times, I found Gardner's criticism of Kant's arguments somewhat dense and over-compressed. That said, this is not surprising for such a guide, and the most important arguments/developments in the book, like the Refutation of Idealism and the Transcendental Deduction, are given a full, critical, and clear treatment.

For those looking to catch the Kant's overall meaning in the Critique, this book is highly recommended. Its brevity is also laudable. The guide is accessible to those with a basic knowledge of modern philosophy, though not for complete philosophy novices.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By JGM on February 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
Hilary Putnam is reported to have said that "any philosophy that can be put in a nutshell belongs in one."

Is Kant more than a materialist or an idealist? Does he resolve the conflict between rationalists and empiricists? If so, how? What was the "Copernican turn" that Kant is responsible for in Western thought? How did he force us to take the turn? Is it true that are we still thinking in his conceptual vocabulary? Is it accurate to speak of every thinker after Kant as, to some degree, operating within Kantian premises, often without realising it? How have thinkers like Hegel and Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Husserl, even Freud, Jung, Einstein (despite their great differences from one another) all been influenced by Kant?

Clear answers to, or at least a start on, all of these questions can be found in this book.

Get it, read it, study Kant.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Walters on June 18, 2013
Format: Paperback
Gardner's book is a very useful guide to the Critique of Pure Reason, provided the reader already has some acquaintance with Kant. Though an introductory book, it's a relatively demanding and complicated one, and those completely new to Kant would be better advised to steer clear of it until they've read something more elementary.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?