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Rubber Factory

September 24, 2004 | Format: MP3

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 24, 2004
  • Release Date: September 24, 2004
  • Label: Fat Possum Records
  • Total Length: 41:33
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001GXNBJW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (146 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,299 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

It's just real, raw good music.
Haydee Carvallo
I think this is a good first album to start with to get into these guys.
G. Garcia
And it happens to sound pretty damn good, too.
Joe Miller

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 64 people found the following review helpful By M. S. Hillis on February 5, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
After an explosive debut album and a mellower sophomore effort, Akron duo The Black Keys roar back with "Rubber Factory", a passionate, catchy, masterpiece that proves these guys are for real.

In their third album in as many years, the Keys press ahead with their revival of the long-sputtering genre of blues rock. Having rejected a major record label and signed instead with blues authority Fat Possum, the Keys stay true to their fuzzed-out demo-tape sound, recording the album in an abandoned tire factory, with drummer Patrick Carney producing the songs on his trusty 4-track (or did they graduate to 8-track by now?). Topping both their previous efforts, "Rubber Factory" does not have a single bad song. It is actually difficult to pick the best ones because they are ALL so good.

Unlike "The Big Come Up" and "Thickfreakness", though, "Rubber Factory" starts off in low gear with the mellow "When the Lights Go Out". Things get pumped up right after that with what is undoubtedly the catchiest song they've done yet -- "10 a.m. Automatic". This song is so fun and addictive it takes a conscious exertion of will not to just play it over and over.

The nice mellow ride of "Just Couldn't Tie Me Down" recalls a bit of the juke joint feel so prevalent on "Thickfreakness". The next three tracks -- "All Hands Against His Own", "The Desperate Man" and "Girl Is On My Mind" -- form a trio of catchy, classic-rock style tunes. Things mellow out a bit for a sugary ballad, "The Lengths", but get kicked right back up with "Grown So Ugly", a jammin' and hard-hitting rock number. "Stack Shot Billy" is a wonderful electric-slide resurrection of the outlaw song, and shows that these guys know their source material.
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By R. E. James on September 7, 2004
Format: Audio CD
What if Queens of the Stone Age ditched the bombast? What if White Stripes ever discovered that long missing testosterone hormone? Neither would have made a better record the Black Keys' Rubber Factory, hands down the rock album of the year. Yup it's two of them and they're a black to Jack's White and both bands love the blues, but there the similarites end. Not content with impressive pastiche like the Stripes, or cheekiness like the Blues Explosion, the Keys head past the blues for blistering riff-rock. Like the new garage rockers, the sound is vital and sharp. Unlike the garage rockers, it has buckets of soul, sin and sex. It helps that singer Dan Auerbach has the best voice in rock. It also helps that drummer Patrick Carney has been studying his Wu-tang records instead Led Zeppelin's. Even more remarkable, the Black Keys may have made the first garage rock record relevant to their own generation. In the past, sloppy production blunted their attack, but here the crispness sharpens their sound and fury. This is what rock and roll's beating heart sounds like.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Paul Allaer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 20, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The Akron-based duo Black Keys (not to be confused with that other white color-named duo from Detroit) serve up their latest serving of 70s influenced rock-and-blues garage sound, and this time better than ever. This album just explodes with energy!

"Rubber Factory" (13 tracks, 41 min.) starts off with a blazing "When the Lights Go Out", and doesn't let up from there. "The Desparate Man" sounds like The Jimi Hendrix Experience revived right here in your veru own living room, as does "Girl Is On My Mind", really outstanding. "The Lenghts" is the unexpected track, a ballad of some sort (gulp?), but it works somehow. "Stack Shot Billy" and "Aeroplane Blues" are heavy blues-influenced tracks. The album closer "Till I Get My Way" sums up the album perfectly, an all-out rocker with strong guitar-feedback, wow.

The Black Keys are coming to Cincinnati shortly, and that's a show I'm not gonna miss. I can't wait to see these guys bring the songs from "Rubber Factory" in a live setting. Obviously this album isn't gonna be big on the charts, but no matter, this is a great album. And please, play it loud!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr.Sinister on March 2, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Upon my first listen to tracks like "All Against.." and "10 am..." I was completely stunned and could not believe this music was released in 2004 instead of 1968.After hearing "De Stijl" by the Stripes I thought I had heard modern blues rock at the best it could get.But after hearing this album,I've had a change in heart.This is just incredible rock and roll music which offers so many different tempos which all work.Even the slide guitar on the slow number "Lengths" will just tug at your insides.The solo in the middle of "Desparate Man" eerily reflects something Hendrix would do,and the fact that it sounds amazing and not like a rip off,is just a trip.The hands off production really works on here and just shows that less is more.Like many have already said,the fuzzy tone just cooks wonders on all the tracks.The guy,his name escapes me,has an incredible voice which was made for this kind of rock.It doesn't take any getting used to,as supposed to the singer in Kings Of Leon.If you really dig the music of Cream,Hendrix,and Skynyrd then this is definitely worth checking out.I am so glad I discovered this band,music this genuine,pure,raw,and rockin' is too rare to come by these days.

...and could everybody please stop trashing the opening track,its a kick arse tune and ofneof the best on the album!
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