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394 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Rubber is the story of Robert, an inanimate tire that has been abandoned in the desert and then suddenly and inexplicably comes to life. As Robert roams the bleak landscape, he discovers that he possesses terrifying telepathic powers that give him the ability to destroy anything he wishes. At first content to prey on discarded objects and small desert creatures, his attention soon turns to humans, especially a beautiful and mysterious woman who crosses his path. Leaving a swath of destruction behind, Robert becomes a chaotic force and truly a movie villain for the ages.

The titular star of this delightfully perverse and ecstatically witty exercise in comic invention is old and worn out, but not so much that it can't rouse itself from a castoff slumber to roll across the desert and wreak havoc on the inanimate objects, animals, and human beings that cross its path. That includes the audience, both the one viewing at home and the Greek chorus-like group that's gathered on the film's horizon to watch the story unfold through binoculars. There's no explanation why this haphazard band of observers has been chosen to follow the beat-up rubber tire's path of destruction as it anthropomorphizes into a living, breathing, shuddering entity of malice. They engage in an ongoing commentary and string of non sequiturs while the tire goes about exacting telekinetic revenge on the humans who may or may not have done it wrong (until they meet their own untimely end, that is). Writer-director Quentin Dupieux also neglects to explain why some of the actual characters maintain such a coolly self-reflexive spin on the proceedings, especially the small-town sheriff who opens the movie by addressing the camera directly. His deadpan soliloquy is a series of philosophical remarks about the seemingly random reasons why things happened in other movies, ranging from Love Story to E.T. to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. And so it goes, as seen mostly from a ground-level, tire's-eye view in wacky sequences that slip back and forth between slasher-flick gore and existential conundrums. There's no denying the conceptual genius in this saga of an ordinary tire traveling through the dust of a Mojave Desert backwater killing randomly in anticipation of a greater glory to come. Is it a movie within a movie? Is it one of the most entertaining indie-comedy-horror-micro-budget experiences ever? Is it a movie at all? Dupieux offers no help with these questions, only a connected succession of brilliantly bizarre visuals that seem to suggest that the harder you think about it all the more likely it is your head will explode--a fate only too familiar to the beings that have close encounters with the weathered radial. The only sure thing is that Rubber teems with inspiration and free-associative magnificence in its quest for a truth that will probably never reveal itself to a non-rubberized consciousness. --Ted Fry

Special Features


Product Details

  • Actors: Stephen Spinella, Wings Hauser
  • Directors: Quentin Dupieux
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Magnolia Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: June 7, 2011
  • Run Time: 83 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (394 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004TFTE86
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #19,194 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Rubber" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

73 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Kimba W. Lion VINE VOICE on June 19, 2011
Format: DVD
This is a five-star movie all the way, but it will get a lot of bad reviews from people looking for a horror movie, which it is not. It is a movie about movies and about audiences, from an absurdist perspective.

With a premise about as ridiculous as anything SyFy has served up (you know, the people who gave us Dinopossum vs. Crocopillar... or something like that), I expected this thing to peg the old Cheese-o-Meter. C'mon... A tire comes to life and starts killing everyone in sight? Instead, what we have here is a very funny, very literate, and very absurd little film with some great performances.

I fear that explaining what goes on will ruin the pleasure of discovery for those who would appreciate this movie. So I won't.

I'll just say that if you're looking for a horror movie, or a cheesy horror movie, this is not the film you're looking for--go about your business elsewhere. But if the word "absurd" doesn't scare you off, give this movie a try.
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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Adam B. Krenn on July 5, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
I wanted to like this film, I really did. I was enamored with the trailer and couldn't wait to give this one a view. Where it ultimately failed for me is the, in my opinion, ham-fisted delivery of The Plot, at the beginning of the film, by Lieutenant Chad. It wasn't enough for the viewer (i.e. me) to interpret this as art, absurdity and an exercise in "fourth-wall" mechanics. I had to be told this at the very beginning,while also being simultaneously told it is this very technique in story telling which makes a great film and style. Initially I assumed the speech to the viewer/spectator was something a producer insisted to help sell the film so it wouldn't be too abstract, but since the spectators were actually intrinsic to the plot (such that it is), I now assume this was not the case. This pretentiousness quiet simply put the whole film off kilter for me and I couldn't help thinking that the director really believed he was making a masterpiece of cinematic art. Something in which only time will tell. I freely admit, I could not get over this view.

There is some good here, however. This film is actually beautifully shot and visually interesting despite its lackluster scenery. Quentin Dupieux has an eye for some simple and amazing visuals and this reason alone is why I lasted until the end.

This film will likely be loved by some and reviled by others, it is that kind of film. For me it was meh. Worth a viewing if you're curious or as an example of simple and quality cinematography.
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46 of 63 people found the following review helpful By C. Sawin VINE VOICE on May 14, 2011
Format: DVD
Hollywood is full of adaptations, sequels, prequels, remakes, re-imaginings, reboots, and spin-offs. The bottom line is that most movies hitting the big screen are familiar territory. When something original does come along, it usually "borrows" elements from films that influenced it or pays homage to said influential films that came before it. Truth be told, at this stage in the game, technically everything has already been done. Everything has already been written about or filmed or drawn or created digitally. All that's really left out there is the really bizarre topics. The stuff that you either think up randomly one slow Thursday evening or is obviously the result of one of the heaviest acid trips in history. I like to think that Rubber falls somewhere in the middle...of all three categories.

Rubber pretty much had me at Lieutenant Chad's (Stephen Spinella) opening monologue. Hell, he gets out of the trunk of a car just to illustrate the point of "no reason." What makes this scene special is that it kind of breaks the fourth wall while also introducing the secondary storyline of the film. Lieutenant Chad explains what we are about to see to the camera and then it's revealed that there is a crowd of people there who are also about to watch what transpires on screen. Mind you, they're watching with binoculars and their fates are kind of questionable given the film's primary storyline, but it was one of the more unique ways to start off a film.

Rubber is Robert's story. Who is Robert, you may ask? Robert's a tire; a car tire, to be precise. He wakes up one day to find out he likes to roll over anything that gets in his way, but once something more solid crosses his path like a beer bottle is when things get even crazier.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By tvtv3 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 18, 2012
Format: DVD
I tend to watch a lot of off-beat and non-mainstream movies. When you do this, you'll come across as much garbage as there was in the trash compactor scene in the original STAR WARS. However, every once in a while you'll uncover a gem. Sometimes, you'll uncover a really unusual movie that's really not all that great, but is so unusual that the very oddity and absurdity of it makes it stand out and worth watching through. RUBBER is one of those movies.

RUBBER is a movie about a killer tire. The film opens with a man (Jack Plotnick) standing out in the middle of the desert covered in binoculars. Then a car comes driving up a dirt road destroying a bunch of wooden chairs that have been set up as though they were orange safety cones. The car stops and a man in a police uniform (Stephen Spinella) gets out and begins talking into the camera. He gives a long monologue about in every great movie there is an element of something happening for "no reason" and that's what this movie is all about. He then dumps out the beverage in his hand and jumps back into the car and is driven off. Then the man with the binoculars begins passing out binoculars to a group of spectators standing behind roped off pillars. The people take their binoculars and turn around and begin watching the movie. Throughout the rest of the film RUBBER moves back and forth between the action of Robert the Tire and the audience. Towards the end of the movie, the audience actually becomes a part of the movie.

So, with the absurdist theatre element in place, the main "action" follows the deeds of Robert the Tire. It's never explained in the movie how or why (and Robert isn't even given a name, except in the special features and in promotional materials) Robert comes to be. He just rises out of the dirt and is.
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