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23 Reviews
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great persona
The greatest strength of this novel is the voice and point of view of its narrator and protagonist Rowdy. Sandlin has done a wonderful job of creating a persona whose dry wit and pigheadedness creates much of the humor in this text. Rowdy's logic can be ridiculously close minded one minute and amazingly tolerant and wise the next. It is this character's contradictory...
Published on September 13, 2008 by B. Wilfong

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Not Worth a Bargain Bin Look
This novel holds two dubious honors: 1) It is the first novel I have ever stopped reading before finishing it - and I made the mistake of trying to read "Anna Karenina" in the fourth grade. And 2) It is the only novel I can think of that the term "jumped the shark" applies to.

The story starts off well enough. As others have noted, Rowdy is an interesting...
Published 19 months ago by Mike D Tate


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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great persona, September 13, 2008
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This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Hardcover)
The greatest strength of this novel is the voice and point of view of its narrator and protagonist Rowdy. Sandlin has done a wonderful job of creating a persona whose dry wit and pigheadedness creates much of the humor in this text. Rowdy's logic can be ridiculously close minded one minute and amazingly tolerant and wise the next. It is this character's contradictory nature and his uncomplicated view on life that gives this novel its innate charm.
Tim Sandlin is a gifted storyteller, and his writing has moments of sheer brilliance. You might be reading a chapter with a ridiculous plot element and all of a sudden stumble upon a line that stops you cold with its depth and singular power. This happened to me numerous times while reading this book, and I for one appreciate a text that has literary elements AND moments of simple "fun".
Be prepared for an ending that is more touching than the reader will be primed for. The situation that Sandlin creates between Rowdy and his son Tyson rings very true, as I know people who have found themselves in very similar circumstances. The reality of that subplot is actually uncomfortable and painful at times because of its harsh authenticity.
Overall "Rowdy in Paris" is a worthwhile and enjoyable read. Buy it. Maybe it will convince Mr. Sandlin's publishers to put more of his books back into print.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thank you once again Mr. Sandlin, January 25, 2008
By 
Kristy Caley (Grain Valley, Mo. USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Hardcover)
Mr. Sandlin has finally embraced globilization. Well sort of. Introduce Rowdy Talbot a true American who has been wronged and according to the cowboy code he can't let that stand. But when he follows his stolen pize to France he discovers what a "fish out of water" truly means. This novel like "Jimi Hendrix Turns 80" faces American stereotypes and injects them with wisdom and a whole lot of humor. I have enjoyed almost all of Tim Sandlin's novels, but this may be his funniest. I got it on the 24th and finished it the same day.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Je t'aime Rowdy!, February 18, 2008
This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Hardcover)
Tim Sandlin's fictional cowboy, Rowdy Talbot, is a conundrum of dichotomies. He is crass and honorable; sensitive and tough; sad, and funny.

In `Rowdy in Paris', Rowdy Talbot's adventure starts with a ménage a trios with two French graduate students after he wins the local rodeo bull riding contest. Rowdy wakes up the next morning to find both the girls and his prized championship belt buckle missing. Being that the buckle was the only thing that Rowdy has ever won and the fact that he feels like it is the only thing that will impress his young son, Rowdy is fit to be tied! He takes off for Paris in pursuit of his beloved buckle. Rowdy finds that things in Paris are a bit different then they are in Wyoming! For one, coffee is served in "shot glasses" and payment is required for use of "the john". Rowdy's flummoxed surprise with everything French is hilarious.

While attempting to recover his buckle, Rowdy uncovers a plot to sabotage McDonald's and with the help of an ex-CIA agent hired by Starbucks (who wants to make sure that they don't suffer the same fate as McDonald's), Rowdy sets off to protect all that is American in France.

During the course of his adventure Rowdy gets into his fair share of bar brawls, falls in love, spies on a courtesan (who might also work for the CIA) on behalf of her husband, even begins to appreciate French espresso!

"Rowdy in Paris" is heartwarming and funny. Sandlin perfectly captures the cowboy mentality and delivers an unusual story filled with laughs.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved, loved, loved this book!, February 2, 2008
By 
Janine Smith (Los Angeles, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Hardcover)
I'm a Sandlin fan from way back. This may be one of his best. Rowdy is the perfect protagonist--he's far from perfect himself, but we love to follow everything he does. Which is fairly insane--flying to Paris to retrieve a lost (don't ask how) rodeo champion belt buckle, fighting possibly-CIA agents and global corporations along the way.

None of which matters much because you'll fall in love with Rowdy's voice and his strict adherence to the Cowboy Code. Even in Paris faced with bisexual political terrorists. Hey, it's all about the hat.

Get this book right now and read it. You won't be sorry.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Finding a new author (in this case finding Tim Sandlin), April 10, 2008
By 
Lyle W. Gray (Cedarburg, Wisconsin USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Hardcover)
Pardon the interruption, however I am rating Tim Sandlin as a "new author find" vs. this specific book. While I own "Rowdy in Paris", I elected to go back and read early Sandlin first...specifically his Sam Callahan trilogy (Skipped Parts, Sorrow Floats, and Social Blunders)

If you are like me, you run out of your favorite authors books, go back and read anything ever written by a good one, and constantly look for new ones.(And many times throw new authors in the trash before finishing) Add Sandlin to your list of must reads, if you haven't discovered him already. I think I found him on one of the other "crazy" author web pages of recommendations (Carl Hiaasen, Bill Fitzhugh, Christopher Moore, or Tim Dorsey...not really sure)

Sandlin's early three books (I like the second one, Sorrow Floats best) show a great talent for "laugh out loud" humor, while still having great social and individual relationship perspective and commentary. Some have reviewed that Sandlin can get "outrageous"...if so, my kind of writing.....IMHO, you can not go wrong reading Tim Sandlin.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why does Kindle cost more than hardback or paperback??, June 15, 2011
This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Kindle Edition)
I would love to read this on my Kindle but not if it costs more than hardback or paperback. I'll be ordering this from my independent book dealer.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Rowdy bundle of fun, February 17, 2008
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This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Hardcover)
I just finished "Rowdy in Paris" and repercussions were about what you'd expect. I laughed my hind end off.

For longtime Sandlin fans, this novel is sure to be a joy as the author returns to the first person voice that marks his most beloved work. Rowdy Talbot speaks in pretty much the same voice as Sandlin's most famous creations, Kelly Palomino and Sam Callahan and this gaurantees that the book is going to be a joyous comic romp. True, the plot is a little much to believe and the geo-political stuff and Rowdy's fish out of water critiques of French culture are a little forced, but that's not the point. The real fun here is in Rowdy's musings on the cowboy code and life in general and the way Sandlin mixes humor with moments of real tenderness and sweetness. If you're not already a member of the Cult of Tim, I'm not sure this is the best place to start--Skipped Parts probably would be far better. However, for longtime fans, especially those who didn't quite dig Sandlin's last two novels (or those who did) this really hits the spot.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rowdy in Paris, November 18, 2008
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This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Hardcover)
Very funny novel with lots of cowboy philosophy. Young bull rider spends his last dollars to fly to Paris, France to recover his stolen rodeo championship belt buckle. Why? To give it to his young son who lives with his ex-wife. Why? So the kid won't be brain-washed by his mother when she tells the boy that his father never amounted to anything. Along the way Rowdy learns more about life and love.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A rip-roaringly hilarious adventure!, December 9, 2013
This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Hardcover)
It's hard not to love Rowdy Talbot, especially if you're a guy. A mediocre cowboy and even less-than-mediocre bullrider, he nevertheless embraces a cowboy code to which he is unwavering. When he finally wins first prize at the Crockett County rodeo in Colorado, Rowdy gets drunk and winds spending the night with a pair of nubile young French girls. The next morning they are gone, and with them his championship belt buckle, so Rowdy buys a ticket to Paris and sets out to reclaim his prize.

At first glance, it may seem that very little is at stake, but there is more to Rowdy than spurs and a ten-gallon hat. Rowdy is a divorcee, estranged from his ex-wife and his son, and the buckle to him is validation that he is not a complete failure. Once in Paris, however, the quest becomes about more than a belt buckle as Rowdy gets caught up with a group of French revolutionaries intent upon destroying a popular fast food chain. And although Rowdy may be a man's man, he's not exactly John Wayne.

This book is like a big bucket of popcorn, or at least it deserves to be read with one by your side. Screenwriter Tim Sandlin creates a fast-paced, cinematic experience that has the look and feel of one of those obscure cult movies you rent with your drinking buddies on a Saturday night. But this isn't just a guys's book. The story is surprisingly moving, especially when Rowdy wins the affection of one of the two French girls, a jazz-loving hipster who proves herself to have untapped reserves of tenderness, so women will find something to love as well.

All in all, this is a fun little romp in the City of Lights, and as a man who loves both westerns and Paris in equal measure, I couldn't put it down.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wyoming 2, Paris 0, November 20, 2013
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This review is from: Rowdy in Paris (Paperback)
I confess I always like Sandlin, even when he's off kilter. This book I loved though, it's no half-measure from a half-hearted writer. Rowdy is all-in, chasing a French philosophy major to Paris to get back the prize-winner belt buckle he took at a rodeo. Lots of sex, plenty of humor, Wyoming with a nasal inflection and french food. Unlikely situations but familiar and funny characters. Best he's written since Sex and Sunsets, for my money.
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Rowdy in Paris
Rowdy in Paris by Tim Sandlin (Paperback - January 6, 2009)
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