Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ruby the Copycat Paperback – August 1, 1993


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, August 1, 1993
$1.11 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Series: A Blue Ribbon Book
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks; English Language edition (August 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590474235
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590474238
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 7.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,880,951 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

It seems that something other than coincidence is at work when diminutive Ruby, a newcomer to Miss Hart's class, is entranced by schoolmate Angela's attention-getting red bow and returns from lunch with an identical bow atop her head. Ruby's maddening habit becomes increasingly apparent as she happily endures a rainbow of wet paint in imitation of Angela's hand-painted outfit, proudly plagiarizes Angela's poetry and tries pink press-on nails after admiring Miss Hart's manicure. Finally, challenged to display a talent all her own, Ruby admits that she likes to hop and masterfully bounces around her desk. To her surprise, she impresses her classmates and wins Angela's friendship at last. Rathmann's expressively illustrated, quirky and individualistic first book encourages readers to have confidence and not to take skills, however unimpressive they may seem, for granted. Ages 4-8.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 2-- A book with a strong story and complementary illustrations that addresses the philosophical question of individuality vs. conformity. Ruby, the new girl at school, is immediately taken with Angela's bright red bow. At lunchtime she hops home and returns with a similar bow in her hair. Throughout the week she copies not only what Angela wears but also what she says and does. By Friday Angela is fed up. Their teacher tells Ruby, ``You can be anything you want to be, but be Ruby first.'' On Monday Ruby has moved on to copying her. Prodded by Miss Hart, she admits to having simply spent her weekend hopping, at which point she starts a hopping jamboree and now she is the one who is copied. Watch out-- young readers will immediately begin doing the ``Ruby Hop.'' The artwork is reminiscent of both Amy Schwartz and Kevin Henkes; it's fun, expressive, character oriented, and done in colorful pencil-and-ink drawings. A small gem. --Martha Topol, Northwestern Michigan College, Traverse City, MI
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

"Caldecott-medalist Peggy Rathmann was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, and grew up in the suburbs with two brothers and two sisters.
""In the summer we lolled in plastic wading pools guzzling Kool-Aid. In the winter we sculpted giant snow animals. It was a good life.""
Ms. Rathmann graduated from Mounds View High School in New Brighton, Minnesota, then attended colleges everywhere, changing her major repeatedly. She eventually earned a B.A. in psychology from the University of Minnesota.
""I wanted to teach sign language to gorillas, but after taking a class in signing, I realized what I'd rather do was draw pictures of gorillas.""
Ms. Rathmann studied commercial art at the American Academy in Chicago, fine art at the Atelier Lack in Minneapolis, and children's-book writing and illustration at the Otis Parsons School of Design in Los Angeles.
""I spent the first three weeks of my writing class at Otis Parsons filching characters from my classmates' stories. Finally, the teacher convinced me that even a beginning writer can create an original character if the character is driven by the writer's most secret weirdness. Eureka! A little girl with a passion for plagiarism! I didn't want anyone to know it was me, so I made the character look like my sister.""
The resulting book, Ruby the Copycat, earned Ms. Rathmann the ""Most Promising New Author"" distinction in Publishers Weekly's 1991 annual Cuffie Awards. In 1992 she illustrated Bootsie Barker Bites for Barbara Bottner, her teacher at Otis Parsons.
A homework assignment produced an almost wordless story, Good Night, Gorilla, inspired by a childhood memory.
""When I was little, the highlight of the summer was running barefoot through the grass, in the dark, screaming. We played kick-the-can, and three-times-around-the-house, and sometimes we just stood staring into other people's picture windows, wondering what it would be like to go home to someone else's house.""
That story, however, was only nineteen pages long, and everyone agreed that the ending was a dud. Two years and ten endings later, Good Night, Gorilla was published and recognized as an ALA Notable Children's Book for 1994.
The recipient of the 1996 Caldecott Medal, Officer Buckle and Gloria, is the story of a school safety officer upstaged by his canine partner.
""We have a videotape of my mother chatting in the dining room while, unnoticed by her or the cameraman, the dog is licking every poached egg on the buffet. The next scene shows the whole family at the breakfast table, complimenting my mother on the delicious poached eggs. The dog, of course, is pretending not to know what a poached egg is. The first time we watched that tape we were so shocked, we couldn't stop laughing. I suspect that videotape had a big influence on my choice of subject matter.""
Ms. Rathmann lives and works in San Francisco, in an apartment she shares with her husband, John Wick, and a very funny bunch of ants.
"

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
14
4 star
1
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 16 customer reviews
When I was 9 years old, I read this book at a daycare where I stayed.
Britt
We love all of Rathman's books, but this is my favorite one to read to my children.
Kelly K
It's a terrific book which expresses simply the beauty of being one's self.
Amy S.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
Even now in Middle School, I get this book out and read it! I bought it when I was in the 2nd grade and I still have the copy.. as a matter of fact I was reading it not too long ago,and I suggest you read it as a family. It has a good storyline :-)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kelly K on August 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
I can't believe any reviewer would criticize the illustrations in this book! As in every Rathman book, the quirky and humorous pictures are half the fun. We love all of Rathman's books, but this is my favorite one to read to my children. In fact, it's one of my favorite books in our entire collection. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 16, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I am 13 years old and I remember that Ruby the Copycat was the first real book I have ever read on my own. This is not counting "Jane ran..." books, so I was about six or seven when I read this book. My mom told me I used to read it over and over and over and over to her. It was such a great book, and still is, and untill this day I still have it!!! I recommend this book to any beginning reader. Ruby is so cute and I LOVE her hair!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Eric Shank Van Eenige on December 20, 2001
Format: Paperback
We read Ruby the Copycat in my second-grade classroom, and the kids really gravitated toward it. The illustrations are appropriately stylized to clearly deliver character emotions, and there are subtle details in the pictures that breathe more life into the characters. Ruby reminds me of the nervous child in all of us that seeks to fit in. I highly, highly recommend this book for in-class reading. Buy a class set!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
Wow, I think Hornbook is a great publication, but their reviewer was way off on this one: "Ruby the Copycat" is a funny, endearing book and the illustrations add immeasurably to its quirky charm! Some reviewers seem to think that kids need the complexity of Dickens in their story plots, but what seems "forced" and "pat" to one reader seems neat and effective to this one. Highest recommendation for this story (and be sure to check out Rathmann's other great titles, "Officer Buckle and Gloria" and "Ten Minutes to Bedtime").
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 7, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I like this book! It gets five stars because whenever my teacher reads the book to us at school, I want to take it home with me!!!! I want to read it to my mom so she can listen to me. I think she would like the story too! I like it when Ruby and Angela copy each other, especially when they like each other's bows. I like it when they are friends at the end of the story, and they hop home for lunch!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Tsila Sofer Elguez on September 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
I have mixed feelings regarding this book. On the one hand the book is funny and deals with a real life problem of kindergarden and primary school children ("he is a copycat" is a regular accusation at my house). However, reading this story after reading Peggy Rathmann's three other books: "Gorilla", "Officer Buckle and Gloria" and "Ten minutes till bedtime" is a little disappointing. The three books mentioned are totally hilarious and I feel they are all unique and special works of art. This book however, although very good, does not come to their masterpiece level.
"Ruby the Copycat" is written with a neutral voice without "taking sides" - just telling the story as it is. Reader can understand both Ruby, the copycat, and in a way even understand why she is copying (Ruby is the new kid and Angela's ribbon is so very charming) but also see the point of view of those being copied - as Angela, whose every act (red ribbon in hair, rainbow painted shirt) is copied by Ruby. At first this is nice and Angela whispers back at Ruby "I like your ribbon" - but after a while Angela does not whisper any more... Ruby is stripping her of all individuality. These are an adult words but the book is written in a language every child can understand and the pictures are there to strengthen the words. Ruby wins the readers heart in the end when following the teacher's advice (don't we all wish for such teachers) finds her own unique "thing" and now the children copy Ruby's "hopping".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Vrieze on July 25, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Ruby is a new girl in a new class. She is afraid to be herself. She finds a girl and little by little starts dressing like her and supposedly doing the same things as she does. This other girl is Angela, who gets very upset with Ruby and tells Mrs. Hart the teacher.

Ruby is a little girl who is nervous and insecure about herself. She is afraid she will not be accepted or liked if she is who she really is.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?